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Location: Lewiston Idaho

Prominent Cities and Towns of the State

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Boise, The Capital City The following descriptive article is an excerpt from the souvenir edition of the Boise Sentinel, issued in June 1897: So much has been said and written and sung of “Boise, the Beautiful,” that the task of saying any-thing new seems utterly hopeless; and of this there is little need. While those who have made their homes here from the beginning, and those who from year to year have come to stay, might naturally be expected to be most fervent in their praises, they have not always been the happiest in laying appropriate tributes before the shrine of the object of their love and admiration. Strangers and transient visitors have often been more fortunate in their offerings. Perhaps the first question that arises in the mind of a stranger in regard to this locality is why was it so named. After more than a third of a century has passed since the first human habitation was erected on the present site of the town, and after the story has been so often repeated in print, the inquiry continues to be daily made. Why Boise? Briefly, this is what the ancient chroniclers tell of the origin of the name: In the summer of 1834 a party of French Canadian voyagers, belonging to the expedition...

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Biographical Sketch of Robert Newell

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now ROBERT NEWELL. – “Doc” Newell, as he was commonly called, was one of the same breed of pioneers as Jo Meek. He was, in fact, associated with the latter for many years in the wild, trapping life on the border; and when that was given up he went with the rest of the little company of trappers to Oregon and became one of the state-builders there. He was born near Zanesville, Ohio, on the 30th of March, 1807. After having spent some time in Cincinnati, in learning the saddler’s trade, he was led by his adventurous disposition to go with a trapping party, in his eighteenth year, to the Rocky Mountains. It was there that he became acquainted with Joe Meek. Te friendship of the two rough but warm-hearted trappers deepened into the closest intimacy; and in after years they stood by each other through thick and thin. Newell went with Meek, Doty, Walker, Wilkins, Ebberts and Larison, in 1840, to the Tualatin Plains, where most of the number became permanent residents. Newell himself bore an honorable part in the affairs of the growing state; and, although he had had few advantages of early education, he possessed a natural intelligence and force of character which gave him due recognition among the strong-headed men of our early...

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Biography of William F. Kettenbach

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now William F. Kettenbach now deceased, was one of Lewiston’s most enterprising and successful businessmen, and for many years was president of the Lewiston National Bank. He left the impress of his individuality upon the commercial life and prosperity of the city, and his history forms an important chapter in the annals of the growth and development of this section of the state. He was born in New York City, May 15, 1849, just two days after the arrival of his parents, Henry and Elizabeth Kettenbach, from Germany. They were natives of that land. The father was descended from one of the noble families of Germany, and held the office of colonel of cavalry at Wurtzburg. On coming to America he took his family to Indianapolis, Indiana, and there the subject of this review was educated. When sixteen years of age he left school and proceeded to the frontier, where he was in the government service, acting as a scout with Kit Carson and Buffalo Bill. After the civil war he for some years acted as guide to emigrant trains across the plains, and then returned to Indianapolis, where he was engaged in the wholesale and retail grocery business for three years. He then devoted his energies to conducting a hardware store, and in the meantime invested...

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Biography of General Edward McConville

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In the recent trial of arms in which America won recognition and admiration never before accorded her by the older “powers” of Europe, there was no more distinguished or valiant soldier than General McConville, of Idaho, who went forth as one of the commanders of the Idaho troops and laid down his life on the altar of his country. His was a noble life and a glorious death, and his name is enduringly inscribed on the roll of America’s heroes. Though his loss is deeply mourned by his many friends, his memory will ever be cherished by all who knew him, and the cause of liberty will acknowledge its advancement to him and his compatriots who have fallen in defense of the honor of the flag and the noble principles of republicanism and justice which it represents. General McConville was a native of New York, his birth having occurred at Cape Vincent, Jefferson County, June 25, 1846. The history of the family furnishes many examples of valor, for since the days when William the Conqueror fought the battle of Hastings its representatives have won honor and fame in the military and naval service of France, England, Ireland and America. The family had its origin in France, it’s branches being found in Brittany, Gascony and Normandy. Two...

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Biography of J. D. C. Thiessen

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now One of the best known and most successful sheep-raisers and wool-growers of Idaho is J. D. C. Thiessen, of Lewiston. A native of Holstein, Germany, he was born February 16, 1843, and is of Danish ancestry, although his parents, John D. and Alary (Hanchild) Thiessen, were both natives of Germany. The father was a farmer and trader. In religious faith both he and his wife were Lutherans, and the former lived to be fifty-four years of age, while the mother departed this life in her fifty-sixth year. Mr. Thiessen of this review is the fourth in their family of seven children. He was educated in his native land, and when twenty-three years of age emigrated to the United States, reaching New York in 1866. Two years later he came to San Francisco, where he pursued a course in a commercial school and was thus fitted for life’s practical duties. He did not come to this country entirely empty-handed, as so many have done, having had five hundred dollars on his arrival. He was however, ignorant of the English language, and had to meet other difficulties. After having spent several years in America, he received three thousand dollars from his father’s estate, but lost it in mining enterprises in California and Nevada, and when he arrived in...

