Location: London England

Descendants of Jonathan Dyer of Fall River, Mass.

Through three generations the Dyer family of Fall River, descendants of Jonathan Dyer, have been actively and prominently identified with the city’s commercial and social life; especially prominent has been for some forty years there in the great industrial life the present David Hartwell Dyer, who has been officially connected with a number of the large mills and is of the firm of D. H. Dyer & Son, civil and mechanical engineers, of which the junior member, George F. Dyer, is a thoroughly educated and expert electrical engineer.

Read More

Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

Read More

Biography of Charles E. Hart

“Let’s go to Hart’s Theatre tonight.” The writer took out his pencil and paper and started to figure out, just how many times San Mateans said these magic words each evening after supper as they were planning the evening’s amusement. How many times do they say this each month and how many hundreds of thousand times a year? Mr. Hart is known as the owner and manager of Hart’s Theatre located in the heart of town on B Street, and has earned the reputation of being a sterling business man who has made most of his money right here in San Mateo – and is spending it right here where he has earned it. Mr. Charles E. Hart was born in London on Dec. 15, 1869, and took up his residence in the United States eighteen years ago, having been a resident of California only eight in the moving Mateo with a the Elks built their home here, he leased the first floor for a moving picture and vaudeville theatre which proved a great success. From this investment he built Hart’s Theatre, a thoroughly up-to-date playhouse at a cost of $20,000, equipping it only a short time ago with a pipe organ that cost $6,000. It is an admitted fact that there is not a town on the Pacific coast the size of San Mateo that can boast of...

Read More

How It Came About That I Went To Canada.

All things are wonderfully ordered for us by God. Such has been my experience for a long time past. If only we will wait and watch, the way will open for us. Where shall I begin with my history as a Missionary? When I was a child, it was my mother’s hope and wish that I should bear the glad tidings of the Gospel to distant lands. She was a Missionary in heart herself, and it was her earnest desire that one of her boys would grow up to devote himself to that most blessed work. However there seemed little likelihood of her wishes being fulfilled. I disliked the idea of going to Oxford as my brothers had done. A wild free life away from the restraints of civilization was my idea of happiness, and after studying agriculture for a year or two in England, I bade farewell to my native shores and started for Canada. Then God took me in hand. I had been only three days in the country when He put it into my heart to become a Missionary. The impulse came suddenly, irresistibly. In a few days it was all settled. Farming was given up, and I entered upon my course as a theological student. That same summer I spent a month or six weeks on an Indian Reserve, and became, as people would say,...

Read More

Biography of Charles Dickens

Novelist and Social Reformer. In these days when critics so often repeat the cry of ‘art for art’s sake’ and denounce Ruskin for bringing moral canons into his judgments of pictures or buildings, it is dangerous to couple these two titles together, and to label Dickens as anything but a novelist pure and simple. And indeed, all would admit that the creator of Sam Weller and Sarah Gamp will live when the crusade against ‘Bumbledom’ and its abuses is forgotten and the need for such a crusade seems incredible. But when so many recent critics have done justice to...

Read More

Biography of John Lawrence

Indian Administrator. The north of Ireland and its Scoto-Irish stock has given birth to some of the toughest human material that our British Isles have produced. Of this stock was John Wesley, who at the age of eighty-five attributed his good health to rising every day at four and preaching every day at five. Of this was Arthur Wellesley, who never knew defeat and ‘never lost a British gun’. Of this was Alexander Lawrence, sole survivor among the officers of the storming party at Seringapatam, who lived to rear seven stout sons, five of whom went out to service...

Read More

Biography of Charles James Napier

The famous Napier brothers, Charles, George, and William, came of no mean parentage. Their father, Colonel the Hon. George Napier, of a distinguished Scotch family, was remarkable alike for physical strength and mental ability. In the fervor of his admiration his son Charles relates how he could ‘take a pewter quart and squeeze it flat in his hand like a bit of paper’. In height 6 feet 3 inches, in person very handsome, he won the admiration of others besides his sons. He had served in the American war, but his later years were passed in organizing work, and...

