Location: Louisville Kentucky

Biographical Sketch of Gen. John A. Halderman

Gen. John A. Halderman, a Leavenworth lawyer and a Kentnckian by birth, made an honorable reputation in the public and military affairs of Kansas, as well as in the diplomatic service of the Far East. In the spring of 1854, at the age of twenty-one, and soon after his graduation from the University of Louisville, he came to Kansas and began the practice of law at Leavenworth. He served as private secretary to Andrew H. Reeder, the first territorial governor, and in 1855 was secretary of the first Territorial Council. He was appointed the first probate judge of Leavenworth County; was major of the First Kansas Regiment in the Civil war, and majorgeneral of the state militia. As to his public honors at home. General Halderman served two terms as mayor of Leavenworth; was a regent of the university; a member of the State House of Representatives; and in 1870 was sent to the State Senate. In 1872-73 he traveled abroad. In 1880 he was appointed consul at Bangkok and was soon promoted to the consul-generalship by President Garfield. In 1883 he was the first United States minister to Siam, where the king honored him with the decoration of Knight Commander of the Order of the White Elephant, and later the French government gazetted him Commander of the Royal Order of Cambodia. He resigned his position in 1885 and...

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Slave Narrative of Susan Dale Sanders

Interviewer: Byer York Person Interviewed: Susan Dale Sanders Location: Louisville, Kentucky Place of Birth: Spencer County KY Place of Residence: #1 Dupree Alley, Louisville, Kentucky The following is a story of Mrs. Susan Dale Sanders, #1 Dupree Alley, between Breckinridge and Lampton Sts., Louisville, an old Negro Slave mammy, and of her life, as she related it. “I lived near Taylorsville, Kentucky, in Spencer County, nearly all my life, ‘cept the last fo’ or five yea’s I’se been livin’ here. I was bo’n there in a log cabin, it was made of logs, and it was chinked with clay and rock. My Mammy, was raised from a baby by her master, Rueben Dale. He was a good ole Master, and was alway’s good to my Mammy. Master Dale owned a big farm and had big fields of co’n an’ tobacco, and we raised everything we had to eat. Ole master Dale was a good ole baptist, had lots of good ole time relig’n. Ruben Dale had lots of slaves, and every family had its own cabin. As he raised my Mammy as a slave from a baby, she thought there was none livin’ bett’r than her master Dale. The next fa’m close to the Masters, was owned by a man, Colonel Jack Allen, and he had a big fa’m and owned lots of slaves. And Mammy was allowed to...

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Slave Narrative of Joana Owens

Interviewer: Byers York Person Interviewed: Joana Owens Location: Louisville, Kentucky Place of Residence: 520 E. Breckinridge St., Louisville, Kentucky The following is the life and traditions of Joana Owens, 520 E. Breckinridge St., Louisville, Kentucky, an old negro mammy who was born during slavery. “My mother and father was slaves, and there was two children born to them, my sister and me. We used to live at Hawesville, Kentucky, on the Ohio River. My peoples name was Barr, and their masters name was Nolan Barr. You know they all had to take their masters name in slave days. I will never forget how mean old Master Nolan Barr was to us. I was about fourteen years old and my sister was a little younger. We lived in an old log cabin. The cracks was filled with mud. My Mother done the housework for Master Barr’s house. My father and sister and me had to work in the fields. He had a big farm, and owned lots of slaves, and when the old master got mad at his slaves for not working hard enough he would tie them up by their thumbs and whip the male slaves till they begged for mercy. He sure was a mean old man. I will never forget him as long as I live. I don’t know exactly how old I is, but I am...

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Slave Narrative of Martha J. Jones

Interviewer: Byers York Person Interviewed: Martha J. Jones Location: Louisville, Kentucky Place of Birth: Buckingham County, Virginia Date of Birth: 1847 Age: 90 In an interview with Mrs. Martha J. Jones, she reminisced of the old Civil War days as follows: “I was born in Buckingham County, Virginia, and later during the Civil War, I lived in Gilmer County, W. Va. My fathers name was Robert R. Turner; he was born in 1818 and my mother’s name was Susan; she was born in 1821. My parents had six children and we lived on a big farm. My father was in the legislature in W. Va. During the Civil War, I had three brother in the Southern Army. One of them died of fever, one was shot and killed in action, and the other William Wert Turner, came out of the army after the close of the war and became a lawyer. Later he went to New Castle, Kentucky, and became a prominent lawyer, where he remained until his death in 1932. I married John R. Jones, a lieutenant in the Union Army, at Gilmer, W. Va., when I was about twenty years old, shortly after the war. We then moved to New Castle, Kentucky, Henry County. We had four children born to us, and I now have three living children; later on in years we moved to Louisville. During...

