Location: London Kentucky

Biography of Charles G. Blakely

Charles G. Blakely, whose attainments as a business man have made his name familiar not only in his home City of Topeka but in many parts of the state, has been a resident of Kansas since the fall of 1883, and his first experience here was as teacher in Brown County. His is the interesting story of a boy born and reared in the mountainens district of Eastern Kentucky, where people lived on the plane of the simplest existence but not always of the highest ideals. There, in his early youth, came a stimulus to his ambition and hope which raised him out of his circumstances, and by self-help he struggled upward on the road of aspiration and finally made himself a place among the world’s influential workers. In the early days of Kentucky about the time Daniel Boone made history from the “dark and bloody ground,” members of the Blakely and Brown families from North Carolina and Virginia respectively settled within the borders of that commonwealth, and aided in reclaiming it from the domain of the wilderness, fought wild beasts and wild Indians, and for several generations lived peacefully and contentedly in the mountainous districts of the state. Many years later John Chestnut Blakely, a native of the mountains of Laurel County and Sarah Brown of the Bluegrass region, met and married, and they were the parents of...

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Slave Narrative of Jenny McKee

Interviewer: Perry Larkey Person Interviewed: Jenny McKee Location: London, Kentucky Age: (about) 85 Mrs. Jenny McKee, of color, who lives just North of London can tell many interesting things of her life. “Aunt Jenny” as she is called, is about eighty-five years of age, and says she thinks she is older than that as she can remember many things of the slave days. She tells of the old “masters” home and the negro shacks all in a row behind the home. She has a scar on her forehead received when she was pushed by one of the other little slaves, upon a marble mantle place and received a deep wound in her head. The old negro lady slaves would sit in the door way of their little shacks and play with pieces of string, not knowing what else to do to pass off the time. They were never restless for they knew no other life than slavery. Aunt Jenny McKee was born in Texas though she doesn’t know what town she was born in. She remembers when her mother was sold into the hands of another slave owner, the name of the place was White Ranch Louisiana. Her mother married again, and this time she went by the name of Redman, her mother’s second husband was named John Redman, and Aunt Jenny altho her real name was Jenny Garden,...

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Slave Narrative of Amelia Jones

Interviewer: Perry Larkey Person Interviewed: Amelia Jones Location: North London, Kentucky Place of Birth: Manchester, KY Age: 88 Concerning slaves of this section of the country, I will quote experiences and observation of an old negro lady who was a slave, Mrs. Amelia Jones, living in North London, Kentucky. “Aunt Amelia” as she is known around here is eighty-eight years of age, being sixteen years of age at the close of the Civil War. Mrs. Jones says, “I will tell as best I can remember, I was born eighty-eight years ago in Manchester, Ky. under a master by the name of Daw White. He was southern republican and was elected as congressman by that party from Manchester, Ky. He was the son of Hugh White, the original founder of Whitesberg, Ky. Master White was good to the slaves, he fed us well and had good places for us to sleep, and didn’t whip us only when it was necessary, but didn’t hesitate to sell any of his slaves, he said, “You all belong to me and if you don’t like it, I’ll put you in my pocket” meaning of course that he would sell that slave and put the money in his pocket. The day he was to sell the children from their mother he would tell that mother to go to some other place to do some work...

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Hammack, Oscar – Obituary

Alder Slope, Wallowa County, Oregon Oscar Hammock one of Wallowa county’s successful farmers, who with his wife retired from their Alder Slope farm and moved to Enterprise a few months ago, passed away Tuesday evening, August 29, 1967, at Wallowa Memorial hospital where he had been a patient for ten days. Funeral services will be conducted tomorrow (Friday) at 2 p.m. by the Bollman Funeral Home at the enterprise Community Church. Rev. James e. Jonees will officiate and Rachel Ann sutphin, sololist, will sing. Mrs. Gail Swart will be organist. Internment will be in the Enterprise cemetery. Honorary pallbearers will be: Ed Quin, Harold wade, Victor Searles, Robert Zollman, Dee Walker, Marion Jordan, Corda Locke, and Burl Kooch, and casket bearers will be Herman and Walter Stein, Kermit Wilson, Mervin Zollman, Jim Stubblefield, and Wayne Locke. Oscar was the son of W.J. and Mary hammack and was born July 18, 1895 in London, Kentucky, coming with his family to Wallowa county in 1903. On March 19, 1921 he was married at Enterprise to Carrie E. Ward who survives him. Other survivors include one daughter, Mrs. Gifford (Vernice) Botts of Enterprise; two sons, Vernon of Enterprise, and Harold of Toppenish, Wash; one brother, Walter od seattle; five grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Wallowa County Chieftain, August 31, 1967 Contributed by: Sue Wells and Gary...

