Location: Marblehead Massachusetts

Old Marblehead Sea Captains

This volume is intended to be a fairly accurate list of the Old Sea Captains of Marblehead, and the vessels in which they sailed, going to and from foreign ports. The information contained in this volume has been obtained by careful and persistent research from widely distributed sources viz: the Marblehead and Salem and Beverly Custom House Records, original books of the Marblehead Marine Insurance Company, covering five thousand policies running from 1800 to 1840, list of Marblehead Soldiers and Sailors in the Revolutionary War (compiled in 1912-13 by the author), old log books, old letter books, old newspapers, list of Privateersmen of 1812 made up by Capt. Glover Broughton in a memorial to the 34th, 35th and 36th Congresses asking for grants of land for services rendered, and from the descendants of the men mentioned.

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Biography of Colonel Henry Curtis

One of the prominent citizens of Rock Island, and a man of high standing in the legal profession, was Colonel Henry Curtis, deceased. He was born at Boston, Massachusetts, August 13, 1834, the home of his parents. Henry and Rebecca L. (Everett) Curtis, and in that city he spent his boyhood and received his preliminary education. This was finished by a course in the English High School of his native city, which fitted him for entrance into the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute at Troy, New York, where he pursued an engineering course, and graduated in 1855 as a civil engineer. In 1856 Mr. Curtis came to Rock Island, where, one year later, December 15, 1857, he married Lucy R. Osborn, the daughter of Marcus B. Osborn. He continued his practice as a civil engineer in Rock Island until October 8, 1860, when, having fitted himself for the legal profession, he was admitted to the Rock Island County Bar. Upon taking up the practice of his new profession, Mr. Curtis entered into partnership with his brother-in-law, Charles M. Osborn, under the firm name of Osborn & Curtis, and this partner-ship continued until 1880, when it was dissolved, Mr. Osborn removing to Chicago and Mr. Curtis continuing in the practice alone until his death. During the continuance of the firm they were attorneys for the Rock Island Road. In 1887 Mr. Curtis...

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The Haskell Family

ROGER, WILLIAM, and MARK HASKELL, three brothers, are undoubtedly the patriarchal heads of the Haskell family of New England and are found to be very early settlers at Beverly, where Roger had twenty acres of land granted him by the town of Salem, in 1636—probably located not far from Essex Bridge. In 1643 John Hardy made application for a 10 acre lot for his son Joseph, “about the Bass River,’’ and at the same time interceded for a grant of meadow land for Roger Haskell; and the selectmen gave him six acres. In 1646 Roger Haskell and William Dodge were appointed a committee “to call upon the neighbors about Bass River head to mend the two bridges which were decayed, being the Country way, and the way which was formerly made leading from Joe Porters farm to Wenham.” In 1655 Roger was on the jury, and in 1657 chosen constable for Cape Ann side. (1) ROGER HASKIELL1 was born in England in 1613, and died in Beverly in 1667. (For will see Appendix.) He married, first, a daughter of John and Abigail Stone, of Beverly; m. second, Elizabeth, dau. of John and Elizabeth Hardy, of the same town. Mr. Hardy d. 1652, and mentions in his will son-in-law Roger Haskell and his four children, John, William, Mark and Elizabeth. He was a mariner, engaged in the fishing business, and...

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Michael and Ruth (Rhoades) White

(9) MICHAEL3 (Michael2 Henry1), born March 22, 1668-9; d. July 26, 1730. He was a witness to a nuncupative will made between Thomas Rhoades, of Marblehead, and John Simpson, on board the ship Essex, at Sea, where in it was agreed that if during the voyage, the survivor should have what clothes, wages, &c. the other was possessed of at his decease. “The said Sampson was slain during the voyage,” and administration was granted said Rhoades, May 26, 1696. Mr. Coombs was a member of St. Michael’s church (Episcopal), at Marblehead. He m. July 12, 1694, Ruth Rhoades. Six Children— 11. JOANNA4 bapt. May 19, 1695 m. Dec. 29, 17 15, Benjamin Girdler. 12. RICHARD4 bapt. Feb. 14, 1696—7 13. JOSHUA4 bapt. June 11, 1699; will proved Feb. 27, 1764. The inventory, which fills two long closely-written pages, was £1,250 12s. 6¾d. Member of’ St. Michael’s Church, Marblehead; m. Jan. 29, 1721, Mary Goree 14. MICHAEL4 b. Feb. 28, 1702—3; m. first, March 12, 1721—5, Remember, dau. of Thomas and Susanna (Grant) White, bapt. June 25, 1704, d. about 1735. (See White Family, No. 14.) He was great grandson of Henry Coombs, whose dau. Susannah married Francis Grant, and whose dau. Susannah married said Thomas White, Mr. Coombs m. second, June 2, 1737, widow Mary Kelley. Five children by Remember: —— Mary5 bapt. Dec. 11, 1726. MICHAEL5 bapt. Feb....

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Henry Coombs of Marblehead

A brief notice of this family is here given, to more clearly show its relative connection with that of the White and Haskell Families, and which is interwoven with them from the first to almost the last generation in a remarkable degree. To this end it is not necessary to give more than a mere outline of its history, making use of such names as will serve to connect each family of the several lines or branches. (1) HENRY COOMBS1 was of Marblehead as early as Dec. 22, 1648, when he with others had lots laid out in the swamp. April 11, 1653, he sold a cow lease to John Legg, and in 1656 was chosen “way warden.” In 1661 ho had temporary charge of the Ferry, at which place he appears to have lived. In 1667 a complaint was made against him for uttering slanderous reports concerning Rev. Mr. Walton, of Marblehead, in saying that “ he preached nothing but lies, and be could prove him to be a knave.” (Co. Ct. Rec.) The inventory of his estate was taken Sept. 16, 1669, by Henry Bartholomew, Moses Maverick, and Hilliard. Fishermam. He m. Elizabeth _______. Administration was granted on her estate June 13, 1709, to her son in law “Francis Grant, and wife Susannah, one of the daughters of the deceased,” who gave bonds with James Hawkins and...

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