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Location: Madison Wisconsin

Biographical Sketch of Thomas H. Garry

Garry, Thomas H.; lawyer; born, Stratford, Ont., 1868; graduated, University of Wisconsin, class of 1893; married, Cleveland, Jessie Graham; one daughter, Margaret; Asst. United States Atty. Northern District of Ohio, 1904-1910; member law firm Goulder, Day, White & Garry; trustee St. Luke’s Hospital Ass’n; member Athletic...

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Arney, Sally G.

Sally G. Arney died in Portland Feb. 13, 1981. The daughter of Lelah and the late Dr. A. J. Hockett, she was born in Madison, Wisconsin, Nov. 26, 1935. She is survived by her husband Douglas Arney, her mother Lelah Hockett of Portland; sons John Beaudoin of California, Steve Beaudoin of Portland and Wade C. (Corky) Johnson of Bend. Memorials may be made in her name to the American Cancer Society. Wallowa County Chieftain, Thursday February 19, 1981, Page 8 Contributed by: Tom...

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Price, Sylvia Ruth – Obituary

Sylvia Ruth Price, 85, of La Grande, died at her home March 24. A funeral service begins at 10 a.m. Friday at the Seventh-day Adventist Church in La Grande. Loveland Funeral Chapel and Crematory is in charge of arrangements. The eighth of 12 children, Sylvia was born Jan. 5, 1923, to Fredrick and Olive (Crisp) Duneman on a farm near Cresco, Iowa. She and some of her siblings walked 1 1/2 miles to a country school until junior high, then they went to school in town. After her school years she worked at different jobs, doing waitress work and working at the Cresco Hospital. When World War II started, she and her sister Eunice moved to Madison, Wis. After working there for some time, she went with a girlfriend to Denver. Sylvia worked at Remington Arms, a defense plant, until 1945 when the war ended. She then moved back to Cresco, where she met Harvey. They married on Nov. 28, 1945. The couple later moved to Kellogg, Idaho, where their son, Neil, was born on Jan. 20, 1947. They later moved back to Cresco for a few years, then moved to Grundy Center, Iowa, where they bought a short-order café in Morrison. They later sold that and bought one in Grundy Center. They moved to Springfield where they bought and operated an ice cream store for a couple of...

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Olin, John Turner – Obituary

At the residence of his son, C. F. [Charles Forrest] Olin, in the town of Washington, on Dec. 1, 1900, occurred the death of John Turner Olin at the age of 63 years, 10 months and 2 days. The deceased had suffered for some months from a complication of disease, an apoplectic stroke being the immediate cause of his demise. Mr. Olin was born in Delaware County, N.Y., and was the eldest son of George and Mary (Turner) Olin. At the age of nine years he removed with his parents to Iowa and four years later to Wisconsin, settling near Madison, Dane County. Thence to Marquette County in 1851, locating on what was then known as the Menomnee Indian Reservation at that time unsettled and unsurveyed. In 1855 they came to Eau Claire, then Chippewa County, where he has since resided. April 20, 1860 he was united in marriage with Elvira E. Holsted [Halstead], also a native of N. Y. Of the five children born to them, two daughters, Mrs. L. Ellis of Craft, Chippewa County and Mrs. W. Fraser of the town of Washington, and two sons, Chas. F. and John Boyd Olin of the same place, mourn with their widowed mother, the loss of a loving husband and kind father. A brother S. M. Olin is the only surviving member of their generation. Funeral services were held...

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Biography of Charles J. Perkins

Charles J. Perkins, attorney-at-law and an active member of the Southern California bar, came to the State in 1883, and the following year located in practice in San Bernardino. He was born in the Empire State in 1856, but his father, F. J. Perkins, moved with his family from New York to Illinois in the fall of that year, and purchased a farm, on which they settled. In 1877 young Perkins started out in railroad business as an employee in the operating department of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad. At that time train robberies on the western frontier were much more frequent than now, and assaults by desperadoes upon trains supposed to carry valuable treasures were not uncommon. Mr. Perkins had some thrilling experiences with this lawless class. While serving as conductor on that line, he was shot at four different times in one year; and on one occasion observing that the train was not properly controlled, he went forward to the engine and found the engineer and fireman both dead in the cab, having been shot while at their post of duty by men in ambush. He also filled the position of traveling auditor during his connection with the Denver & Rio Grande Company. Deciding to make the legal profession his life-work, Mr. Perkins entered Wisconsin University at Madison and graduated in the law department of that...

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Biography of Rev. R. F. Sweet, D. D.

