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Location: Malheur County OR

Biography of Thomas C. Fletcher

One of the earliest pioneers of this region of the country, a man whose life has always been dominated by wisdom prudence and upright principles,. having ever manifested also stanch virtues and a reliability that are becoming a good citizen and faithful man, the subject of this article is vie of the leading men of Malheur County, and a prominent resident of Ontario. Thomas C. was born in Mercer County, Kentucky, on October 11, 1841, being the son of Jewett and Elizabeth Fletcher. When our subject was six years of age he had the misfortune to lose his father and he was soon thereafter taken by his mother to Lee County, Iowa, near Ft. Madison where he was reared on a farm attend the Common schools for his education. In the fall of 1861 when the stirring call came for men to defend the nation’s honor and save her from the assault of treason’s bards, he promptly enlisted in Company G Fourth Iowa Calvalry as bugler and was under General Curtis. Several skirmishes were participated in Missouri and then he was transferred to Sherman’s army Sixteenth Corps, being immediately under% 9A. J. Smith. He was in siege of Vicksburg and on account of sickness was sent home on a furlough, but after recovering was seen again in the ranks and took part in the battle of Ripley, Meridian, and...

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Biography of Hon. William Rufus King

Among those granted representation in this volume, none is more worthy of notice, than the subject of this sketch. As a public spirited citizen he enjoys the confidence of the people and has become well and popularly known, not only throughout Malheur and adjoining counties, but throughout the whole state. On October 3. 1864, near Walla Walla. Washington, David R. King and Elizabeth (Estes) King, became the parents of a boy, whom they named William Rufus. His parents were pioneers of Walla Walla, Washington. Arriving from Arkansas in 1860 his father being captain of a large immigrant train, crossing what was known as “the plains”-the journey being through the dangerous Indian countries between the Mississippi and the Pacific coast. At the age of nine years he moved with his parents to Weston, Oregon, and five years later, in 1878, to Jordan Valley, in this County. After receiving his preliminary education in the common schools, he entered the Agricultural College, at Corvallis, Oregon, where he pursued his studies for three years. He re-turned again to the farm, but in 1889 left it to take up the study of law at the law school in Danville, Indiana. After graduating with high honors in 1891, he was admitted to practice by the supreme court of Indiana, and entered a law office in the city of Indianapolis. H remained there but a few...

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Biographical Sketch of Roswell W. Clement

Among the leading agriculturists of Malheur county is to be mentioned the subject of this sketch, whose life has manifested a worthy record of honest and rigorous endeavor, dominated with sagacity and tempered with prudence and display of affability and genial bearing toward all. In Middleville, Barry county, Michigan, on January 5, 1862, occurred the happy event of the birth of Roswell W. Clement, his parents being Judge James T. and Lucy (Hayes) Clement. The family came to Usage, Iowa, while our subject was a small child, and thence they removed to the vicinity of Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1868. In these various places Roswell W. was reared, receiving a good education from the common schools. 1881 marks the date when they again removed toward the west, this time journeying with teams, one of which our subject drove the entire distance, to Payette, Idaho, making the trip in eighty days. Here on September 11. 1884, Mr. Clement married Miss Harriet, daughter of John and Melissa Neal, and a native of Denver, Colorado. Mr. and Mrs. Neal were early pioneers of the Payette Valley, coming thither from Denver, in which town they also were among the first settlers and lived there when flour retailed at fifty dollars per sack. To Mr. and Mrs. Clement there have been born four children named as follows: Martha Ethel, James R., Walter and Buell J....

