Location: Lowell Massachusetts

Ancestors of Horace Alden Keith of Brockton, MA

Horace Alden Keith, founder of the Brockton Webbing Company, one of the successful and thriving industries of Brockton, and one of that city’s enterprising and progressive business men, is a descendant on both his paternal and maternal sides of historic old New England ancestry. Mr. Keith was born in West Bridgewater May 25, 1862, eldest son of the late Henry Snell and Thalia (Alden) Keith. The ancestral line of the branch of the Keith family in this country to which Horace Alden Keith belongs, and which follows, is given in chronological order from the first American ancestor. Rev. James Keith, born in 1644, was educated in Aberdeen, Scotland (as tradition says at the expense of a maiden aunt), where he was graduated likely from Marischal College, his name appearing on the roll of 1657, said college having been founded by George, the fifth Earl of Keith Marischal, in 1593. At the age of eighteen years he emigrated to this country, arriving at Boston in 1662. He was introduced to the church at Bridgewater by Dr. Increase Mather, and became settled as the minister of the Bridgewater Church Feb. 18, 1664. Rev. James Keith passed away in West Bridgewater July 23, 1719, aged seventy-six years, having labored in the ministry of the town for fifty-six years.

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Lowell Massachusetts Genealogy

Tracing ancestors in Lowell, Massachusetts online and for free has been greatly enhanced by the University of Massachusetts in Lowell which provided digitized version of a large quantity of the Lowell public records. Combined with the cemetery and census records available freely online, you should be able to easily trace your ancestors from the founding of Lowell in 1826 through 1940, the last year of available census records. To add color to the otherwise basic facts of your ancestors existence we provide free access to a wide range of manuscripts on the history of Lowell, it’s manufactures and residents.

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Lowell Massachusetts Newspaper Archives 1837-1893

The following digitized newspapers are provided by University of Massachusetts at Lowell. They cover various newspapers published in Lowell Massachusetts during the years of 1837-1893 and under the banners of “The Lowell Courier”, “The Lowell Daily Courier”, “Lowell Daily Journal and Courier”, and the “Lowell Advertiser.” Lacking issues, mutilated and missing pages. At this time of initial microfilming, some of these files are incomplete or imperfect as indicated on the reel. If any of the material is added at a later date it will be found in its proper place, or at the end of the reel concerned, or...

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Contributions of the Lowell Massachusetts Historical Society

The Lowell Historical Society of Lowell Massachusetts published 2 volumes of “contributions” to the recording of the history of Lowell Massachusetts at the turn of the century. These contributions were preceded by the contributions by the Old Residents Historical Association of Lowell, Massachusetts. Table of Contents Volume I Bunker Hill, The Battle of, and Those Who Participated Therein from the Towns from which Lowell was Formed, Mrs. Sara Swan Griffin Fiske, Rev. John, by Henry S. Perham Francis, Mrs. Sarah W., by Miss Mabel Hill Lincoln, Abraham, Centennial Anniversary of Introductory Address, Solon W. Stevens Recollections of Lincoln in...

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Yearbooks of the Rogers Hall School, Lowell MA 1900-1973

The University of Massachusetts at Lowell digitized 35 bound volumes of the Rogers Hall School monthly paper during the years of 1900-1973. The paper during this period was known as “The Spindle”. Each volume contains several years of the Rogers Hall school papers. School papers often provide a window into student life. From sports teams to clubs, fashions to hairstyles, these volumes document the changing attitudes and culture of high school students year by year.

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Yearbooks for the State Teachers College at Lowell, MA 1934-1974

The University of Massachusetts at Lowell digitized all 38 of the yearbooks provided by the senior class during the years of 1936-1974 and known as “The Knoll”. They also digitized 1 earlier yearbook when it was known as “The Marm”. Yearbooks provide a window into student life. From sports teams to clubs, fashions to hairstyles, these volumes document the changing attitudes and culture of college students year by year.

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Lowell Massachusetts Annual Reports 1862-1928

Most towns in New England started publishing annual reports of the town’s public business in the 1800’s and many smaller towns still carry on that trait today. The following list of 52 free annual reports for Lowell Massachusetts covers the years of 1862-1928 (incomplete). Each town provided different reports in it’s annual publications, but they generally contain information on vital records (births, marriages and deaths) for the year of publication (not always included in early years), lists of public officials, lists of police officers, firemen, and other government workers, including school teachers. Don’t overlook the town’s expenditures list, as it often included payments made to town citizens for work they performed in the town’s behest. Also, many towns include payments made for the support of the indigent within the town.

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Biography of John W. Severance

John W. Severance, a prominent resident of Chichester, Merrimack County, and an ex-member of the New Hampshire legislature, was born February 3, 1822, in Sandwich, Carroll County, which was also the birthplace of his parents, Asa and Rhoda (Webster) Severance. His greatgrandfather, Ephraim Severance, was one of the pioneer farmers of that town, having gone there from Deerfield, N.H. John Severance, son of Ephraim and grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a lifelong resident of Sandwich. He was an able farmer and possessed considerable mechanical ingenuity, which he applied to various kinds of handicraft. He took a leading part in public affairs as a supporter of the Whig party, and served as Tax Collector for sixteen consecutive years. He married Lydia Jewell, and had twelve children. The only survivor of the family is James M., who resides in Boston. His wife, Adeline Randall, died leaving four children-Eliza, Nancy, Alonzo, and Waldo. John Severance died at the age of seventy-three, but his wife lived to be eighty years old. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Asa Severance, son of John and father of John W. Severance, was reared to agricultural pursuits; and when a young man he bought a farm adjoining the parental homestead. He displayed an ability which foreshadowed a successful future; but his prosperous career was cut short by his death, which occurred at...

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Biography of Charles Eastman Staniels

Charles Eastman Staniels, a prominent life insurance agent of Concord, N.H., was born in Lowell, Mass., December 27, 1844, son of Edward L. and Ruth Bradley (Eastman) Staniels. The father, born in Chichester, N.H., for many years was interested in the drug business, successively in Lowell and Boston, Mass. Toward the latter part of his life he removed to Roxbury, Mass., then a suburb of Boston, and died there at the age of sixty-five years. He was twice married. By his first wife there were three children, all of whom are now dead. His second marriage was made with Ruth Bradley Eastman, now over eighty-five years old, whose only child is the subject of this sketch. A daughter of General Isaac Eastman, of Concord, N.H., she is a direct descendant, in the sixth generation, of Captain Ebenezer Eastman, the first settler of Concord, and of Captain Edward Johnson, the historian of Woburn, Mass., one of the commissioners appointed by the General Court of Massachusetts Bay Colony to fix the northern boundary of that colony in 1652. In 1833 a large boulder was discovered at the entrance of Lake Winnepesaukee at Weirs, N.H., bearing the initials of Governor John Endicott, with those of the commissioners, Captain Edward Johnson and Captain Symon Willard, which had remained unnoticed and subject to elemental conditions for one hundred and eighty-one years. The State of...

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