Location: Lincoln County KY

Biography of William Pearle

William Pearle, of Virginia, settled in Lincoln County, Kentucky, among the first settlers of that State. During a portion of the Indian troubles he took refuge with his family in the fort at Crab Orchard. His son, Henry, married Polly Owsley, sister of Governor Owsley, of Kentucky, by whom he had twelve children, seven of whom lived to be grown. The names of the latter were Samuel, William S. F., Patience, Joel, Henry, Nudigit O., and Catharine. Samuel married Sally Dugan, and settled in Warren County, Missouri, in 1830. Joel married Rebecca Wyatt, and settled in Montgomery County. Henry married his cousin, Sally A. Pearle, and settled in Montgomery County in 1833. He was a school teacher and farmer, and concluded once that he could preach as well as anybody. So he gave out an appointment at the school house, and when the time arrived, a large congregation was in attendance to hear him. . He gave out the hymn, sang, and led in prayer as well as any one, but when he arose to preach his subject flew from his brain,”as he graphically expressed it, and he could not preach at all. He apologized by saving, “We thought we could preach, but we can’t preach,” and took his seat. Another incident of an entirely different character, but equally embarrassing, happened to him soon after he came to Montgomery...

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Slave Narrative of Mandy Cooper

Interviewer: Wm R. Mays Person Interviewed: Frank Cooper Narrative of: Mandy Cooper Location: 715 Ott St., Franklin, Indiana Died at Age: 115 Wm. R. Mays Dist. 4 Johnson County, Ind. July 29, 1937 SLAVERY DAYS OF MANDY COOPER OF LINCOLN COUNTY, KENTUCKY FRANK COOPER 715 Ott St., Franklin, Ind. Frank Cooper, an aged colored man of Franklin, relates some very interesting conditions that existed in slavery days as handed down to him by his mother. Mandy Cooper, the mother of Frank Cooper, was 115 years old when she died; she was owned by three different families: the Good’s, the Burton’s, and the Cooper’s, all of Lincoln Co. Kentucky. “Well, Ah reckon Ah am one of the oldest colored men hereabouts,” confessed aged Frank Cooper. “What did you all want to see me about?” My mission being stated, he related one of the strangest categories alluding to his mother’s slave life that I have ever heard. “One day while mah mammy was washing her back my sistah noticed ugly disfiguring scars on it. Inquiring about them, we found, much to our amazement, that they were mammy’s relics of the now gone, if not forgotten, slave days. “This was her first reference to her “misery days” that she had evah made in my presence. Of course we all thought she was tellin’ us a big story and we made fun of...

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Slave Narrative of Bert Mayfield

Interviewer: Eliza Ison Person Interviewed: Bert Mayfield Location: Lancaster, Kentucky Place of Birth: Garrard County KY Date of Birth: May 29, 1852 Garrard County. Ex-Slave Stories. (Eliza Ison) Interview with Bert Mayfield: Bert Mayfield was born in Garrard County, May 29, 1852, two miles south of Bryantsville on Smith Stone’s place. His father and mother were Ped and Matilda Stone Mayfield, who were slaves of Smith Stone who came from Virginia. His brothers were John, Harrison, Jerry, and Laurence, who died at an early age. He lived on a large plantation with a large old farm house, built of logs and weatherboards, painted white. There were four rooms on the first floor, and there were also finished rooms on the second floor. An attic contained most of the clothes needed for the slaves. “Uncle Bert” in his own language says, “On Christmas each of us stood in line to get our clothes; we were measured with a string which was made by a cobbler. The material had been woben by the slaves in a plantation shop. The flax and hemp were raised on the plantation. The younger slaves had to “swingle it” with a wooden instrument, somewhat like a sword, about two feet long, and called a swingler. The hemp was hackled by the older slaves. The hackle was an instrument made of iron teeth, about four inches long,...

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Biography of William Potter Campbell

There had been no period in the long and significantly active, vigorous and varied career of Judge Campbell in which there had been any possibility of submerging his incisive individuality. As a youthful and gallant soldier of the Union in the Civil war, as a lawver and jurist, as a man of large and benignant influence in public affairs and as one of the honored pioneers of Kansas he had left a record that shall ever refiect honor upon his name and memory. He had been most elosely and influentially associated with civis and material development and progress in the Sunflower State and is still engaged in the active practice of his profession as one of the leading members of the bar of the City of Wichita. Judge William Potter Campbell, a scion of staunch Scotch-Irish ancestry, was born at Stanford, the judicial center of Lincoln County, Kentucky, on the 18th of February, 1843, and as a youth he received the advantages of the old Presbyterian Academy at Stanford. As the year of his nativity indicates, he was a youth of eighteen years at the time when the Civil war was precipitated on the divided nation, and he promptly manifested his intrinsic loyalty and patriotism by tendering his aid in defense of the Union. He first enlisted as a member of the First Kentucky Cavalry, and after the expiration...