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Biographical Sketch of David Dunbar

In the person of the subject of this sketch we have one of the leading citizens and stockmen of Malheur County, and it is with pleasure that we chronicle the salient paints in his interesting and active career, wherein he has ever manifested integrity, ability and industry. David Dunbar was born in Ontario, Canada, near Kingston, on February 5, 1849, being the son of James and Eliza Dunbar. He was reared on a farm with his parents and gained his education from the common schools of that province. In July 186? he was called to mourn the death of his mother and in the fall of that same year stood forth from the parental roof to do battle with the forces of this world alone. He went to New York and thence by steamer to San Francisco arriving in that city in thirty days. He worked during the winter on the Union Pacific railroad at Truckee, Nevada. Sometime after this he joined a wagon train and made his way to the Idaho Basin. This was in 1867 and he mined for a time and then freighted from Relton, Utah to Silver City, Idaho after which he purchased a band of horses and took them to Montana and sold them, purchasing a band of stock and work cattle. These he brought back to Silver City, selling the cattle for work...

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Biography of Robert M. Divin

This venerable citizen and esteemed gentleman and resident of Vale is one of the substantial men of Malheur County and is well and favorably known throughout the precincts of this region, being a man of stanch integrity, and always manifesting those qualities of worth and merit that redound to the good of all. Mr. Divin was born in Lincoln County, Tennessee, on December 17, 1831, being the son of Irbin F. and Hannah Divin. The father died when our subject was two years of age, having removed with the family to Washington County, Arkansas, where the death occurred. There were but few settlers in that section then, and there Robert M. lived and attended school in the rough log houses of the time, gaining a training there from which fortified him for the battle of life. He remained with his mother until he had reached the age of manhood, and in 151 he married Miss Mary J. Kellam, a native of Little Rock, Arkansas. He was occupied on a farm until 186o, then removed to the frontier of Texas among the savage Commanche Indians. Here Mr. Divin and his family endured hardships and deprivations and sufferings from the savages that are calculated to dry up the cup of joy from the human breast, but they bravely fought their way through them all. The father for three years being a...

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Biographical Sketch of Charlie E. Amidon

This well known and representative farmer and stockman is a substantial and enterprising citizen of Malheur County, dwelling near Ontario, five and one-half miles southwest, where he has a fine farm of one hundred and eighty acres, well tilled and improved with buildings, orchards, and so forth in addition to which he owns one hundred acres of land in another place, besides other property. The birth of Mr. Amidon occurred at Flenn, Allegan County, Michigan in 1860, August 23, being the son of Edson and Electa (Tracy) Amidon. The father enlisted in Company B, Thirteenth Michigan in October, 1861. He was transferred to Sherman’s Army and was with that celebrity on the famous march to the sea. Before going, he was home on a furlough, on account of the measles. Upon his return to the army after his furlough he was promoted as corporal and he did valiant service in the battles of Chattanooga, Chickamauga, Atlanta, and many others as well as numerous skirmishes. He served until the last disloyal gun was silenced, and then received his honorable discharge, after four years of war toil. Our subject was reared on a farm educated in the common schools and at the age of twelve went with his parents to Grand Island, Nebraska. Two years later the family returned to Wayne County, Michigan and from there he went to Flenn, his...

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Biographical Sketch of George W. Clinton

A veritable pioneer of the pioneers, and a man of sterling qualities of worth and substantiality, while his excellent achievements mark him one possessed of more than ordinary ability for business enterprises, the subject of this article is to be mentioned with the prominent men of Malheur County and is well worthy of the prestige and esteem that he enjoys. Mr. Clinton was born in New York, in 1837, being the son of Alexander and Margaret (Balfour) Clinton, natives respectively of Maryland and Pennsylvania. In 1844 the family removed to Wisconsin, and in 1859 they took up the arduous journey across the dreary plains beset with great danger and hardship. In due time they arrived at the Sacramento valley and there engaged in farming. In 1864 our subject made his way into the wilds of this country, locating first at Silver City, then coming to the place where Jordan Valley now stands. He located land and went to raising stock and farming. For twenty-four years he labored on and then sold his possessions and for a period afterward his time was equally divided between this place and California. At the time of the Indian outbreak in 1863 he lost heavily, the savages stealing his horses. The parents of our subject both died in California and also all of a family of eight children but George W. At the present...

