Select Page

Location: Loudoun County VA

Genealogy of Johann Peter Stoneburner

Johann Peter, second son of Jacob and Anna Stoneburner, married Susanna Compher? sometime around 1782/85 in Loudoun County, Virginia. They were still living in Virginia in 1810 but near 1813 they had moved to Ohio. In 1820 Peter became one of the first officers of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. Later Peter and Susanna became members of the New Jerusalem Church of Deavertown, Ohio which was in the northwest part of Morgan County. His will was made in Morgan County, Ohio on the 29th day of September 1821. It read: “In the Name of God, Amen: I, Peter Stoneburner of York Township, Morgan County and State of Ohio, farmer; being strong in mind and memory, make this my last will and testament. 1st. I bequeath my soul to God who gave it to me, and my body to the earth to be buried decently in a Christian manner. I bequeath this plantation whereon I live, and the house to my wife Susanna Stoneburner as long as she lives, I also bequeath to her all the household furniture that is in the house, I also bequeath to her one horse and one cow. I bequeath to John Wiley one hundred and sixty acres of land, to be purchased for him out of this estate where on I now live. I appoint my sons Michael Stoneburner and John Stoneburner as my executors....

Read More

Genealogy of Jacob Stoneburner

On 23 September 1752 Jacob and Martin Stoneburner, possibly brothers, came to America on board the ship St. Andrew from Rotterdam to Philadelphia. Both of them were over the age of 16. Jacob early moved to Berks County, Pennsylvania where in 1767 he owned thirty acres, had one horse, one cow, two sheep. It was probably there that he married Anna Eva sometime before August 1758. Johann Adam Eva had come from Rotterdam to Philadelphia, 20 October 1754 on the ship Halifax. This Eva was possibly related to the Anna who married Jacob Stoneburner. There in Berks County, Jacob and Anna became members of the St. Joseph’s Union Church at Oley Hill which is east of present day Reading, Pennsylvania. By 1782 Jacob and his two older sons were residents of Loudoun County, Virginia, according to an early tax list. In Virginia Jacob and Anna became members of the New Jerusalem Lutheran Church at Lovettsville. However, the Shelburne Parish in Loudoun County, Virginia showed Jacob Stoneburner on the tax table list of 1771. Both Jacob and Anna are buried in the New Jerusalem Lutheran Church Cemetery. 101 Jacob Stoneburner, born 8 March 1729 Germany married before 1758 Anna Eva, Berks County, Pa. born circa 1731 died 10 Jan. 1796 Loudoun Co., Va. died 24 May 1796 Loudoun Co., Va. Children of Jacob Stoneburner and Anna Eva: 201 Johann Peter Stoneburner born...

Read More

Biography of William A. Harris, Gen.

Gen. William A. Harris was a brave officer of the Confederacy, a pioneer railroad engineer, a successful and leading stock raiser of improved breeds and, both in state and national bodies (including the Congress of the United States), an untiring and effective promoter of agricultural interests. Born in Loudoun County, Virginia, October 29, 1841, as a boy he was educated in his native state and at Buenos Aires, Argentina, whither his father had been sent as United States minister. In June, 1859, he graduated from Columbia College, Washington, District of Columbia. Immediately afterward he went to Central America and spent six months on a ship canal survey, but returned home and entered the Virginia Military Institute in January, 1860. He was in the graduating class of 1861, but in April of that year he and his classmates entered the Confederate service. He served three years as assistant adjutant-general of Wilcox’s brigade and as ordnance officer of Gens. D. H. Hill’s and Rhodes’ divisions of the Army of Northern Virginia. In 1865 he came to Kansas and entered the employ of the Union Pacific railroad as civil engineer. The road was then completed to Lawrence, and his first work was to build the Leavenworth branch, which he completed in 1866. Mr. Harris was resident engineer of the road until it was completed to Carson in the fall of 1868, when...

Read More

Biography of John M. Silcott

Almost forty years have passed since John M. Silcott took up his residence in Idaho, and he is therefore one of the oldest and most widely known pioneers of the state. He came in the spring of 1860 to establish the government Indian agency at Lapwai, and has since been identified with the growth and development of this section. He is a Virginian, his birth having occurred in Loudoun County, of the Old Dominion, January 14, 1824. His French and Scotch ancestors were early settlers there, and during the Revolution and the war of 18 12 representatives of the family loyally served their country on the field of battle. William Silcott, the father of our subject, married Sarah Violet, a lady of Scotch ancestry, and about 1828 they removed with the family to Zanesville, Ohio, where the father engaged in business as a contractor and builder. He was liberal in his religious views, and his wife held the faith of the Presbyterian Church. His political support was given the Whig party and the principles advocated by Henry Clay. Only two children of the family of five are now living, the sister being Sarah T., who married Captain Abrams, of Brownsville, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Abrams now makes her home in Baltimore, Maryland. In 1845 the family removed to St. Louis, where both the parents died. Mr. Silcott received a common-school education...