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Slave Narrative of Celia Henderson

Interviewer: Miriam Logan Person Interviewed: Celia Henderson Location: Ohio Place of Birth: Hardin County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1849 Age: 88 Miriam Logan Lebanon, Ohio MRS. CELIA HENDERSON, aged 88 Born Hardin County, Kentucky in 1849 (drawing of Celia Henderson) [TR: no drawing found] “Mah mammy were Julia Dittoe, an pappy, he were name Willis Dittoe. Dey live at Louieville till mammy were sold fo’ her marster’s debt. She were a powerful good cook, mammy were-an she were sol’ fo to pay dat debt.” “She tuk us four chillen ‘long wid her, an pappy an th’ others staid back in Louieville. Dey tuk us all on a boat de Big Ribber-evah heah ob de big ribber? Mississippi its name-but we calls it de big ribber.” “Natchez on de hill-dats whaah de tuk us to. Nactchez-on-de-hill dis side of N’ Or’leans. Mammy she have eleven chillen. No ’em, don’t ‘member all dem names no mo’. No ’em, nevah see pappy no moah. Im ‘member mammy cryin’ goin’ down on de boat, and us chillen a cryin’ too, but de place we got us was a nice place, nicer den what we left. Family ‘o name of GROHAGEN it was dat got us. Yas’em dey was nice to mammy fo’ she was a fine cook, mammy wus. A fine cook!” “Me? Go’Long! I ain’t no sech cook as my mammy was....

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Slave Narrative of Julia King

Interviewer: K. Osthimer Person Interviewed: Julia King Date of Interview: June 10, 1937 Location: Toledo, Ohio Place of Residence: 731 Oakwood Avenue, Toledo, Ohio Age: (about) 80 K. Osthimer, Author Folklore: Stories From Ex-Slaves Lucas County, Dist. 9 Toledo, Ohio The Story of MRS. JULIA KING of Toledo, Ohio. Mrs. Julia King resides at 731 Oakwood Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. Although the records of the family births were destroyed by a fire years ago, Mrs. King places her age at about eighty years. Her husband, Albert King, who died two years ago, was the first Negro policeman employed on the Toledo police force. Mrs. King, whose hair is whitening with age, is a kind and motherly woman, small in stature, pleasing and quiet in conversation. She lives with her adopted daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth King Kimbrew, who works as an elevator operator at the Lasalle & Koch Co. Mrs. King walks with a limp and moves about with some difficulty. She was the first colored juvenile officer in Toledo, and worked for twenty years under Judges O’Donnell and Austin, the first three years as a volunteer without pay. Before her marriage, Mrs. King was Julia Ward. She was born in Louisville, Kentucky. Her parents Samuel and Matilda Ward, were slaves. She had one sister, Mary Ward, a year and a half older than herself. She related her story in her own...

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Biography of A. Banks Wilburn, M. D.

Dr. A. Banks Wilburn, engaged in the practice of surgery in St. Louis, was born in Audrain county, Missouri, February 19, 1874, a son of St. Clair and Susan (Coyle) Wilburn. The father was successfully engaged in farming and stock raising for many years in Audrain county but has now passed away. The family numbered fourteen children, nine sons and four daughters, of whom thirteen reached maturity. Dr. Wilburn was educated to the age of fourteen years in the district schools of his native county and spent that period of his life upon the home farm. The family then removed to Martinsburg and Dr. Wilburn entered the high school at Mexico, Missouri, which he attended until 1891, when he became a student in the Missouri Military Academy at Mexico, there pursuing his studies through three years. He afterward came to St. Louis and here entered the St. Louis Dental College, in which he was a student during the year 1894. In 1895 he matriculated in the dental and medical department of the Hospital College of Medicine at Louisville, Kentucky, and was graduated therefrom in July, 1896. Following his graduation he removed to Franklin county, Texas, where he engaged in the general practice of dentistry until 1897. Returning to St. Louis he became a student in the Barnes Medical College and won his M. D. degree in 1900. Through the...

