Location: Marshall County TN

Slave Narrative of Cecelia Chappel

Person Interviewed: Cecelia Chappel Location: Nashville, Tennessee Place of Birth: Marshall County, Tennessee Age: 102 Place of Residence: 705 Allison Street, Nashville, Tenn. “I’se bawn in Marshall County, Tennessee. I’m de olest ob ten chilluns en I’se 102 ya’rs ole. I feels lak I’se bin ‘yer longer dan dat. Mah mammy wuz brought ter Nashville en sold ter sum peeple dat tuck her ter Mississippi ter live.” “Mah Marster en Missus wuz named Bob en Nancy Lord. Eve’y slave had ter say Missus en Marster en also ter de white babies. I still says hit, en ef I kum ter yo do’r, I nebber kums in ’till you ax me. Lots ob mah folks seze ter me dat I ez too ole fash’on en I seze I don’ keer I wuz raised wid manners en too ole ter change.” “Our Marster gib us good food en clothes. I wuz l’arnt how ter nit, weav, sew en spin. On rainy days we wuz gib a certain ‘mount ob weavin’ ter do en had ter git hit don’. I dunno how ter read er rite. De white folks didn’ ‘low us ter l’arn nuthin’. I declar’ you bettuh not git kotch wid a papah in you han’. Ef I had half a chance lak you chilluns hab, I’d go ter bed wid mah books.” “Our Marster ‘lowed us ter go ter...

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Biography of Prof. T. B. Kelly

Prof. T. B. Kelly, A. M., LL. B., president of Pure Fountain College, Smithville, was born in Columbia, Maury Co., Tenn., in 1852. His parents were Thomas J. and Elizabeth (Hardwicke) Kelly. The father was of Irish descent, born March 9, 1810, in Dickson County, Tenn., where his father, Thomas Kelly located after emigrating from Ireland, about 1800. Thomas J. married in 1838, and about 1844 moved to Columbia, where he established a queens ware store, which he managed successfully until the year of his death, 1861. His first wife was of French extraction, born in 1817, in Buckingham County, Virginia She died in January 1854. There were eleven children, only two of who are living: George M., a farmer of Maury County, and our subject. Prof. Kelly received his early education in his native county, at Jones’ Academy. In 1837 he entered the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, remaining five months. In the winter of 1873 he began the study of law at Nashville, his preceptor being Hon. F. C. Dannington. He also assisted in the office of the clerk of the Supreme Court. In the fall of 1874 he entered the law department of Cumberland University at Lebanon, graduating the following June. He located in his native town. In September 1876, he commenced teaching in the Lewisburg Institute. For fifteen months he was assistant principal, at the...

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Biography of Joseph L. Weaver

JOSEPH L. WEAVER. Joseph L. Weaver is possessed of those advanced ideas and progressive principles regarding agricultural life which seem to be among the chief characteristics of the average native Tennessean. He was born in Marshall County, of that State, on the 20th of November, 1828, to the marriage of John and Barbara (Richards) Weaver, natives, respectively, of North Carolina and Georgia. The parents celebrated their union in the latter State, but subsequently moved to Tennessee, where they settled in Marshall County, remaining there until 1840. They then came by ox team to Missouri, starting the 19th of November, 1840, and reaching Springfield January 8, 1841, and located on a small farm near Ozark. There the father improved a good farm and became well known from the Missouri to the Arkansas Rivers. He was a great stock trader and breeder of fine horses. At one time, while in Memphis with a fine drove of steers, the butcher who purchased them had them decorated with ribbons, etc., and marched them through the streets headed by a brass band in order to exhibit them. Mr. Weaver was a breeder of race horses, fitted them for the track, and was known throughout southwest Missouri and Arkansas as “Jockey John Weaver.” He was a man of positive character and was well liked by all. He died in Memphis, Tennessee, March 4, 1854, while...

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Biography of Judge W. W. Luna

JUDGE W. W. LUNA. Ozark County, Missouri, is an Eden of fine farms and agricultural tracts. There are comparatively few very small tracts, and each farmer tries to outdo his neighbor in the cultivation and improvement of his land. Of the many fine, attractive places none are more conspicuous than that belonging to Judge W. W. Luna, comprising 280 acres of fine bottom land, of which he has been the owner since 1883. The place is well improved, is principally river bottom land, and everything about his estate indicates to the beholder that a thorough and experienced hand is at the helm. Judge Luna was born in Marshall County, Tennessee, December 11, 1852, a son of Elisha and Eliza (Gray) Luna, who were also born in Marshall County, Tennessee The father served throughout the Mexican War under Gen. Taylor, attained the rank of third sergeant, but lost his eyesight during the latter part of the war from becoming overheated. He has now been blind for about thirty-five years. He came to Ozark County, Missouri, in 1855, opened up a farm on Pine Creek and has made his home there up to the present time, being now in his seventy-fifth year. He has always supported the principles of the Republican party, and his sons are stanch supporters of that party also. To him and his wife a family of sixteen...

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Marshall County, Tennessee Cemetery Transcriptions

Tennessee Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Tennessee county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Cemeteries (hosted at Marshall County, Tennessee Tombstone Transcription Project) Carduck Cemetery George W. Ezell Cemetery Horton Cemetery Meadows Cemetery Monument in Farmington Community New Hope Cemetery Talley Cemetery...

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Biography of Samuel D. Cole

When the history of Wallowa County is written, the names of the pioneers are first, when the history of our nation is written let the names of those who fought her battles appear first. In both of these commendable positions appears the gentleman whose name heads this paragraph, and it is with especial (sic) pride and pleasure that we grant him representation in this volume. He was one of those noble men who assisted to open this county; and when dark clouds hung thick over our nation, the banner had been subjected to insult, and freedom’s institutions were trembling before the enemies’ attack, he was quick to throw himself into the breech and he fought faithfully during the entire time of the war of the Rebellion, being valorous and intrepid in battle, faithful in military duty, and upright and true in all his relations. Samuel D. Cole was born on May 30, 1843 in Marshall County, Tennessee, being the son of William P. and Elizabeth Cole. The early years of his life were spent with his parents, gaining in this time a good education, and spending the rest of his time with his father upon the farm. While still a child, the parents removed to Hardin County, Illinois, and in 1852 they went thence to Jasper County, Iowa. In that county, in August 1862, when yet but nineteen years...

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