Location: Marion County IN

Biography of Ira M. Mulliken

Ira M. Mulliken, junior member of the well-known firm of Barr & Mulliken and one of the rising young business men of Newman, was born in Champaign County, Illinois, December 17, 1865. His father, James W. Mulliken, was a native of Johnson County, Indiana, and removed to Champaign County in about 1852. His mother Catherine was a daughter of Rev. Samuel F. Miller, who was horn in 1815, and at present resides in Arcola. (See sketch of W. H. Bush, of Hindsboro.) In about 1868 the father of I. M. Mulliken removed to a farm near Hindsboro, where the latter remained until he arrived at the age of twenty-one years, when he went to Arcola to reside, and there worked at the carpenter’s trade. He attended Lee’s academy at Loxa, Illinois, for six months, then subsequently attended the embalming college at Indianapolis. From 1893 to June 1, 1896, he was a member of the undertaking firm of Mike, Miller & Co., at Charleston, Illinois. In the latter year he removed to Newman to accept a partnership with James Barr (see sketch). On September 4, 1893, he was married to Miss Ida A., a daughter of John W. Allison, of Arcola. They have one child, a daughter, Frances Marie. He is a member and noble grand of the I. O. O. F. elder iii the Christian Church, and superintendent of...

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Biography of William Tomlinson

William Tomlinson. One of the oldest residents of Champaign County is Mr. William Tomlinson, whose home is at Penfield in Kerr Township. Mr. Tomlinson has experienced more than the average trials and ordeals of existence and he is well entitled to the esteem and respect that he enjoys in his community. Mr. Tomlinson was born in the Village of Franklin, near the City of Indianapolis, in Marion County, Indiana, a son of Robert and Rachel (Sheets) Tomlinson. His parents were both born in Indiana and his Grandfather Sheets was of German descent. Mr. Tomlinson was one of eight children, seven sons and one daughter. When he was a child his father died and a little later his mother passed away at Carlyle on the Mississippi River. William Tomlinson came to Vermilion County, Illinois, with his uncle, Elisha Crawford, in 1849, when ten years old. He came to Champaign County in 1852, and arrived here a poor and friendless boy with no money and with nothing except his own determined ambition to stand him in good stead while making a way in the busy world. For a year he worked for a farmer at $6.50 a month, and his hours of employment were from sunup to sundown. When Mr. Tomlinson came to Champaign County there were no railroads and very few towns. The nearest market place for mail and other...

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Old Battleground Cemetery Records, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana

Marion County, Indiana 4720 E. 75th St. out of Indianapolis; 1 block W. of State road #37 on 75th St. ABELL Emeline E., d. 16 Oct. 1887, ae. 68 yrs., 10 mos. Wife to Harman Abell. Harmon, d. 29 June 1850, ae. 36 yrs., 1 mo., 9 days. Husb. to Emeline E. Abell. ALLISON Ruth,, b. 1815, d. 1902. Wife to William Allison. William, b. 1816, d. 1892. Husb. to Ruth Allison. ARMENTROUT Frankie W., dau. of James W. Armentrout and A. E., d. 10 Aug. 1871, ae. 10 mos., 16 days. ARMSTRONG James, d. 27 Feb. 1849, ae. 56 yrs., 5 mos., 25 days. William H. A., d. 15 July 1847, ae. 20 yrs., 3 mos., 1 day. ASHBROOK Cintha Ann, d. 8 Dec. 1868, ae. 50 yrs., 8 mos., 24 days. Wife to Thomas A. Ashbrook. Thomas A., d. 5 Sept. 1849, ae. 49 yrs., 21 days. Husb. to Cintha Ann Ashbrook. BAER Catherine, b. 22 June 1801, d. 4 Dec. 1878. Daniel M., d. 18 July 1852, ae. 18 yrs., 5 mos. John C., d. 17 Mar. 1862, ae. 88 yrs., 5 mos., 29 days. BRUNSON Asber C., b. 25 June 1825, d. 2 July 1905. Husb, to Julia A. Risen. Md. 29 May 1853 in Hamilton Co., Ind. Caroline, b. 4 Sept. 1828, d. 2 July 1904. Claudia D., b. 2 Jan. 1872, d. 8...

