Location: Martha Vineyard Massachusetts

Descendants of John Folger

John Folger, b. 1590, d. 1660. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now He came from Norwich in Norfolk in 1635 on the “Abigale” and settled in Dedham, Mass., in 1638, and in Watertown, Mass., in 1640, then went to Martha Vineyard. He married Merible Gibbs. ISSUE: (2) Peter b. (England) 1617, d. Nantucket 1690; m. Mary Morrill in 1640. She was from Salem, Mass.; she came over in the same ship with Peter. (She died in 1704.) ISSUE-(10 children; see Folger Genealogy). One of their sons was John Folger (3), b. 1659; d. Aug. 23, 1732; m. Mary Barnard, daughter of Nathaniel Barnard. John and Mary (Barnard) Folger had children as follows: Nathaniel (3), b. Feb. 18, 1694; d. June 15, 1775; m. Priscilla Chase, Nov. 18, 1718. Priscilla was the daughter of Isaac Chase, born 1647, died at Martha’s Vineyard, 1727, and married Mary Perkins. Isaac Chase was son of Thomas Chase, who died July 25, 1604. His wife was Elizabeth Philbrick. (4) Nathaniel Folger,...

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Black-Indian History

The first black slaves were introduced into the New World (1501-03) ostensibly to labor in the place of the Indians, who showed themselves ill-suited to enforced tasks and moreover were being exterminated in the Spanish colonies. The Indian-black inter-mixture has proceeded on a larger scale in South America, but not a little has also taken place in various parts of the northern continent. Wood (New England’s Prospect, 77, 1634) tells how some Indians of Massachusetts in 1633, coming across a black in the top of a tree were frightened, surmising that; ‘he was Abamacho, or the devil.” Nevertheless, inter-mixture of Indians and blacks has occurred in New England. About the middle of the 18th century the Indians of Martha’s Vineyard began to intermarry with blacks, the result being that “the mixed race increased in numbers and improved in temperance and industry.” A like inter-mixture with similar a results is reported about the same time from parts of Cape Cod. Among the Mashpee in 1802 very few pure Indians were left, there being a number of mulattoes 1Mass Hist. Soc. Coll., r, 206; iv, 206; ibid., 2d s., iii, 4; cf. Prince in Am. Anthrop., ix, no. 3, 1907. Robert Rantoul in 1833 2Hist. Coll. Essex Inst., xxiv, 81 states that “the Indians are said to be improved by the mixture.” In 1890, W. H. Clark 3Johns Hopk. Univ. Circ.,...

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