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Location: Madison Indiana

Higbee Graveyard Madison Indiana

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now This is an historical transcription of Higbee Cemetery, Madison, Jefferson County, Indiana which was transcribed in 1941 as part of the WPA cemetery transcription project. The value of this transcription is that in many cases they transcribed headstones which may today no longer exist. Had it not been for this project, created to provide employment opportunities during the depression, these records may have been lost due to the natural regression of cemeteries. Many of the cemeteries may be known by a different name today, we use...

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Slave Narrative of Mrs. Preston

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: G. Monroe Person Interviewed: Mrs. Preston Location: Madison, Indiana Age: 83 Place of Residence: North Elm Street, Madison, Indiana G. Monroe Dist. 4 Jefferson County SLAVE STORY MRS. PRESTON’S STORY Mrs. Preston is an old lady, 83 years old, very charming and hospitable She lives on North Elm Street, Madison, Indiana. Her first recollections of slavery were of sleeping on the foot of her mistress’ bed, where she could get up during the night to “feed” the fire with chips she had gathered before dark or to get a drink or anything else her mistress might want in the night. Her ‘Marse Brown’, resided in Frankfort having taken his best horses and hogs, and leaving his family in the care of an overseer on a farm. He was afraid the Union soldiers would kill him, but thought his wife would be safe. This opinion proved to be true. The overseer called the slaves to work at four o’clock, and they worked until six in the evening. When Mrs. Preston was a little older part of her work was to drive about a dozen cows to and from the stable. Many a time she warmed her bare feet in the cattle bedding. She said they did not always go barefooted but their shoes were old or...

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Slave Narrative of Jack Simms

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now G. Monroe Dist. 4 Jefferson County Interviewer: G. Monroe Person Interviewed: Jack Simms Location: Madison, Indiana Place of Birth: Kentucky SLAVE STORY MR. JACK SIMMS’ STORY Personal Interview Mr. Simms was born and raised on Mill Creek Kentucky, and now lives in Madison Indiana on Poplar Street diagonally North West of the hospital. He was so young he did no remember very much about how the slaves were treated, but seemed to regret very much that he had been denied the privilege of an education. Mr. Simms remembers seeing the lines of soldiers on the Campbellsburg road, but referred to the war as the “Revolution War”. This was a very interesting old man, when we first called, his daughter invited us into the house, but her father wanted to talk outside where he “spit better”. When his daughter conveyed this information Mr. Simms’ immediately decided that we could come in as we “wouldn’t be there long anyhow”. After we gained entrance, the daughter remarked that her father was very young at the time of the war, whereupon he answered very testily “If you are going to tell it, go ahead. Or am I going to tell...

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Slave Narrative of Lizzie Johnson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Lizzie Johnson Location: Biscoe, Arkansas Place of Birth: Holly Springs, Mississippi Age: 65 Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. LIZZIE JOHNSON 706 North Senate Avenue, Apt. 1 Mrs. Johnson’s father, Arthur Locklear, was born in Wilmington, N.C. in 1822. He lived in the South and endured many hardships until 1852. He was very fortunate in having a white man befriend him in many ways. This man taught him to read and write. Many nights after a hard days work, he would lie on the floor in front of the fireplace, trying to study by the light from the blazing wood, so he might improve his reading and writing. He married very young, and as his family increased, he became ambitious for them. Knowing their future would be very dark if they remained South. He then started a movement to come north. There were about twenty-six or twenty-eight men and women, who had the same thoughts about their children, banded together, and in 1852 they started for somewhere, North. The people selected, had to be loyal to the cause of their children’s future lives, morally clean, truthful, and hard-working. Some had oxen, some had carts. They pooled all of their scant...

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Biography of Henry A. Smith, M.D.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Dr. Henry A. Smith, physician and surgeon of St. Louis and also the president and medical director of the People’s Life & Accident Insurance Company, a Missouri corporation, was born in Madison, Jefferson county, Indiana, September 16, 1857. He was educated in the public schools of Madison and pursued his medical course in the American Medical College, an Eclectic School of St. Louis, from which he was graduated with the M. D. degree in 1905. Various experiences, however, had come to him ere he prepared for his present profession. At the age of fourteen years he started out to earn his own living and was apprenticed by his father to the drug business, which he continued to follow successfully for a decade. During the succeeding ten years of his life he was connected with the Wabash Railroad Company at Moberly, Missouri, acting as chief clerk for five years in the yardmaster’s office and later as assistant chief clerk In the office of the master car builder. When twenty-eight years of age he entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, and served as an ordained clergy man in the Missouri conference. He is still active as a local elder in that church. On the 1st of August, 1898, he removed to St. Louis and became...