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Benge, DeLora Mrs. – Obituary

Union, Union County, Oregon Died in Union, Saturday, May 26, 1927, Mrs. DeLora Benge, wife of David Benge, age 66 years. She was born at London, Kentucky, March 3, 1861, and came to the Grande Ronde Valley in 1907, where she has since resided. She is survived by her widowed husband and six children: Perry of Los Angeles, Cal., Lee of Strathmore, Cal., Jim, of Emmett, Idaho; Mrs. C. M. Porter and Mrs. E. B. Mires of Union; one niece-Mrs. Isaac Schaffer, of Island City, and 10 grandchildren. She was a devoted wife and mother, a good friend and neighbor and was ever thoughtful of those less fortunate than herself. She was a great sufferer in her last illness but bore all her pain with patience and fortitude. She will be sadly missed by all in her household. The funeral was held at the Methodist Church in Union Sunday, May 8, at 2:30 p.m., services by Rev. Meggers, of La Grande. Special music by the Union choir, prayer by Rev. Lee. A large crowd attended the funeral. Many old friends and neighbors from out of town were ion attendance. Interment in the Union cemetery. 1927 newspaper item Contributed by: Larry...

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Asher, Lou Veda – Obituary

Asher, Lou Veda Prineville, Oregon Lou Veda Asher passed away on Saturday, February 18, 2006 at Ochoco Care Center in Prineville, Ore. She was 90 years old. Visitation will be held from 2-7 p.m. on Thursday, February 23, 2006 at Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 185 NE 4th St, Prineville, Ore. Funeral Services will be held at 1 p.m. on Friday, February 24, 2006 at Missionary Baptist Church, 1870 NW Riverland Loop, Prineville, Ore. Pastor Jack Collier will officiate. Lou was born on July 4, 1915 to Charlie and Lillie (Chestnut) Hibbitts in Long Branch, Ky. After school she married Charles and started a family. She left London, Ky., in 1956 and moved to Prineville, Ore., where she spent the rest of her life. She was a Sunday school teacher and substitute school teacher. She was baptized in the Baptist Church in 1933. She was a member of Old Salem Baptist Church of London, Ky. Her hobbies included cooking, crocheting, playing checkers, gardening, sewing, quilting, horses, hunting deer and telling stories to her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Survivors include: her sons Mel and Diana Asher of Alfalfa, Ore., and Alvin and Carole Asher of Prineville, Ore.; daughter Billie Jean Smith of Prineville, Ore.; numerous nieces and nephews, six grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents, two sisters, two brothers, two sons, Bill and Calvin Asher, husband...

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Biography of Christopher Leonidas Aikman

Christopher Leonidas Aikman, who was admitted to the Kansas bar over a quarter of a century ago, had been in practice at El Dorado and much of the time had been an associate of his brother, Judge Aikman. He was born at London, Kentucky, October 22, 1865. He was six years of age when the family came to Butler County, Kansas, and here he attended country schools and the town schools at Augusta and El Dorado. He was also a student in the Fort Scott Normal College at Fort Scott, and for a number of years before entering the legal profession was a successful teacher. He taught at Towanda, Haverhill, Rosalia and White Station. After his admission to the bar in 1889 he was for two years a partner with the late Major Kilgore, of El Dorado. He was then associated with his brother Judge Aikman until 1905, when his brother was elevated to the bench of the District Court. In 1905 C. L. Aikman was elected county attorney of Butler County, was renominated without opposition in 1907 and re-elected, and in 1912 was again given the nomination without opposition, but declined to enter the campaign. In 1915 he and his brother Judge Aikman again formed a partnership. This firm stands in the front rank of lawyers in Southern Kansas. They have a large and profitable clientage, and their...

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Cemetery Hill

Cemetery Hill as it is known to us here, being in London, Ky. was a hill on which a Civil War battle was fought. The trenches are still here. The hill was given to the north to bury their dead by Jarvis Jackson, a great grand father of the Jarvis Jackson who is now city police of London, today. By some reason, the soldiers were taken up and moved to a different place only a few years ago. Mrs. Hoage says “the first daisies that were brought to this contry were put on that hill” and she can remember when the entire hill was covered with them. The southern side had trenches on the east side of the Dixie Highway on and surrounding the site where the Pennington Hospital is now standing, which are very vivid today. The London City School being in the path bears a hole today from a cannon ball. Shot no doubt from the Southern forces. The new addition to the school hides the hole, but until recent years it could be seen being about ten inches in diameter. Zollie Coffer a southern general had camped at Wild Cat, Ky. but was forced to retreat when general Garrad and Lucas and Stratton two captains under him, all from Clay county, with a large crowd came in. He, on his retreat came through London and had...

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