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Biography of Walter A. Johnson

Walter A. Johnson, president of the Missouri Life & Accident Insurance Company, with offices in the Metropolitan building, was born on a farm near Murfreesboro, Tennessee, November 23, 1869. His father, B. P. Johnson, is a native of Tennessee and is now a farmer near Waco, Texas. An uncle, Willis Johnson, was killed while serving with the Confederate forces in the Civil war. The mother of Walter A. Johnson bore the maiden name of Ella Norman and was born in Tennessee. The family has been represented in America through several generations. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Johnson was celebrated near Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and to them were born five children, three sons and two daughters: Walter A.; E. N., who married Fannie Williams; R. E., who wedded Mary Emma Magill and is living in Waco, Texas; Kate, the wife of Charles Childs, a resident of Mart, Texas; and Mary, the wife of Alfred Looney, residing in Axtill, Texas. Walter A. Johnson was educated in the country schools near Murfreesboro, Tennessee, his training being equivalent to a high school education. In 1895 he turned his attention to the insurance business as a solicitor for the National Life & Accident Insurance Company of Nashville, Tennessee, and was there until 1902, during which time he rose to the position of superintendent. In the year indicated he went to Louisville, Kentucky, for the...

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Biographical Sketch of J.H. Tripp, M.D.

J. H. Tripp, M. D., of Marble Hill, was born March 18, 1843, in Lincoln County, Tennessee, and is one of a family of seven children born to Henry and Nancy (Gattis) Tripp, both natives of North Carolina. They were married in Lincoln County, Tennessee, and the father followed agricultural pursuits until his death in 1846 or 1847. The mother is still living in Lincoln County. Our subject remained and assisted his mother on the farm until the breaking out of the late war, when he enlisted in the Forty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, and remained with this until the surrender at Appomattox Court House. He then returned home and engaged in farming for several years, and also secured a limited education by attending common schools for about fifteen months. He attended the Washington Medical College at Baltimore, Maryland, session of 1870-71, and then practiced at Marble Hill till 1876, after which he attended Medical College at Louisville, Kentucky. Here he graduated and resumed his practice at Marble Hill till the session of I884-85 of the medical department of the University of Tennessee, at which place he also graduated, and has since continued the practice of his profession at his home in this county. August 22, 1876, he married Sally A. Bean, to which union one child was born, Myrtle. The Doctor and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal...

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Biography of Alvin Avant

Alvin Avant, Attorney at Law, of Smithville, was born in Dekalb County in 1856, a son of William C. and Nancy (Williams) Avant. The father is of French descent, Born in 1822 in Dekalb County. His father, Benjamin Avant, was a native of Virginia, who immigrated to Dekalb County at an early date. William C. married and settled in the Twelfth District of his native county, where he is a prosperous and respected farmer and possessor of 300 acres of valuable land. His wife was also born in Dekalb County, of English descent. She is now sixty-two years of age. Of their eleven children, Alvin is the fifth. His early education was received at Fulton Academy in Smithville. At the age of eighteen he commenced the study of medicine under the care of Dr. J. S. Harrison. In 1873 he entered the medical department of the university at Louisville, Ky., graduating in March of the next year as M. D. For one year he practiced in Smithville, at the expiration of which time he abandoned medicine and took up the study of law. His preceptor was M. D. Smallman, now judge of the Sixth Circuit of Tennessee. Mr. Avant was admitted to the bar in 1879. The same year he was elected county attorney, serving two years. January 1881, he became superintendent of public instruction, holding the office four...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles Smith

This worthy pioneer and substantial citizen of Malheur County, is deserving of a place in any compilation that purports to give the history of this section, since his labors have been here for many years toward the development and progress of the country, and since he is a man of ability and has achieved a goodly success as the reward of his labors and thrift. Mr. Smith was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on October 18, 1835, being the son of John and Susan Smith. At the age of eight he went with his parents to Illinois and there remained until 1854, when he came across the plains with his brothers, in an ox train, to Siskiyou County, California, and there engaged in mining. He made some good discoveries and later, 1858, went to the Cariboo mines at the time of the Fraser river excitement, whence he returned to Portland, then to Salem, and there followed his trade of brick mason. In 1878 he removed to Jackson County and remained three years and then vent to Mugginsville, California, where he mined until 188o. The next year he came to Malheur County, and located the place where he now lives as a homestead, ten miles northwest from Rockville, and devoted himself to farming and stock raising. His place is under the irrigating ditch and well improved and he has a good...