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Huffman Cemetery Records, Washington, Marion County, Indiana

Located along the Monon tracks between 61st and 62nd Streets. HUFFMAN Jonas, b. 15 Oct. 1795, d. 13 June 1863, Husb. of Mary. Mary, d. 10 Aug. 1856, ae. 66 yrs. Wife of Jonas Huffman. RAY Joseph, d. 15 Nov. 1863, ae. 73 yrs. RINK Julia Ann, b. 20 Aug. 1828, d. 15 Mar. 1863. Samuel, b. 1 Oct. 1820, d. 11 May 1864, Husb. of Julia Ann. Only a few stones, there is a dump grounds near and many burials are under the...

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Slave Narrative of John Eubanks & Family

Interviewer: Archie Koritz Person Interviewed: John Eubanks Location: Gary, Indiana Place of Birth: Barren County, Kentucky Date of Birth: June 6, 1836 Age: 98 Archie Koritz, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project Lake County-District #1 Gary, Indiana EX-SLAVES JOHN EUBANKS & FAMILY Gary, Indiana Gary’s only surviving Civil War veteran was born a slave in Barren County, Kentucky, June 6, 1836. His father was a mulatto and a free negro. His mother was a slave on the Everrett plantation and his grandparents ware full-blooded African negroes. As a child he began work as soon as possible and was put to work hoeing and picking cotton and any other odd jobs that would keep him busy. He was one of a family of several children, and is the sole survivor, a brother living in Indianapolis, having died there in 1935. Following the custom of the south, when the children of the Everrett family grew up, they married and slaves were given them for wedding presents. John was given to a daughter who married a man of the name of Eubanks, hence his name, John Eubanks. John was one of the more fortunate slaves in that his mistress and master were kind and they were in a state divided on the question of slavery. They favored the north. The rest of the children were given to other members of the Everrett family...

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Slave Narrative of Mittie Blakeley

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Mittie Blakeley Location: Indianapolis, Indiana Place of Birth: Oxford, Missouri Date of Birth: 1858 Place of Residence: 2055 Columbia Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana FOLKLORE MRS. MITTIE BLAKELEY-EX-SLAVE 2055 Columbia Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Mrs. Blakeley was born, in Oxford, Missouri, in 1858. Her mother died when Mittie was a baby, and she was taken into the “big house” and brought up with the white children. She was always treated very kindly. Her duties were the light chores, which had to be well done, or she was chided, the same as the white children would have been. Every evening the children had to collect the eggs. The child, who brought in the most eggs, would get a ginger cake. Mittie most always got the cake. Her older brothers and sisters were treated very rough, whipped often and hard. She said she hated to think, much less talk about their awful treatment. When she was old enough, she would have to spin the wool for her mistress, who wove the cloth to make the family clothes. She also learned to knit, and after supper would knit until bedtime. She remembers once an old woman slave had displeased her master about something. He had a pit dug, and boards placed over the...

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Slave Narrative of Rosaline Rogers

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Rosaline Rogers Location: Indianapolis, Indiana Place of Birth: South Carolina Date of Birth: 1827 Age: 100 Place of Residence: 910 North Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana FOLKLORE MRS. ROSALINE ROGERS-EX-SLAVE-110 YEARS OLD 910 North Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Mrs. Rogers was born in South Carolina, in 1827, a slave of Dr. Rice Rogers, “Mas. Rogers,” we called him, was the youngest son of a family of eleven children. He was so very mean. Mrs. Rogers was sold and taken to Tennessee at the age of eleven for $900.00 to a man by the name of Carter. Soon after her arrival at the Carter plantation, she was resold to a man by the name of Belby Moore with whom she lived until the beginning of the Civil war. Men and women were herded into a single cabin, no matter how many there were. She remembers a time when there were twenty slaves in a small cabin. There were holes between the logs of the cabin, large enough for dogs and cats to crawl through. The only means of heat, being a wood fireplace, which, of course, was used for cooking their food. The slaves’ food was corn cakes, side pork, and beans; seldom any sweets except molasses. The slaves...

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Slave Narrative of John H. Gibson

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: John Henry Gibson Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Scott County, N. C. Place of Residence: Colton Street Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE JOHN HENRY GIBSON-EX-SLAVE Colton Street John Henry Gibson was born a slave, many years ago, in Scott County, N.C. His old master, John Henry Bidding, was a wealthy farmer; he also owned the hotel, or rooming house. When court was in session the “higher ups” would come to this house, and stay until the court affairs were settled. Mr. Bidding, who was very kind to his slaves, died when John Gibson was very young. All slaves and other property passed on to the son, Joseph Bidding, who in turn was as kind as his father had been. Gibson’s father belonged to General Lee Gibson, who was a neighboring farmer. He saw and met Miss Elizabeth Bidding’s maid; they liked each other so very much, Miss Elizabeth bought him from General Gibson, and let him have her maid as his wife. The wife lived only a short time, leaving a little boy. After the Civil war, a white man, by the name of Luster, was comming to Ohio, brought John Gibson with him. They came to Indianapolis, and Gibson liked it so well, he decided to remain; Mr. Luster told him if...

