Location: McCracken County KY

Slave Narrative of America Morgan

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: America Morgan Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Ballard County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1852 Place of Residence: 816 Camp Street Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. AMERICA MORGAN-EX-SLAVE 816 Camp Street America Morgan was born in a log house, daubed with dirt, in Ballard County, Kentucky, in 1852, the daughter of Manda and Jordon Rudd. She remembers very clearly the happenings of her early life. Her mother, Manda Rudd, was owned by Clark Rudd, and the “devil has sure got him.” Her father was owned by Mr. Willingham, who was very kind to his slaves. Jordon became a Rudd, because he was married to Manda on the Rudd plantation. There were six children in the family, and all went well until the death of the mother; Clark Rudd whipped her to death when America was five years old. Six little children were left motherless to face a “frowning world.” America was given to her master’s daughter, Miss Meda, to wait on her, as her personal property. She lived with her for one year, then was sold for $600.00 to Mr. and Mrs. Utterback stayed with them until the end of the Civil war. The new mistress was not so kind....

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Slave Narrative of George Scruggs

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: L. Cherry Person Interviewed: George Scruggs Location: Calloway County, Kentucky Place of Birth: Murray, Kentucky Story of Uncle George Scruggs, a colored slave: I wuz a slave befo de wa. My boss, de man dat I b’long to, wuz Ole Man Vol Scruggs. He wuz a race hoss man. He had a colod boy faw evy hoss dem days and a white man faw evy hoss, too. I wuz bawn rite here in Murry. My boss carrid me away frum here. I thought a heap uv him and he though a heap uv me. I’d rub de legs uv dem hosses and rode dem round to gib em excise. I wuz jes a small boy when my boss carrid me away from Murry. My boss carrid me to Lexinton. I staid wid Ole Man Scruggs a long time. I jes don no how long. My boss carrid me to his brother, Ole Man Finch Scruggs. He run a sto and I had to sweep de flo uv de sto, wash dishes and clean nives and falks evy day. Ole Man Finch Scruggs carrid my uncle up thar wen Ole Vol carrid me. Ole Man Finch Scruggs liv’d at a little town called Clintinvil on tuther side uv Lexinton. Wen Ole man Vol Scruggs marid, he...

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Slave Narrative of Mrs. Hannah Davidson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: K. Osthimer Person Interviewed: Hannah Davidson Location: Toledo, Ohio Place of Birth: Ballard County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1852 Place of Residence: 533 Woodland Avenue, Toledo, Ohio Mrs. Hannah Davidson occupies two rooms in a home at 533 Woodland Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. Born on a plantation in Ballard County, Kentucky, in 1852, she is today a little, white haired old lady. Dark, flashing eyes peer through her spectacles. Always quick to learn, she has taught herself to read. She says, “I could always spell almost everything.” She has eagerly sought education. Much of her ability to read has been gained from attendance in recent years in WPA “opportunity classes” in the city. Today, this warm hearted, quiet little Negro woman ekes out a bare existence on an old age pension of $23.00 a month. It is with regret that she recalls the shadows and sufferings of the past. She says, “It is best not to talk about them. The things that my sister May and I suffered were so terrible that people would not believe them. It is best not to have such things in our memory.” “My father and mother were Isaac and Nancy Meriwether,” she stated. “All the slaves went under the name of my master and mistress, Emmett and Susan Meriwether. I...