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Biography of August A. Jekel

August A. Jekel, secretary and treasurer of the Reliable Life & Accident Insurance Company of St. Louis, was born in Germany, April 22, 1867, his parents being Henry and Katherine (Maeser) Jekel, both of whom were natives of Germany, where they were reared and married, the father there following the occupation of farming. Their family numbered five children, two sons and three daughters, of whom all are living, namely: Katherine, the wife of George H. Velten of Germany; Mrs. Bertha Hechler, a widow, living in Germany; August A., who is the third in order of birth; Eliza, the wife of Adolph Lind of Germany; and Carl, who is married and makes his home in Germany. August A. Jekel was educated in his native country, his training being equivalent to that of a high school education in America. He afterward worked at the butcher’s trade in Germany to the age of twenty-six years, and then resolved to try his fortune in America. Accordingly he crossed the Atlantic and on the 12th of November, 1894, arrived on the shores of the new world. He made his way first to Louisville, Kentucky, where he was employed as a butcher until May 20, 1900. He then became agent for the Prudential Insurance Company of Louisville, Kentucky, and proving his capability and efficiency in that position was promoted to assistant superintendent on the 9th...

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Biography of George R. Wendling, Jr.

George R. Wendling, Jr., of the Myers-Wendling Insurance Company of St. Louis, was born March 9, 1894, in Bloomington, Illinois. His father, George R. Wendling, was also a native of Illinois, his birth having occurred in Shelby county. He became a prominent attorney of that state and was a member of a constitutional convention of 1870 which framed the organic law of the commonwealth and had the distinction of being the youngest representative in that body, as he was only twenty-five years of age when elected. He won wide popularity as a lecturer as well as distinction in law practice. For several years he was associated in his professional activity with Judge Anthony Thornton, at one time chief justice of the state of Illinois. In politics Mr. Wendling was a lifelong democrat and exerted considerable influence over political affairs in state and nation, yet never sought nor desired public office. In early manhood he married Josephine Stephenson, a daughter of James Stephenson, who was born in Virginia. In tha family of Mr. and Mrs. George R. Wendling, Sr., were two daughters: Mrs. O. W. Catching, of Vicksburg, Mississippi, her husband being a prominent attorney there, and Mrs. William S. Conant, whose husband is a consulting engineer of Detroit, Michigan. The son of the family, George R. Wendling, Jr., was educated in the public schools of Washington, D. C., and...

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Biography of Henry Craig Morrison

Henry Craig Morrison, secretary, treasurer and general manager of the Morrison Lee Mining & Development Company, president of the Contract Waterproofing Company and also secretary of the Arkansas Mining & Mercantile Company, has won a most creditable position in business circles in St. Louis, his native city. He was born July 22, 1888, and is a son of John W. Morrison of St. Louis, whose birth occurred in Georgetown, Kentucky, and who comes of an old family of English lineage. The first representatives of the name landed at Plymouth during the early colonization of Massachusetts, and for a century the. family was represented in Kentucky before John W. Morrison became a resident of St. Louis. Here he entered prominently into the business life of the city as a member of the dry goods firm of Hargardine McKittrick & Company. He wedded Mary Elizabeth Sparks, who was born in Fort Smith, Arkansas, and is a daughter of Mitchell Sparks, who belonged to one of the old families of Arkansas that settled at Fort Smith prior to the Civil war. Mrs. Morrison is still a resident of St. Louis. In the schools of his native city Henry Craig Morrison pursued his education until he had completed a course in the Central high school and later he attended the Rolla School of Mines, from which he was graduated in 1913 with the...

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Biography of Maj. John P. Clendenin

MAJ. JOHN P. CLENDENIN. This gentleman, the register of public lands at Harrison, Arkansas, is capable, efficient and trustworthy, and in the discharge of his official duties has shown that he is the ” right man in the right place.” The Major was born in Louisville, Kentucky, September 4, 1839, a son of James M. and Eliza (Peay) Clendenin, the former of whom was born in Harford County Md., in 1796, and was a son of John Clendenin who was also born in that State and who was a soldier of the Revolutionary War. The name is of Scotch origin, and the family has for many generations resided in this country. James M. Clendenin was a soldier of the War of 1812 and with Jackson in the famous battle of New Orleans. He became a resident of Kentucky when a young man, was married in Louisville, and in 1846 removed to St. Louis, Missouri, where he became a very prominent man and president of the first Board of Underwriters in that city. He was president of the United States Insurance Company from its inception up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1859. He and his wife reared a family of six children: Mrs. Courtenay, of Allegheny City, Pa.; William A., who is connected with the Boatmen’s Bank of St. Louis, and John P. Mr. Clendenin held...

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