The old axiom which tells us that kind deeds and gentle words live forever is one which not only inspires the mind with its sublimity, but its truth is so often brought home to us, and so forcibly that it affords a solace we do not always feel. A noble life invariably begets its full measure of love and veneration, and even though myriads of kindness done and self-sacrificing efforts are lost to earth the hand-maidens of the Great Seer of Heaven have the fullest knowledge of them all. All men who have been so graciously endowed with that most precious of all human attributes-love for his fellow-men-have been amply repaid for their self-obligation, generosity and charity; for their weakness, submissiveness and obedience to the mandates of the Deity. This truism was abundantly exemplified during the lifetime of Reverend R. F. Sweet, and substantiated by the wealth of love which his memory impels. Instead of donning the robes and authority of a bishop an elevation twice proffered him, Mr. Sweet preferred to retain the modest position of rector, so that he could more generally and more frequently minister to humanity; unassuming to the extreme, he nevertheless accomplished in-conceivable good and lightened numerous burdens worldly and spiritual, and was con-tent to reap the harvest of brotherly love which was his, rather than hoard sordid accumulations. Even this brief reflection of...

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Biography of W. E. Taylor, M. D.

Placed at the head of a great state charitable institution, carrying the responsibility for the welfare of hundreds of unfortunates whose reason has been shattered and imbued with an earnest desire to restore his unfortunate charges to health and friends, stands Doctor W. E. Taylor, superintendent of the Illinois Western Hospital for the Insane at Watertown. He was born at Waukesha, Wisconsin, May 24, 1854, where his parents, E. T. and Esibell (Irving) Taylor resided. Here his boyhood was spent, and after thoroughly fitting him-self in preparatory schools, he entered the University of Wisconsin, and upon completing a course in that institution, took up the study of medicine at the Hahnemann Medical College at Chicago, from which he graduated. After his graduation, he began the practice of his chosen profession at Monmouth, Illinois, and remained in that city until his appointment as superintendent of the Watertown Hospital for the Insane in 1897, which position he still holds. August 5, 1879, he was married to Miss Vagima McCleary, and of this union two sons have been born, Don and Mac Taylor. Dr. Taylor is a Republican and is prominent in the councils of his party, not merely locally, but throughout the State of Illinois. During the time he resided in Monmouth, he was at the head of the health department of that city for ten years, and was mayor of...

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Biography of Harris Winfield Hutchinson

Harris Winfield Hutchinson, deputy state grain inspector at Hutchinson, had been in the grain business the greater part of his active life and had as many and diverse qualifications for his present position as any one could ask. While he had lived at Hutchinson only a few years, he feels that the town had some specially intimate associations for him. It will be recalled that Hutchinson, Kansas, was established in 1871 and named for C. C. Hutchinson. A brother of this Kansas man, Asa Hutchinson, also founded the Town of Hutchinson, Minnesota. Mr. H. W. Hutchinson is related to both of these men. Harris Winfield Hutchinson was born at Madison, Wisconsin, November 3, 1861. His father, Capt. Martin Van Buren Hutchinson, was born at Montpelier, Vermont, in 1834, and his parents removed to Wisconsin about 1846, when Wisconsin was still a territory. They located at Packwaukee, where he was reared. He married at Waterloo, Wisconsin, and in 1861, at the outbreak of the Civil war, enlisted with a Wisconsin regiment of infantry and was throughout the entire struggle. He was through the Vicksburg campaign and many other battles and engagements, and after the war was sent to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, as captain in another regiment to quell an Indian uprising. Following the war he returned to Waterloo, Wisconsin, and was engaged in the grain business there. In 1889 he...

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Julian, Marland R. “Marv” – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Marland R. “Marv” Julian, 65, of Baker City June 28, 2002, at his home. His memorial service will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 2177 First St. He was born Aug. 7, 1936, in Springdale, Ark. He was a son of Clyde Julian and Rhetta Grace “Mulkey” Julian. He attended high school at Shreveport, La. He entered the U.S. Air Force and was a weather officer from 1954 to 1958. He was based at Goose Bay, Labrador. After his discharge from the service, he worked in restaurants at Buffalo, N.Y., and Madison, Wis., learning Danish and German cooking. He then took a position opening up restaurants in the new Holiday Inn chain, which took him to Hollywood and eventually into Portland where he became chef of The Mayfair House and Jenos for many years. “Marv” was chef at the Baker Hotel in its heyday in the ’60s. He managed the Longview, Wash., Elks Club in the 1970s before returning to Baker City in the early 1980s where he opened a restaurant equipment and janitorial supply business. He traveled to Eastern Oregon and Southern Idaho communities from Pocatello, Idaho, to Hood River. He loved selling almost as much as he loved cooking for people. He was a member of Baker Elks Lodge, No. 338, and St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church. He will be greatly...

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