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Biography of Hon. James D. Gideon

HON. JAMES D. GIDEON. No better citizens have come to Christian County, Missouri, than those who crossed the Mississippi River from Tennessee, and who brought as their inheritance the traits of character and life which has ever distinguished them. Hon. James D. Gideon, who is one of the foremost farmers and stockraisers of Union Township, Stone County, first saw the light in Hawkins County, Tennessee, in 1833. His parents, John and Polly (Evans) Gideon, were also natives of that State, the father born in Hawkins and the mother in Jefferson County. Both were fairly well educated for those days, and made their home in Tennessee until 1843, when they removed to Lincoln County, Kentucky Six years later, or in 1849, Mr. Gideon came on foot to what is now Christian County, and being a clock tinker he made the trip to work at his trade. He remained in this State until 1853, having in the meantime taken up a claim in what is now the southeastern part of Christian County (then Taney County), and then returned to Kentucky to get his family. He then settled on his claim, improved a good farm, but during the war he sold this and moved to Greene County. After the war, in 1866, he returned to this county and located on Bear Creek, where his death occurred in 1870, when sixty-six years of...

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Lincoln County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Lincoln County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Hosted at Lincoln County USGenWeb Archives Project Alcorn Surname Hosted at Carroll County, Kentucky KYGenWeb 1790 First Census of Kentucky – Surname Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Lincoln County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Lincoln County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Lincoln County USGenWeb Archives Project Heads Of Household Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Lincoln County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Lincoln County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Lincoln County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Alphabetical Index Pages 02-14 Pages 15-30 Pages 31-44 Pages 45-58 Pages 59-72 Pages 73-82 Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Lincoln County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 Lincoln County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Lincoln County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Alphabetical Index Pages 330-333 Pages  334-338 Pages  339-343 Pages 344-347 Pages 348-352 Pages 353-356 Pages  357-361 Pages  362-366 Pages 367-373 Hosted at Census Guide...

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Lincoln County, Kentucky Cemetery Records

Lincoln County Lincoln County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Lincoln County USGenWeb Archives Project Crab Orchard Baptist Church Cemetery Davis Family Cemetery Drakes Creek Cemetery Stephenson-Vardeman-Holmes Cemetery Lincoln County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Lincoln County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Abrahm’s/Abraham’s Cemetery Bastin Family Graveyard Benedict Cemetery Berry Hollow Cemetery Buffalo Springs Cemetery Caldwell Cemetery Clark Newland Cemetery  Clear Fork Cemetery Coldiron Cemetery Cook’s Point Cemetery Crab Orchard Cemetery Dix River Church of Christ Cemetery aka Dix’s River Church of Christ Double Springs Cemetery Eason Cemetery Ephesus Church Fairview Church  Friendship Baptist Church Gooch Cemetery Goshen Cemetery Harris Cemetery Highland United Methodist Church Cemetery Hugh Caldwell Family Graveyard Hustonville Cemetery Johnston Elliott Farm Cemetery Knights of Pythias Cemetery Lee Graveyard Lutheran Church Cemetery Manuel Family Cemetery McCormack Cemetery McCormack Church Cemetery  McKinney Family Cemetery McKinney Graveyard McKinney Graveyard 2 Miller-Fish Cemetery Moreland Cemetery Mt Hebron Baptist Church Cemetery Mt Moriah Christian Church  Mt Olive Cemetery Mt Olive Church  Mt Zion Church Neal Cemetery Negro Creek Cemetery New Salem Cemetery Newland Family Cemetery Old Reform Church Cemetery Old Trowbridge Cemetery Old Waynesburg Cemetery Olive Baptist Church Cemetery Parlor Grove Cemetery  Pilot Baptist Church Cemetery Pine Grove Church of Christ Cemetery Point Pleasant Baptist Church Cemetery St Sylvester Catholic Church Sims Cemetery Wilcher Cemetery Young Family Burial...

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Biographical Sketch of Benjamin N. Woodson

County Attorney of Fannin County, was born in Lincoln County, Kentucky, in 1850; came with his father to this state, four years later. He grew up, and was partly educated at Honey Grove. In 1872, he attended school at Glascow, Missouri, from which place he went to New York City, studied law and obtained his diploma in a law school of that city. Not long after this, he was admitted to the bar and licensed to practice by Judge Davis, of New York. In 1875, he came back to Honey Grove, but afterwards moved to Ladonia, where he remained until elected county attorney in 1884, when he, with his interesting family, removed to...

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Biography of Dr. Thomas Jefferson Bailey

Dr. Bailey was a native of Kentucky, born in Lincoln county, January 17, 1803, whith his father, John Bailey, had removed with his family from Virginia. There the father died, and Thomas J. grew up to manhood. He read medicine at Danville under the able preceptor ship of Drs. Smith and McDowell, till he was prepared for practice. Prior to removing to Missouri, in 1828, he married Miss Harriet Sproul, a native of the same county as himself. He settled first in Ralls county, this State, where he practiced medicine till 1837, removing thence to Springfield, when that town was a mere hamlet. Both himself and wife were well pleased, and, resolving to stay, located on a forty-acre tract between the two cities of Springfield. Here he began a most successful professional career, and for nearly a quarter of a century ministered to the sick in his plain, simple way that built him the large practice out of which he realized a fortune. His sympathetic disposition and moderate charges made him beloved of all, no one ever complaining of excessive bills. His plain style won confidence, and he was never a man to judge others by dress or outward appearance; but always looked within to find the man. He thoroughly believed that ” ‘Twas not in rank or wealth or state, but ‘get up and get’ that makes men great.” Dr....

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