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Biographical Sketch of Henry S. Eldredge

The subject of this article has done much toward the industrial development of Malheur county, and is one of the prominent business men in the town of Vale at the present time, being owner and operator of the Glen livery barn, where he has fine, large rigs and good stock, taking an especial care for the comfort and welfare of his patrons; he owns and operates the blacksmith shop, having also a large tract of land in the vicinity of the town, while in all these enterprises he manifests a commendable business sagacity, a worthy integrity and maintains an unsullied reputation among his fellows. Mr. Eldredge was born near Northfield, Minnesota, On May 23, 1862, being the son of Charles K. and Cornelia E. (Carter) Eldredge. While still a child he was taken by his parents to Beaver Falls, in his native state, and there the father followed milling. Our subject was educated in the graded schools and in 1882 he came with his father to the west, traveling through by train to Granger and thence by teams to Baker City and passing through this portion of Malheur. In Baker City Henry S. learned the blacksmith trade and more or less during the time from that date until the present he has been engaged in the king of all trades. In various places he has wrought at the forge,...

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Biographical Sketch of Almer G. King

The subject of this review is one of the well known and representative men of Malheur County and is to-day entrusted with the responsibilities of one of the main County offices and has made a record for himself of faithfulness, integrity, and capabilities, that places him secure in the esteem and respect of the entire population of the County. Almer G. was born in Waverly, Iowa, on December 6, 1866, being the son of George and Littie (Kimball) King. In 187o, the family came west via San Francisco and Portland to a place opposite Fort Vancouver, on the Columbia, where they resided for a time and then re-moved to Pendleton, afterwards going to The Dalles in 1872 where they remained until 1882. In that place, our subject was educated in the public schools and then took the entire course in the Vasco Independent Academy, but (lid not graduate as he was detained from passing the examinations.  In 1882 he came to Malheur, at that time a part of Baker County, and engaged to handle cattle for Thomas R. David-son and fourteen years he remained with him never losing a day, and for the last half of this time he was foreman. In 1892 he went to Payette, Idaho, and conducted a livery stable for one year then went to Westfall Malheur County, and operated as a farmer for a...

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Biographical Sketch of James A. Walker

About five miles southwest from Ontario is the farm and home of the subject of this article. It is a place of eighty acres well improved, skillfully tilled, has line buildings, good orchards and a vine-yard, and in connection with the care of this estate, Mr. Walter is operating a dairy and manufacturing a good quality of butter, which is readily sold in the markets. In person Mr. Walter is a man of sound principles, stands well among his fellows, possesses good ability, and has made a success of his labor, starting with his bare hands and now has a good property accumulated. He was born in Wayne county, Indiana, on February 14, 1834, being the son of Henry and Lovier (Lee) Walter. He grew up on a farm, received a good education from the common schools, and remained with his parents until 1880, having removed with them to Henry County, Indiana in 1875. When he stepped out for himself, he came by rail to Reno, Nevada, and in the fall of 1881 came across the country with teams from there to Malheur County, locating in Malheur Valley, and doing his first work as a wage earner in this new country. The settlers were few then and the country open and he selected a farm near where Yale stands, but later closed out the farm business and for three...

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Biographical Sketch of Frank O’Neill

The sturdy pioneer, capable gentleman and patriotic citizen whose, name heads this article is one of the leading agriculturists and stockmen of his section of Malheur County, being a man who has wrought with great energy and commendable wisdom in his efforts to assist in the up building and advancement of this section of the country. Our subject was born in the County of Antrim, Ulster province, Ireland, on May 10, 1846, being the son of John and Elizabeth O’Neill. He was reared on a farm and remained in his native place until 1866, when he went to Scotland, and four years later was in Liverpool, whence on September 23, 1870, he embarked on the “Harvest Queen.” a sailing vessel bound for the United States. After a very rough trip of thirty-eight days he landed in New York, thence to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and one year later went to San Francisco. In Sonoma County, at Visalia, and in Mendocino County, in that state, he labored in the lumber business. In San Francisco, on December 18, 1875, Mr. O’Neill married Mary Mullary, and in 1881 they came to Portland. “thence they journeyed by team to lower Willow creek in Malheur County and located a quarter section, taking up the stock business. Three children were horn to this marriage, Mrs. Annie Zahlor, Mrs. Mary Loran and Francis P. In 1882, very soon...