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Biography of William Lauer

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Since the establishment of Payette William Lauer has been identified with its development and upbuilding, and his labors have been most effective in promoting its welfare. He is the pioneer hardware merchant of the town, and still continues in that line of business, his well directed efforts bringing him success. He is among the worthy citizens that the Fatherland has furnished to the New World, his birth having occurred in Germany on the nth of November 1833. In his youth he crossed the Atlantic to New York with his father, Isaac Lauer, who made his home in the eastern metropolis until called to his final rest. His death occurred in his eightieth year. William Lauer had attended the public schools, of his native land, and was fifteen years of age when he came to America. He learned the tinner’s trade in New York City, and there remained for seven years, when he resolved to leave the Atlantic coast and seek a home on the Pacific coast. In 1854 he sailed from New York to San Francisco, and engaged in merchandising in Siskiyou County, California, where he remained until 1861, when he came to Idaho, attracted by the Oro Fino excitement. He engaged in clerking and also in placer mining, but his efforts in the latter direction...

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Biography of John M. Silcott

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Almost forty years have passed since John M. Silcott took up his residence in Idaho, and he is therefore one of the oldest and most widely known pioneers of the state. He came in the spring of 1860 to establish the government Indian agency at Lapwai, and has since been identified with the growth and development of this section. He is a Virginian, his birth having occurred in Loudoun County, of the Old Dominion, January 14, 1824. His French and Scotch ancestors were early settlers there, and during the Revolution and the war of 18 12 representatives of the family loyally served their country on the field of battle. William Silcott, the father of our subject, married Sarah Violet, a lady of Scotch ancestry, and about 1828 they removed with the family to Zanesville, Ohio, where the father engaged in business as a contractor and builder. He was liberal in his religious views, and his wife held the faith of the Presbyterian Church. His political support was given the Whig party and the principles advocated by Henry Clay. Only two children of the family of five are now living, the sister being Sarah T., who married Captain Abrams, of Brownsville, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Abrams now makes her home in Baltimore, Maryland. In 1845 the family removed to...

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Biography of Perrin Beza Whitman

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The name of Perrin Beza Whitman is indelibly inscribed on the pages of the history of the northwest, for throughout the period of its development he was an active factor in promoting its interests and is numbered among the honored pioneers who made possible its later-day progress and prosperity. The lot of the pioneer of the northwest has been a peculiarly hard one. The Indians, driven from their hunting grounds farther east, have cherished the resentment characteristic of the race, and have met as foes the brave band of white men who came to the western wilderness to reclaim the lands for purposes of civilization and to garner the riches of nature for themselves and families. Not only were the pioneers met by the hostility of the Indians, but vast stretches of sandy plains and almost impassable mountains separated them from the comforts and conveniences of the east, and their lot was one of danger, difficulty, hardship and toil. A courageous spirit, an unconquerable determination and steadfast purpose, these were the qualities demanded of the pioneers, and such characteristics enabled Mr. Whitman to meet conditions before which many another man would have quailed. He was the adopted son and nephew of the renowned Indian missionary, Dr. Marcus Whitman, who was massacred by the Indians in 1847....

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Biography of George Pettengill

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The subject of this review is one whose history touches the pioneer epoch in the annals of the state of Idaho, and whose days form an integral part of that indissoluble chain which linked the early formative period with that of latter day progress and prosperity. Not alone is there particular interest attaching to his career as one of the pioneers of Idaho, but in reviewing his genealogical record we find his lineage tracing back to the colonial history of the nation and to that period which marked the inception of the grandest republic the world has ever known. Through such sources have we attained the true American type, and along this line must our investigations proceed if we would learn of the steadfast and unyielding elements which constitute the basis upon which has been reared the lofty and magnificent superstructure of an en-lightened and favored commonwealth. In 1620 Richard Pettengill was born in Staffordshire, England, and in 1641 he landed on the shores of New England, there to found a family that has sent its branches out into various sections of the country. He married Johanna Ingersol, and their son, Samuel, was married February 3, 1674, to Sarah Poor. On the 18th of December. 1692, was born to them a son, to whom they gave...

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Biography of Milton Kelly

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Judge Milton Kelly, now deceased, who attained considerable prominence as one of Idaho’s most loyal citizens and public-spirited men, was born in Onondaga County, New York, September 9, 1818, and descended from Irish ancestors who were early settlers in New England. He was reared on his father’s farm, obtaining his early education in Bloomfield, New York, and when still young taught school. He went to Ohio, subsequently removing to Wisconsin, where for some time he was engaged in the mercantile business, and then studied law and was admitted to the bar about 1845. He then took up the practice of his profession, for which he was peculiarly fitted by his natural abilities, and during his thirteen years of active professional life in Wisconsin he became intimately acquainted with the leading men and was prominently identified with shaping the destiny of the then new state. In 1861 Judge Kelly went to California and the following year removed to the new mining town of Auburn, Oregon, where he engaged in the express and transportation business, between that town and Placerville, Boise County, Idaho, later making his home in Placerville. In the autumn of 1863, following the act of organization of the territory of Idaho, he was, at an election held in Boise County, elected a member of the...