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Slave Narrative of John W. Fields

Interviewer: Cecil Miller Person Interviewed: John W. Fields Location: Lafayette, Indiana Place of Birth: Owensburg, KY Date of Birth: March 27, 1848 Age: 89 Place of Residence: N. 20th St., Lafayette, Indiana Cecil C. Miller Dist. #3 Tippecanoe Co. INTERVIEW WITH MR. JOHN W. FIELDS, EX-SLAVE OF CIVIL WAR PERIOD September 17, 1937 John W. Fields, 2120 North Twentieth Street, Lafayette, Indiana, now employed as a domestic by Judge Burnett is a typical example of a fine colored gentleman, who, despite his lowly birth and adverse circumstances, has labored and economized until he has acquired a respected place in his home community. He is the owner of three properties; un-mortgaged, and is a member of the colored Baptist Church of Lafayette. As will later be seen his life has been one of constant effort to better himself spiritually and physically. He is a fine example of a man who has lived a morally and physically clean life. But, as for his life, I will let Mr. Fields speak for himself: “My name is John W. Fields and I’m eighty-nine (89) years old. I was born March 27, 1848 in Owensburg, Ky. That’s 115 miles below Louisville, Ky. There was 11 other children besides myself in my family. When I was six years old, all of us children were taken from my parents, because my master died and his estate...

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Slave Narrative of Sarah C. Colbert

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Sarah Colbert Location: Indianapolis, Indiana Place of Birth: Allen County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1855 Place of Residence: 1505 North Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. SARAH COLBERT-EX-SLAVE 1505 North Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Mrs. Sarah Carpenter Colbert was born in Allen County, Kentucky in 1855. She was owned by Leige Carpenter, a farmer. Her father, Isaac Carpenter was the grandson of his master, Leige Carpenter, who was very kind to him. Isaac worked on the farm until the old master’s death. He was then sold to Jim McFarland in Frankfort Kentucky. Jim’s wife was very mean to the slaves, whipped them regularly every morning to start the day right. One morning after a severe beating, Isaac met an old slave, who asked him why he let his mistress beat him so much. Isaac laughed and asked him what he could do about it. The old man told him if he would bite her foot, the next time she knocked him down, she would stop beating him and perhaps sell him. The next morning he was getting his regular beating, he willingly fell to the floor, grabbed his mistress’ foot, bit her very hard. She tried very hard to pull away from him, he held on still biting, she...

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Slave Narrative of Julia Bowman

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Julia Bowman Location: Indianapolis, Indiana Place of Birth: Woodford County KY Date of Birth: 1850 Place of Residence: 1210 North West Street, Indianapolis, Indiana Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana FOLKLORE MRS. JULIA BOWMAN-EX-SLAVE 1210 North West Street, Indianapolis, Indiana Mrs. Bowman was born in Woodford County, Kentucky in 1859. Her master, Joel W. Twyman was kind and generous to all of his slaves, and he had many of them. The Twyman slaves were always spoken of, as the Twyman “Kinfolks.” All slaves worked hard on the large farm, as every kind of vegetation was raised. They were given some of everything that grew on the farm, therefore there was no stealing to get food. The master had his own slaves, and the mistress had her own slaves, and all were treated very kindly. Mrs. Bowman was taken into the Twyman “big house,” at the age of six, to help the mistress in any way she could. She stayed in the house until slavery was abolished. After freedom, the old master was taken very sick and some of the former slaves were sent for, as he wanted some of his “Kinfolks” around him when he died. Interviewer’s Comment Mrs. Bowman was given the Twyman family bible where her birth is recorded with the...