Read More

Biography of John Coleridge Patteson

Missionary. New Zealand, discovered by Captain Cook in 1769, lay derelict for half a century, and like others of our Colonies it came very near to passing under the rule of France. From this it was saved in 1840 by the foresight and energy of Gibbon Wakefield, who forced the hand of our reluctant Government; and its steady progress was secured by the sagacity of Sir George Grey, one of our greatest empire-builders in Australia, South Africa, and New Zealand. Thanks to them and to others, there has arisen in the Southern Pacific a state which, more than any...

Read More

Biography of Charles Kingsley

Parish Priest. If Charles Kingsley had been born in Scandinavia a thousand years earlier, one more valiant Viking would have sailed westward from the deep fiords of his native home to risk his fortunes in a new world, one who by his courage, his foresight, and his leadership of men was well fitted to be captain of his bark. The lover of the open-air life, the searcher after knowledge, the fighter that he was, he would have been in his element, foremost in the fray, most eager in the quest. But it was given to him to live in...

Read More

Why Not Bigger Than London

The great Creole city’s geographical position has always dazzled every eye except the cold, coy scrutiny of capital. “The position of New Orleans,” said President Jefferson in 1804, “certainly destines it to be the greatest city the world has ever seen.” He excepted neither Rouge nor Babylon. Put man’s most positive predictions are based upon contingencies; one unforeseen victory over nature bowls them down; the seeming certainties of tomorrow are changed to the opposite certainties of today; deserts become gardens, gardens cities, and older cities the haunts of bats and foxes. When the early Kentuckian and Ohioan accepted nature’s highway to market, and proposed the conquest of New Orleans in order to lay that highway open, they honestly believed there was no other possible outlet to the commercial world. When steam navigation came, they hailed it with joy and without question. To them it seemed an ultimate result. To the real-estate hoarding Creole, to the American merchant who was crowding and chafing him, to every superficial eye at least, it seemed a pledge of unlimited commercial empire bestowed by the laws of gravitation. Few saw in it the stepping stone from the old system of commerce by natural highways to a new system by direct and artificial lines. It is hard to understand, looking back from the present, how so extravagant a mistake could have been made by wise...

Read More

Biography of John MacDonald

John MacDonald of Topeka has probably done more for the cause of education in Kansas than any other one man, and in saying this no disparagement is intended for the scores of men and women who have devoted much of their lives to educational work. He may well be distinguished as a pioneer in the method of reason as applied to learning. His kindly personality has left a deep impress for good, and many who have achieved distinction in the different walks of life are indebted to him for their early training. Throughout his career he has evidently been impressed with the importance of the great truth that to educate is more important than to govern, since to train men wisely for self-government is more important than to govern them untrained. He is one of the men who have belped to vitalize education and the school system of the great State of Kansas. John MacDonald was born February 6, 1843, at Linshader, in the Lewis, a short distance from the Standing Stones of Callernish in the Parish of Uig, in the Hebrides. His birthplace will recall to a great many the land of Sheila, the “Princess of Thule,” made famous in the novel of that name by Black. When he was very small his people removed to the mainland of Scotland, to Gairloch in Wester Ross, where he was...

Read More

Biography of Charles A. Leavy, M. D.

Dr. Charles A. Leavy, who in the practice of medicine is specializing on diseases of the ear, nose and throat in St. Louis, was born in Palmyra, Missouri, September 25, 1873. His father, the late James Leavy, was a native of St. Louis, where his father, who was of Irish descent, settled at a very early day. James Leavy was a sculptor who won professional prominence and he was also a Civil war veteran who served with the rank of corporal in Company G, Thirtieth Missouri Volunteer Infantry for three and a half years, being wounded in the battle of Vicksburg. He died in Louisiana, Missouri, in 1911, when at the age of sixty-three years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary Saunders, was a native of Palmyra, Missouri, and died in 1880 at the age of thirty-eight years. In the family were three children, two of whom were daughters. Dr. Leavy, the second in order of birth, acquired a district school education in Ralls county and then attended the high school at New London, Missouri, and the Chillicothe (Mo.) Normal School, spending three years as a pupil in the latter institution. At length he determined upon the practice of medicine as a life work and was graduated from the Marion Sims Beaumont Medical College of St. Louis in 1903 with the M I. D. degree. He...