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Biography of Ephraim W. Baughman

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Few men are more widely known in the northwest than Captain E. W. Baughman, of Lewiston, who for forty-eight years has sailed on the rivers in this section of the country. His circle of friends is indeed extensive, and his genial manner and social disposition win him the regard of all. He was born in Fulton County, Illinois, May 18, 1835, and is of German lineage, his ancestors having long been residents of Pennsylvania, however. His father, John Baughman, was born in that state and married Miss Jane Murphy, a lady of German descent. In an early day they removed to Illinois, settling in the west before the Black Hawk war. The father secured a farm in Fulton County and there reared his family of nine children, four of whom are yet living. He departed this life in the eightieth year of his age, and his wife passed away when about the same age Captain Baughman, their fifth child, was reared in the state of his nativity until his sixteenth year, and then crossed the plains with ox teams to California, in 1850. The party with which he traveled took with them a year’s provisions, but found they had more than they needed, and on reaching California they sold their surplus supply of flour, bacon, beans...

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Biography of James C. Hanson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The Danish citizens of the United States are more nearly identical with our Anglo-American race than any other citizens of foreign birth. They possess the spirit which we call “go-aheaditiveness” in as large measure as any of our citizens, and they become Americanized and assimilate with the older population of our country sooner perhaps than foreigners of any other race. They are industrious, take to business on broad principles and are about as certain to make successes as any people among us. James C. Hanson, one of the prominent farmers of Latah County, Idaho, is not by any means one of the exceptions that prove this rule. He belongs rather to the large majority whose progressive and intelligent industry is having an influence more and more marked on our general prosperity as we approach the beginning of a new century. Mr. Hanson was a pioneer in Latah County and is one of its most prominent citizens. He located in Idaho in 1872, before there had come into existence anything to so much as foreshadow the inception and development of the city of Genesee, and he not only witnessed but has assisted in the opening up and improvement of Latah and her sister counties. Mr. Hanson was born in Denmark and was educated and began his active...

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Biography of Warren P. Hunt

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Warren Palmerton Hunt, who has been a highly respected citizen of Lewiston since 1862, and is numbered among the California pioneers of 1854, was born in Erie County, New York, March 13, 1832, a son of Isaac and Diantha (Allbee) Hunt, the former a native of Vermont and the latter of the Empire state. In 1852 the father went by way of the Cape Horn route to California, but returned to his farm in Erie County, where he made his home until his death, which occurred in the eighty-sixth year of his age. His wife passed away in her eighty-second year, and both died on the old family homestead in New York, where they had spent the greater part of their lives. They were honest, industrious farming people, highly respected by all. They held membership in the Christian church, and Mr. Hunt gave his political support to the Republican party. Warren P. Hunt was the eldest in their family of three children, and was reared upon the old homestead, attending the public schools through the winter months, while in the summer he assisted in the labors of field and meadow. In 1854 he sailed from New York for San Francisco, reaching the latter place after a month’s voyage. He then went directly to the mines in...

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Biography of Ezra Baird

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In the year which witnessed the arrival of so many of Idaho’s prominent pioneers. 1862 this gentleman cast in his lot with the early settlers, and through the period which has since elapsed he has been an important factor in the development and progress of the state. He is a native of Schoharie County, New York, born May 11, 1839, and is of Scotch and English descent. His ancestors came to America in colonial days and the maternal great-grandfather of our subject. Major Norton, fought throughout the struggle for independence. Joseph Baird, the father of our subject, was born in New York, and married Miss Sally Ann Gifford. For many years he engaged in the operation of a flouring mill, but in 1849 took up his residence upon a farm near Binghamton, New York, where he spent the remainder of his life. He took an active part in public affairs, and held various county offices, discharging his duties with marked promptness and fidelity. Both he and his wife were faithful members of the Episcopal Church. The former departed this life in the fifty-ninth year of his age, the latter in her seventy-seventh year. They had a family of four sons and three daughters, of whom five are living. Ezra Baird was reared and educated in Binghamton,...

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Biography of Mrs. Lucinda J. Brearley

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In a history of the settlement of a state there is usually but slight reference made to the part which the women have taken in its development. This is, of course, due to the more active connection of the pioneer men with public life, while the wives, mothers and daughters are concerned in the duties of home making. Great credit, however, is due the brave pioneer women, who stand courageously by the side of husbands and fathers, sharing with them in the hardships and dangers which accompany the development of a new section; nor is their influence a minor factor in the social, educational and moral life of the community, and therefore the names of such esteemed pioneer ladies as Mrs. Brearley well deserve a place by the side of those of the men who have laid the foundations for the growth and prosper-ity of a newly developed region. Her husband, John Brearley, was the pioneer banker of Lewiston, and for many years was connected with its business interests. He was born in Hudson, Michigan, in 1839. His parents being early settlers of that state. In 1855 he crossed the plains with an ox team and spent several years in Sacramento. In 1862 he removed to Elk City, where he engaged in mining, making considerable money,...

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