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Slave Narrative of Joseph Mosley

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Joseph Mosley Location: Indianapolis, Indiana Place of Birth: March 15, 1853 Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana FOLKLORE JOSEPH MOSLEY, EX-SLAVE 2637 Boulevard Place [TR: Also reported as Moseley in text of interview.] Joseph Mosley, one of twelve children, was born March 15, 1853, fourteen miles from Hopkinsville, Kentucky. His master, Tim Mosley, was a slave trader. He was supposed to have bought and sold 10,000 slaves. He would go from one state to another buying slaves, bringing in as many as 75 or 80 slaves at one time. The slaves would be handcuffed to a chain, each chain would link 16 slaves. The slaves would walk from Virginia to Kentucky, and some from Mississippi to Virginia. In front of the chained slaves would be an overseer on horseback with a gun and dogs. In back of the chained slaves would be another overseer on horseback with a gun and dogs. They would see that no slave escaped. Joseph’s father was the shoemaker for all the farm hands and all adult workers. He would start in September making shoes for the year. First the shoes for the folks in the house, then the workers. No slave child ever wore shoes, summer or winter. The father, mother, and all the children were slaves in...

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Slave Narrative of George Washington Buckner

Interviewer: Lauana Creel Person Interviewed: Dr. George Washington Buckner Location: Evansville, Indiana Date of Birth: December 1st, 1852 Ex-Slave Stories District #5 Vanderburgh County Lauana Creel A SLAVE, AMBASSADOR AND CITY DOCTOR [DR. GEORGE WASHINGTON BUCKNER] This paper was prepared after several interviews had been obtained with the subject of this sketch. Dr. George Washingtin [TR: Washington] Buckner, tall, lean, whitehaired, genial and alert, answered the call of his door bell. Although anxious to oblige the writer and willing to grant an interview, the life of a city doctor is filled with anxious solicitation for others and he is always expecting a summons to the bedside of a patient or a professional interview has been slated. Dr. Buckner is no exception and our interviews were often disturbed by the jingle of the door bell or a telephone call. Dr. Buckner’s conversation lead in ever widening circles, away from the topic under discussion when the events of his own life were discussed, but he is a fluent speaker and a student of psychology. Psychology as that philosophy relates to the mental and bodily tendencies of the African race has long since become one of the major subjects with which this unusual man struggles. “Why is the negro?” is one of his deepest concerns. Dr. Buckner’s first recollections center within a slave cabin in Kentucky. The cabin was the home of...

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Slave Narrative of William M. Quinn

Interviewer: Henry Jackson Person Interviewed: William M. Quinn Location: Indianapolis, Indiana Place of Birth: Hardin County, Kentucky Place of Residence: 431 Bright Street, Indianapolis, Indiana Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Harry Jackson WILLIAM M. QUINN (EX-SLAVE) 431 Bright Street, Indianapolis, Ind. William M. Quinn, 431 Bright street, was a slave up to ten years of age-“when the soldiers come back home, and the war was over, and we wasn’t slaves anymore”. Mr. Quinn was born in Hardin County, Kentucky, on a farm belonging to Steve Stone. He and a brother and his mother were slaves of “Old Master Stone”, but his father was owned by another man, Mr. Quinn, who had an adjoining farm. When they were all freed, they took the surname of Quinn. Mr. Quinn said that they were what was called “gift slaves”. They were never to be sold from the Stone farm and were given to Stone’s daughter as a gift with that understanding. He said that his “Old master paid him and his brother ten cents a day for cutting down corn and shucking it.” It was very unusual for a slave to receive any money whatsoever for working. He said that his master had a son about his age, and the son and he and his brother worked around the farm together, and “Master Stone” gave all three...

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Slave Narrative of Callie Bracey

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Callie Bracey Location: Indianapolis, Indiana Place of Residence: 414 Blake Street Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana FOLKLORE MRS. CALLIE BRACEY-DAUGHTER [of Louise Terrell] 414 Blake Street Mrs. Callie Bracey’s mother, Louise Terrell, was bought, when a child, by Andy Ramblet, a farmer, near Jackson, Miss. She had to work very hard in the fields from early morning until as late in the evening, as they could possibly see. No matter how hard she had worked all day after coming in from the field, she would have to cook for the next day, packing the lunch buckets for the field hands. It made no difference how tired she was, when the horn was blown at 4 a.m., she had to go into the field for another day of hard work. The women had to split rails all day long, just like the men. Once she got so cold, her feet seemed to be frozen; when they warmed a little, they had swollen so, she could not wear her shoes. She had to wrap her foot in burlap, so she would be able to go into the field the next day. The Ramblets were known for their good butter. They always had more than they could use. The master wanted the slaves to have...

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