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Biographical Sketch of Jackson A. Bartlett

This well known and representative business man of the town of Drewsey has a fine hotel, where he does a thriving business and also a large livery and feed stable, being a man of excellent capabilities and one of the prominent figures in this part of Harney county. He was born in Owen county, Indiana, on August 31, 1847, the son of James and Sarah (Alexander) Bartlett. He was reared on a farm and gained his education from the public schools of the vicinity and when he heard the call for troops in the times of fratricidal strife he enlisted in the One Hundred and Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Company B. He was largely on post puty, being in Louisville, Kentucky; Nashville, Tennessee; and Decatur, Alabama. The date of his enlistment was February 14, 1865, and his honorable discharge occurred in October, 1865. He at once returned to his home in Indiana. In 1868 he migrated to Scotland county, Missouri, and there on December 25, 1870, occurred his marriage with Miss Arminta J., daughter of William and Margaret Myers. He followed farming there until 1887, and then with his family of wife and seven children he made the trip across the country to Union county, Oregon. The following year he came to the agency, in the vicinity of Beulah, Malheur county, entered a homestead, improved it and settled to...

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Biography of Thomas J. Huff

One of the pioneers of the northwest and one of the old residents of Caldwell is Thomas Jefferson Huff, the present assessor of Canyon County. He is a man of the highest integrity and ability, and stands well in the estimation of all who know him. A lifelong Democrat, and devoted to his party, he has never occupied a public office before, and has not been an aspirant for political honors and emoluments. In his business career he has met with success, and by well directed energy and good judgment he has amassed a comfortable fortune. Philip Huff, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was born in Germany, and coming to America in early manhood, settled in Tennessee. In that state his son Jefferson, father of Thomas J. Huff, was born, and for some years he made his home in Indiana. He married Lutilda White, and twelve children were born to them. In 1852 the family set out on a long and dangerous journey across the almost interminable plains, seeking for a new home and better prospects. The year was an especially trying one, as the cholera was raging in this country, and the emigrants along the way appeared to be favorite subjects of attack by the dread enemy to life. Four of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Huff succumbed and were buried on the dreary plains. Newly...

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Gurney, Areta Littlejohn – Obituary

Washington Co., OR A graveside service will be at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 10, 1996, in Evergreen Cemetery in Ontario for Areta Gurney, who died Jan. 6 at age 93. Mrs. Gurney was born Oct. 13, 1902 in Pendleton. She taught high school in Marshfield in the 1920s and grade school during the 1960s. In 1976 she moved from Ontario to Portland. She was a member of the Ontario Methodist Church. Surviving are her son, Norris of Portland and one grandchild. The family suggests remembrances to the American Cancer Society. The Oregonian, January 10, 1996 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Fisher, David Cyrus – Obituary

David Cyrus Fisher died at Ontario, Oregon, on Saturday, April 17, 1915, aged 75 years, 7 moths and 8 days. The deceased had gone to Ontario to pay a long deferred visit to his son, Guy Fisher, and shortly after his arrival there he was stricken with his last illness. For a time hopes were entertained for his recovery but he never grew sufficiently strong to return to his home. For many years he had been a resident of the Grande Rode Valley, where he was well and favorably known, and his death is mourned by a large circle of relatives and friends. Surviving him are his wife and children: Mrs. Elizabeth Fisher of Cove, Oregon; Charles Fisher of Union, Oregon; Guy Fisher of Ontario; Otis Fisher and Mrs. Mattie Henley of Portland; Mrs. Leonard Couch of Messrs; Hiram and Harvey Fisher of Wallowa; Mrs. Mary McKennon of Pine Valley, Oregon; and Mrs. Phelma Forman of Ft. Bidwell, California. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Cullison at the home of his foster daughter, Mrs. Cora B. Busick, of this city. Interment was in the Union cemetery. La Grande Newspaper dated April 21, 1915. Contributed by: Michelle...

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