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Biography of Herman Hecht

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Herman Hecht is the secretary and treasurer of Korrekt Klothes, Inc., of St. Louis. The company engages in the manufacture of men’s and young men’s clothing at No. 1633 to 1641 Washington avenue. Mr. Hecht was born in Coblentz, Germany, June 7, 1866, a son of Simon and Henrietta (David) Hecht, the father a well known capitalist of Coblentz. The mother, following the death of her husband, came to America in 1875, settling in Louisville, Kentucky, whence she afterward removed to Paducah, that state, her death there occurring in 1881 when she was sixty years of age. She was the mother of four sons and five daughters. Herman Hecht, the youngest of the family, was educated in the public schools of Coblentz, in the high school at Paducah, Kentucky, and in the Lyons Business College of that city. At the age of sixteen years he was one of the founders of the firm of Hecht Brothers & Company of Paducah, Kentucky, engaged in the wholesale clothing business. He sold his interest in that business in 1893 to accept a position with the Schwab Clothing Company of St. Louis. In 1898, after being with the Schwab Clothing Company for four years he again associated himself with his brothers in the wholesale clothing business in St. Louis, under...

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Poole, Fannie Brothers Molstrom – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A graveside funeral service for Fannie Molstrom Poole will be held at Olney Cemetery in Pendleton on Friday at 10 a.m. Mrs. Poole, 92, of Pendleton, died Tuesday, May 14, 1991, at Amber Valley Care Center in Pendleton. She was born Oct. 10, 1898, at Paducah, KY, to Chris Henry and Rachael Valentine Lee. She married Roy Brothers in 1915; they were later divorced. On March 4, 1929, she married Henry Molstrom. The couple was engaged in farming north of Pendleton for over 60 years. Mr. Molstrom died in 1975. In 1982 she married Elwyn Poole. He died in 1986. Mrs. Poole was very active in the Democratic Party and received three presidential invitations to the Inaugural Ball from presidents Kennedy, Johnson, and Carter. She was president of the Ladies Democratic Club, was Congressman Al Ullman’s County Chairman for six years, Umatilla County Democratic Central Committee Woman for many years, served as chairman of fund-raising for Azalea House at Oregon State University, sponsored dances at Cold Spring Grange Hall; was a member of the Round-Up Hall of Fame committee when it was organized; appointed to the Umatilla County Welfare Commission by Gov. Robert Holmes and Gov. Mark Hatfield; and served with a Umatilla County group to encourage women to vote. She was a member of the...

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Biography of Benjamin H. Milliken

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Benjamin H. Milliken, senior member of the firm of Milliken & Jaques, proprietors of the Riverside Paint Store, one of the leading business houses in the city. The subject of this sketch was born in McCracken County, Kentucky, in 1847. His father, Judge John Milliken, was a native of North Carolina, who came to Kentucky in his youth, and was reared in that State. He there married Miss Harriet L. Hord. He was a lawyer by profession, and prominent in political and judicial circles. He lost his life in the cause of the South, meeting his death in 1861, while serving as a quartermaster in the Confederate Army. Mr. Milliken was reared and schooled in his native place, and, like his father, was loyal to the sunny South and her cause. At the commence meat of the war his youth prompted his enlisting in her armies, but it did not deter him from devoting himself to the service of the Confederacy as a volunteer aid and scout. Upon one of his visits to Paducah he was captured by the Federal troops, tried as a spy and condemned to be shot. The defective evidence upon which he was condemned and his youth enlisted the justice and sympathy of General Halleck, and he set aside the sentence and...

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McCracken County, Kentucky Census Records

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now 1790 McCracken County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 McCracken County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 McCracken County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 McCracken County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 McCracken County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 McCracken County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 McCracken County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at McCracken County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Archives Census Index Hosted at RootsWeb Census Transcription Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 McCracken County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1840 McCracken County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 McCracken County, Kentucky Census Records Hosted at Free 1850 Census Form for...

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McCracken County, Kentucky Cemetery Records

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now McCracken County McCracken County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at McCracken County USGenWeb Archives Project Unknown Cemetery #1 Unknown Cemetery #2 Boldry Cemetery Graham Cemetery Harmony Baptist Church Cemetery Oak Grove Cemetery Spring Bayou Baptist Church Cemetery Scott Cemetery McCracken County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at McCracken County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Boldry Cemetery Newton Creek Cemetery Oak Grove Cemetery Unknown McCracken County Cemetery #1 Unknown McCracken County Cemetery #2...

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