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Location: Lexington County SC

Slave Narrative of Uncle Sabe Rutledge

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Mrs. Genevieve W. Chandler Person Interviewed: Sabe Rutledge Location: Burgess, South Carolina Date of Birth: 1861 Place of Birth: Horry County SC (Testimony given by old man born 1861, The Ark Plantation. Horry County, owned by Mr. John Tillman) “Fust thing I realize to remember, I nuster cry to go to the old boss—old Massa—for sugar. Massa say: “‘Martha, what Newman (he call me that) crying for?’ Ma say, ‘Wanter come to you for sugar!’ “‘Bring the boy here, Martha!’ “He gi’e me sugar. “Boil salt? Pump! Pump! Pump it! Had a tank. Run from hill to sea. Had a platform similar to wharf. And pump on platform. Fetch good high. Go out there on platform. Force pump. My Grandmother boil salt way after Freedom. We tote water. Tote in pidgin and keeler—make out of cedar and cypress. No ‘ting to crove ’em (groove ’em) compass. Dog-wood and oak rim. Give it a lap. (This was his description, with pantomime, of the way pidgin and keelers were made by plantation carpenters) “My Grandmother had two pots going. Boil all day and all night. Biling. Boil till he ticken (thicken) Cedar paddles stir with. Chillun eat with wooden spoons. Clay pot? Just broken piece. Indian had big camping ground on beach near the Ark. After big blow...

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Slave Narrative of Sam Rawls

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: G. Leland Summer Person Interviewed: Sam Rawls Date of Interview: June 9, 1937 Location: Newberry, South Carolina Place of Birth: Lexington County, SC Date of Birth: 1835 Stories From Ex-Slaves “I was born in 1835 in Lexington County, S.C. I know I was 12 years old de last year of de war. I belonged to John Hiller in Lexington County, near Columbia, S.C. Old Marse Hiller was strict to his slaves, wasn’t mean, but often whipped ’em. I thought it was all right then. When de Yankees come through burning, killing and stealing stock, I was in marse’s yard. Dey come up whar de boss was standing, told him dere was going to be a battle, grabbed him and hit him. Dey burned his house, stole de stock, and one Yankee stuck his sword to my breast and said fer me to come wid him or he would kill me. O’ course I went along. Dey took me as fer as Broad River, on t’other side o’ Chapin; then turned me loose and told me to run fast or they would shoot me. I went fast and found my way back home by watching de sun. Dey told me to not go back to dat old man. “De slaves never learnt to read and write....

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Lexington County, South Carolina Census Records

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now   1790 Lexington County, South Carolina Census Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1790 Lexington County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1790 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Lexington County, South Carolina Census Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1800 Lexington County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Lexington County, South Carolina Census Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1810 Lexington County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Lexington County, South Carolina Census Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1820 Lexington County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Lexington County, South Carolina Census Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1830 Lexington County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Lexington County, South Carolina Census Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial...

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Hardman, Wallace Emery “Wally” – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Baker City, Oregon Wallace Emery “Wally” Hardman, 81, a lifetime Baker City resident, died Feb. 15, 2002, at his home. His funeral will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Gray’s West & Co. Pioneer Chapel, 1500 Dewey Ave. The Rev. Lura Kidner-Miesen of the United Methodist Church and the Rev. Raymond Bates of SonRise Free Methodist Church at La Grande will officiate. Vault interment will be in Mount Hope Cemetery. Military rites will be accorded by the Baker City Veterans of Foreign Wars. There will be a reception afterward at the United Methodist Church, 1919 Second St. Visitations will be from 5 o’clock to 7 o’clock tonight at Gray’s West & Co., 1500 Dewey Ave. Wally was born Jan. 15, 1921, at Baker City to Oliver Monroe Hardman and Elsie Tureman Hardman. He spent his life in the Baker and Burnt River valleys, except for the time he spent in the Air Force defending our country during World War II. Wally grew up in Union on his parents’ ranch, later moving to the Muddy Creek area where he graduated from high school in 1939. His greatest interests were sports and ranching. He joined the U.S. Air Force in 1940 and served in Alaska, flying missions during the Aleutian Campaign. He married Betty Marie Emele on March...

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Biography of Col. R. H. Taylor

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Mr. Woodson is a good lawyer, a conscientious officer and a vigorous and successful prosecutor. Of this county, was born in Columbia, South Carolina, in 1825. He began the study of law in the law office of Judge Warner, and was admitted to the bar by a special act of the legislature at the age of 18 years. He moved to Fannin County in 1844, and his abilities as a ‘lawyer were soon recognized, and. he was employed upon one side or the other of every important suit; both criminal and civil, in the county. In a few years, his reputation as a lawyer spread over north Texas, and later still, over the entire state. As a lawyer, he has been successful, both at the bar, and in a financial sense. The name of “Bob” Taylor has been closely connected with local, state and national politics in the county and in the state since 1845. From precinct organizations, to national conventions, inclusive, his voice and sound judgment has helped to shape the destinies of his party. Before the war, he was a Whig and strong Unionist, after the war, an active republican. He was elected to the legislature first in 1850, and served consecutively until 1861, in the legislature of which year he made the speech...

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