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Biography of William A. Quigley

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now William A. Quigley. A varied and eventful career had been that of Mr. Quigley, the efficient and popular cashier of the Kansas National Gas Company in the offices of this corporation at Independence, Montgomery County. Mr. Quigley claims the old Hoosier State as the place of his nativity, was there reared and educated and it was given him to represent that commonwealth as one of the valiant soldiers of the Union during the major portion of the Civil war. His activities in the business world have been diversified and he had been a resident of Kansas for the past thirty years. His paternal grandfather was born in Pennsylvania and passed the closing years of his life near Cincinnati, Ohio, where he settled in 1816 in the pioneer days. The original American progenitors of the Quigley family came from Ireland and settled in Pennsylvania prior to the war of the Revolution. William A. Quigley was born in Jefferson County, Indiana, on the 19th of July, 1842, and is a son of Hiram and Melvina (White) Quigley, the former of whom was born near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in 1812, and the latter of whom was born in Jefferson County, Indiana, in 1823. Hiram Quigley was about four years old when his parents removed from Pennsylvania and settled near the...

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Biography of Lewis Hanback

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Lewis Hanback. In the summer of 1865, soon after the close of the Civil war, in which he had played a gallant part as a Union officer, Lewis Hanback came to Topeka to practice law. For many years he was one of the eminent members of the Kansas bar, and he was not less well known and esteemed in public affairs. He was one of the makers of Kansas history during the last half century. He was born at Winchester, Scott County, Illinois, March 27, 1839. He was the oldest of the six children of William and Ann Hanback. His father was a portrait painter by occupation and he frequently changed his place of residence. From Winchester the family went to Quincy, Illinois, where they remained until 1844. Subsequently they lived at Madison, Indiana, in Switzerland County, Indiana, and then returned to Adams County, Illinois, near Quincy, where William Hanback died May 1, 1855, and his wife in March, 1856. The death of the parents broke up the family and the children became separated. Lewis Hanback was seventeen years old when his mother died. He went to work as a farm hand and continued to be so occupied until 1860. He had had but meager advantages as a scholar but by persistent effort he mustered the...

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Biographical Sketch of Ira B. Jackson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Ira B. Jackson, insurance agent, Mattoon; was born in Madison, Jefferson Co., Ind., Oct. 31, 1851; in 1855, his father removed with his family to Illinois, and settled in Sangamon Co., near Springfield; his early life was that of a farmer’s boy; he acquired a good common-school education; at the age of 18, he engaged in the business of photograph artist, which he followed two years; in 1872, he completed a business course in the Commercial College, at Terre Haute, Ind.; in 1874, he engaged in the grocery trade with Fallin Bros., under the firm name of Fallin Bros. & Jackson; in 1876, he retired from the firm and engaged in the fire insurance business; he at present represents one accident and sixteen leading fire insurance companies in Coles and Effingham Cos., aggregating in assets over $30,000,000 ;he also represents the Great Western Dispatch Co. He was married May 26, 1874, to Laura I. Carter, a native of Indiana; has one child-Georgia. He is at present, serving his second term of office as City and also Township...

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Biographical Sketch of Randall Alexander

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Randall Alexander, breeder and shipper of Poland-China swine, Charleston; about ten years ago this gentleman, in company with S. M. Shepard, made his first start in the introduction and breeding of thorough-bred swine in Coles Co. After having experimented thoroughly with the various breeds of hogs, they became convinced that the Poland-China possessed all the requisites of size, docility, fertility, early maturity, aptitude for taking on flesh, and great constitutional vigor, necessary to render it pre-eminently the hog for the farmer. From a small beginning, the business has grown to its present proportions. Mr. Alexander is now one of the most prominent breeders in the State; his trade extends to every part of the country, to the Pacific Coast, Canada, the Southern States, etc.; his farm, near Charleston, possesses all the advantages of a perfect hog farm, such as pure running water, sheltered location, shade, range, etc. Mr. Alexander was born in Madison, Jefferson Co., Ind., Aug. 5, 1842; when about 10 years old, he removed with his parents to Tipton Co., Ind.; at 14, he left home, and going to Louisiana, Mo., engaged as a clerk in a dry goods store. In 1861, he went to Tuscola, Douglas Co., Ill., and clerked one year; he then, with Mr. Robert Beech, built the Beech House, the...

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