Read More

Biography of George H. Grimmell, M. D.

George H. Grimmell, M. D. One of the first graduates of medicine to set up in practice at Howard, Kansas, was Dr. George H. Grimmell, who rendered his first professional services in that section of Elk County thirty years ago. With the exception of about eight years spent at Onaga, Doctor Grimmell had been continuously in practice at Howard since 1898, and is accounted one of the most competent surgeons in that locality. The first authentic records of his ancestry is found in the annals of the first crusade of 1096, A. D. There was a Sir John Von Grimmell, who was one of the enthusiastic Germans who joined as followers of the Cross in the endeavor to wrest Jerusalem from the hands of the Moslems. The line of descent from this crusader is traced directly to Dr. George H. Grimmell of Kansas. There is also a coat of arms in the family, and it is a reproduction of Baron Grimmell’s insignia as found in the year 1555. The coat consists of shield, quarterings, mantling, helmet, coronet and crest. Those versed in the science of heraldry can find in this coat of arms significant traces of the original Von Grimmell’s services as a crusader. Doctor Grimmell gets his profession naturally, since for several generations the Grimmell family have produced capable medical practitioners. He is a grandson of Henry Charles...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of William Beavers

William Beavers, farmer; P. O. Hutton; is one of the pioneers of this county, and was born in Loudoun Co., Va., on 23d day of July, 1797; at the age of 17, he left home, driving a team to Barren Co., Ky., remaining there for four or five years. In the year 1818, he married Miss Nancy Bradenburg (daughter of Henry Bradenburg), and after remaining at the home of her parents one year, rented a farm for one year, and, in 1820, went to Clay Co., Ind., remaining there for seven years; in 1827, he came to Clark Co., Ill., near Westfield, and lived there for three years, and, in the year 1830, entered and moved upon the land upon which he now resides, on Sec. 10, near the village of Salisbury; he owns eighty acres. Mr. Beavers first built a log cabin, with a “puncheon floor.” The Kickapoo Indians at that time owned this land and lived all around him; while cutting some ” bee-trees ” in Long Point, this county, he saw the ” runners ” that had been sent by Black Hawk calling the Indians together. Mr. Beavers is remarkably active at his time of life, now being in his 82d year; his mother died in Virginia while he was an infant, and his father in Locust Grove, Adams Co., Ohio, where he had moved some...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Benjamin McMorris

Benjamin McMorris, farmer; P. O. Hutton; was born in Loudoun Co., Va., March 25, 1813; his parents moved to Frederick Co., Va., when he was a year old; his father died in the year 1818, and Mr. McMorris lived with his mother until he was 21 years of age, when they moved to Coshocton Co., Ohio; six years after, his mother returned to Virginia and died there in the year 1852. In the spring of 1836, Mr. McMorris married Rachel McLaughlin, and, three years afterward, moved to Coles Co., and settled in Sec. 9, Hutton Township, where he at present resides. His wife died Dec. 17, 1851, leaving six children, all living – Nancy (born Aug. 14, 1837), Margaret (July 7, 1839), Benjamin F. (May 16, 1842), Mary J. Nov. 11. 1847), William H. (Aug. 18, 1849), and Rachel (Dec. 5, 1851). He married his second wife, Miss Sarah J. Johns, daughter of James and Jane Johns, in February, 1852; she was born in Virginia, Pendleton Co., Aug. 11, 1825, and was the widow of Wm. Cartright; they had eight children, six living – Elizabeth J. (born Nov. 26, 1854-now Mrs. David T. French, at present residing in Kansas; married Nov. 14, 1870), John V. (born Oct. 15, 1856), Martha A. know Mrs. John Thornton born July 10, 1860 married Oct. 16, 1878), Russell J. (born Sept. 29, 1862),...