Read More

Biography of Henry W. Hermann, M.D

Dr. Henry W. Hermann, who has attained prominence in the field of neurology, was born on the 9th of June, 1855, at Hermansburg, Washington county, Arkansas, and is a son of Charles F. and Lena D. (Wilhelmi) Hermann. According to a genealogical record printed by C. F. Hermann, the first date mentioned in connection with the family in America is 1650. In a volume entitled Founders of Harman’s Station, Kentucky, it appears that one Heinrich Hermann from the same family reached America about the year 1700, penetrated as far west as the Mississippi river, and was celebrated as an Indian fighter. During the Revolutionary war his sons fought the British who had incited the Indians to make war upon the early settlers. The Wilhelmi genealogy dates back to 1525, naming a minister, the builder of a beautiful pulpit at Elprincen, Westphalia. The eldest son in this family has been a minister for nine generations and the father of Lena D. Wilhelmi also devoted his life to that holy calling. Charles F. Hermann left his home at Mannheim, Germany, in 1848 after the failure of the revolution when liberty loving men sought to establish a republic. Unsuccessful in this attempt he resolved to emigrate to America and enjoy the advantages, opportunities and liberties of the new world. Crossing the Atlantic he and his brother John founded the town of Hermansburg,...

Read More

Biography of Edward Morrish, M.D.

Dr. Edward Morrish, a physician and surgeon of St. Louis, was born in Devonshire, England, September 2, 1872. His father, the late William Morrish, was also a native of England, where he followed agricultural pursuits. He married Elizabeth Cudmore, who was likewise born in Devonshire, and there both passed away, the father at the age of sixty-seven years and the mother in 1916, when seventy-three years of age. They had a family of twin sons and a daughter, the latter being Lucy, now the wife of J. Pennington, while Edmond, the twin of Edward, is now residing in England. Dr. Morrish was educated in the schools of Devonshire and in 1892, when twenty years of age, sought the opportunities of the new world, crossing the Atlantic to America. He made his way at once to St. Louis, where he was employed in clerical lines, but at length he determined to engage in the practice of medicine and with this end in view entered the Beaumont Medical College in 1897, being there graduated with the M. D. degree in 1900. After completing his course he served for a year as interne in the St. Louis Protestant Hospital and then entered upon private practice, in which he has continued successfully to the present time. He does not specialize along a particular line but gives his attention to general practice with excellent...

Read More

Biography of Henry W. Curtis

There is a sprinkling of English blood in Idaho which adds to the moral and financial vitality of the state. One of the leading citizens of Blackfoot of English birth is ex-County Treasurer Henry W. Curtis, who was also the pioneer hardware merchant of that city. Mr. Curtis was born in London, England, August 9, 1854. His father, Joseph H. Curtis, of an old English family, married Miss Sarah Morrell, a native of London. They had seven children born to them in England, and in 1860 they came to the United States, to found a home in the New World. Mr. Curtis was a silk-weaver by trade and for about a year was employed at stocking-weaving in Philadelphia. In 1861 the family moved to Utah, and there the father died in 1877, aged sixty-four years. His wife has attained the age of eighty-four, and their children are all living. Henry W. Curtis, the youngest of the seven, was educated in public schools of Utah and began to earn his living at the early age of nine years. He has not only depended on himself since that time, but has helped others, and may be called a self-educated man. In his early efforts to get on in the world he engaged four years in freighting from Corinne, Utah, to different points in Montana. In 1874 he embarked in the hardware...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest