Location: Lyons County KS

Biographical Sketch of Richard Ll. D. Cordley, Rev.

Rev. Richard Cordley, Ll. D., during a period of nearly forty years minister of the Plymouth Congregational Church at Lawrence, a victim of the Quantrill raid and somewhat known in public life, was born at Nottingham, England, September 6, 1829. When he was about four years of age he came with his parents to America, the family locating on a tract of Government land in Livingston County, Michigan, where Richard attended the pioneer public schools. In 1854 he graduated from the University of Michigan and in 1857 from the Andover Theological Seminary. On December 2, 1857, he preached his first sermon in the Plymonth Congregational Church at Lawrence, Kansas, where he remained as pastor until 1875, when he went to Flint, Michigan, for awhilc, after which he was pastor of a church at Emporia, Kansas, for six years. In 1884 he returned to Lawrence and continued as pastor of the Plymouth Church until his death, which ocenrred on July 11, 1904. At the time of the Quantrill raid, August 21, 1863, his house and all its contents were burned, and he was one of the persons marked for death, but he managed to elude the guerrillas. Mr. Cordley was several times a member of the National Council of Congregational Churches. In 1871 he was elected president of Washington College, but declined the office. Three years later the University of...

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Biography of Samuel N. Wood, Col.

Col. Samuel N. Wood, long a resident of Lawrence and a leader of the free-state party in Kansas, was prominent as one of the founders of the republican party, as a legislator in both houses, as an editor and one of the original stockholders of the Atchison. Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad. He was born at Mount Gilead. Ohio, December 30, 1825. the son of Quaker parents, from whom he imbibed his anti-slavery sentiments at an early age. In 1844, although too young to vote, he was chairman of the liberal party central committee of this county. Four years later be supported Martin Van Buren, the freesoil candidate for President, and he was conductor of one of the underground railways which passed near his house. He taught school, studied law and on June 6, 1854, two days after being admitted to the bar, he started for the Territory of Kansas. Early in July Mr. Wood located on a claim four miles west of Lawrence, and immediately became an acknowledged leader of the free-state party. He was one of the man who rescued Jacob Branson from Sheriff Jones, an act which brought on the Wakarusa war; was delegate to the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, convention which organized the republican party in 1856; to the Philadelphia convention of the same year, and to the Leavenworth constitutional convention in 1858. The following year he...

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Biographical Sketch of Lawrence D. Bailey, Judge

Judge Lawrence D. Bailey, long a resident of Emporia and the pioneer lawyer of Southwestern Kansas, also accomplished much in forwarding the agricultural interests of the state. He was a New Hampshire man, born at Sutton, Merrimack County, August 26, 1819. He was of an old Euglish manufacturing family, and his American ancestors are said to have built the first woolen factory in America at what is now Georgetown, Massachusetts. The judge was educated in Pennsylvania, read law and was admitted to the bar in July, 1846, and after practicing three years in New Hampshire started for California, by way of Cape Horn. After spending four years on the coast, engaged in lumbering, gold digging, practicing law and editorial work, he returned to New Hampshire in the fall of 1853. He then practiced law in his native state until he started for Kansas in the spring of 1857. On the second of April, of that year, Judge Bailey settled on a claim near Clinton, Douglas County, but in the following September opened a law office at Emporia. In 1858 he was elected to the Territorial Legislature; in the following year became associate justice of the Supreme Court of Kansas, under the Wyandotte constitution, and in 1862 was re-elected for six years, under statehood. In 1863 he assisted in organizing the State Board of Agriculture, serving as its president for...

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Biography of James S. Adam

James S. Adam has been a prominent factor in business affairs at Dunlap for the past fifteen years, and is regarded as the banker of the village. He was born in Kirkentelloch, Scotland, March 12, 1870, a son of William and Mary Adam. The father was born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1832, and brought his family to America in 1880, settling in White City, Kansas. From there he removed to Parkerville, in 1894, and lived there until his death, in 1896. He was a farmer and stockman. Ten years old when brought to this country, James S. Adam had his early training in the schools of Scotland, and then grew up on his father’s farm in Kansas until he was about eighteen. His first ambition was for railroad work, and becoming an operator he was stationed at various points along the line of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway, both in Oklahoma and Kansas. Since 1902 his home had been at Dunlap, where at first he was active as a merchant and is still largely interested in the leading general store. In 1905 he took the executive post of cashier in the Dunlap Farmers Bank and had since successfully managed the affairs of this institution. Mr. Adam is a democrat and is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America,...

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Biography of George L. Beard

George L. Beard is an Arkansas City business man of thirty years’ standing, and owned and directs the largest exclusive athletic and sporting goods house in the State of Kansas. Mr. Beard first came out to Kansas in the early ’70s, and there is no one who knows the history and the people of Southern Kansas better than this veteran merchant. Mr. Beard is a native of Illinois, born at Naperville, about thirty miles from Chicago, on August 8, 1846. His father, Charles Beard, was one of the early pioneers in that section of Illinois. The Beard ancestry goes back to colonial times in New York State. The family is of Scotch-Irish origin. Mr. Beard’s grandfather, Abel Beard, spent his life in New York State and his activities were those of farming. Charles Beard was born at Steubenville, New York, in 1800, grew up there, but when a young man went to Boston, Massachusetts, where he married. Not long afterward he moved west and acquired 370 acres of raw land at Naperville, Illinois. Part of it was his homestead, and he developed it as a high class farm, made his prosperity as an agriculturist, and finally retired to the nearby City of Aurora, where he died in 1874. Charles Beard became a republican on the organization of that party and was one of the active supporters of the People’s...

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Biography of Oliver D. Walker, M.D.

Oliver D. Walker, M. D. By reason of his active service as a member of the Kansas State Board of Health, of which he was president in 1912, and the honor conferred upon him in his election as president of the Kansas State Medical Society in 1915, Doctor Walker, of Salina, is one of the best known physicians and surgeons in Kansas. At the doctor’s home in Salina resided his venerable father, George M. Walker, whose long experience and active service identifies him with a number of pioneer things in the State of Kansas. George M. Walker was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, September 16, 1830, a son of David O. Walker, a native of the same state. When he was twenty-seven years of age, in 1857, he came out to the Territory of Kansas. He made his home in Lyons County, then a frontier community. He took charge and until the outbreak of the Civil war operated the first overland mail and package line between Lawrence and Emporia. He saw a long and active career as a soldier during the Civil war. Enlisting in the Eleventh Kansas Cavalry, commanded by Preston B. Plumb, who later rose to distinction as one of the great Kansans of his generation, he served as a private for a year and then was made first lieutenant. He was one of the capable and...

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