Read More

Biography of J. F. Drish

J. F. Drish, dealer in general hardware and agricultural implements, Mattoon; was born in Leesburg, Loudoun Co., Va., May 8, 1833; his father came west to Illinois in 1836 or 1837, and first settled in Whitehall, Greene Co., where he engaged in the practice of his profession-that of a physician and surgeon; at the age of 19, the subject of this sketch left home and crossed the plains to California; here he engaged in speculating and contracting; in 1854, he returned by way of the Isthmus of Panama and New York City; he next settled in Carlinville, and engaged in the dry goods and grocery trade till 1861. At the breaking of the civil war, he entered in the U. S. service in the 32d V. I., as Adjutant of the regiment; in April, 1862, he came home and assisted in raising and organizing the 122d I. V. I., and again entered the service as Lieutenant Colonel of the regiment; he was mustered out of the service in 1865, having been actively engaged with the regiment during its entire term of service. In 1865, he settled in Mattoon and engaged in his present occupation. He was married, in 1856, to Rosella C. Keller, a native of Illinois; they have two daughters-L. M. and Frankie, He has held the office of Supervisor two terms, and was Chairman of the Board...

Read More

Virginia Wills Before 1799

A complete abstract register of all names mentioned in over six hundred recorded wills, arranged alphabetically from Adams to Wright. Copied from the Court House Records of Amherst, Bedford, Campbell, Loudoun, Prince William and Rockbridge Counties of Virginia.

Read More

Biography of Jeremiah Titus

Jeremiah Titus, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Oakland; born in Loudoun Co., Va., Sept. 13, 1810, where he remained with his father, Tunis Titus, and engaged in farming until he attained his majority, and, for the first few years, worked at $5 per month, after which he hired by the year for $100 per year, which was the highest wages he received until 30 years of age, at which time he rented land and engaged in farming until 1855, when he removed to Muskingum Co., Ohio, and rented land until 1860, when he came to Coles Co., Ill., by team in company with Thomas Roberts, and located upon his present place, where he has since continued to live. He owns 106 acres upon his home farm, which he has made by his own hard labor energy and industry, in which he has been nobly assisted by his wife; Mr. Titus is now in his 60th year and, although exposed to all the hardships and privations of frontier life, is now in possession of all his faculties, and continues in good health; in 1872, he suffered the amputation of his right arm, since which time he has not been able to attend to all the duties of his farm; is yet able to saw the wood and attend to most of the light labor. He married, Oct. 2, 1837, to...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Thomas Roberts

Thomas Roberts, farmer; P. O. Oakland; was born in Loudoun Co., Va., Oct. 12, 1802, where he lived and engaged in farming until 1830, when he emigrated to Muskingum Co., Ohio, and engaged in farming until 1860, at which date he removed to Illinois and located upon his present place in East Oakland Tp., Coles Co., where he has since lived and followed farming. He married Feb. 7, 1828, to Alice Mock; she was born in Virginia Nov. 8, 1808; they have nine children now living, having lost three by death; the names of the living are Mary E. (now Mrs. George Geyer), Matilda (now Mrs. Peter Gobert), William H., Caroline (now Mrs. James W.. Titus), Castaria (now Mrs. Frank Taylor), Isaac N., Jane (now Mrs. F. M. Parker), John D. and Sherman W.; the names of the deceased are Jacob, and two which died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Roberts have taken a deep interest in the cause of religion, having been active members of the M. E. Church since 1833, for a period of forty-six years. Their married life extends over a period of half a...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Tillman Bagley

Tillman Bagley, horticulturist; Charleston; was born in Loudoun Co., Va., June 6, 1828; being left fatherless when but a child, he accompanied his mother, at the age of 9 years to Muskingum Co., Ohio, where they settled on a farm about twelve miles north of Zanesville; at 19, he left the farm to learn the trade of a marble-cutter, after completing which he worked as a journeyman until 1853; he then came to Charleston, and after working two years, started in the marble business for himself, in which he continued till 1869; at which time he purchased what is known as the True farm, in La Fayette Tp., and followed farming four years. Having a natural taste for horticultural pursuits he sold his farm and, returning to Charleston, purchased sixteen acres of returning lying within the corporation, which he began to improve; he built his residence and set his land to peaches, apples, raspberries, blackberries and strawberries; his aim was to secure the very earliest as well as the very latest varieties of fruit which it was possible to obtain, thus commanding the highest prices for his products. Mr. Bagley was married March 26, 1856, to Miss Ann Craig, a daughter of Elijah Craig, an early settler of Coles Co.; she was born in Boone Co., Ky., April 21, 1829, and came to Coles Co. in 1836; they have...

Read More

Search


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest