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Location: Leicester England

Baxter, Joyce Viola – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Summerville, Oregon Joyce Viola Baxter, 86, of Summerville, died Sept. 22 at a local care center. A service will be held later in Yakima. Daniels Chapel of the Valley is in charge of arrangements. Joyce was born on June 4, 1921, to Henry Harry and Hilda (Hall) Brown in Leicester, England. She was raised and educated in England. During World War II she enlisted in the British WAAF, serving in London with the balloon barrage troops. They deployed large zeppelin-shaped balloons during the Blitz, not allowing the German bombers to fly in low to inflict more damage. During the war she met and married Donald McNeil Baxter of Yakima. After the war Donald returned to the United States with the other American troops. She soon followed with their son David, also by ship. The two then traveled by train from New York City until they reached Yakima. Those who knew her say Joyce was extremely proud that she became a United States citizen and was grateful to the American troops that came to aid the British in the war effort. She enjoyed oil painting, writing poetry and reading poetry to nursing home residents. Her husband preceded her in death on Nov. 2, 1990. She moved to Summerville in 1998 to be near her family. Survivors at...

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Biography of William C. Noon

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now William C. Noon was born in Leicester, England, in 1835. At the age of nine years he came with his parents to America, settling in Andover, Massachusetts, where his father found employment at his trade in a woolen mill. He received the benefits of a common school education until thirteen years old when he began to work in a woolen mill at Andover. He was employed for several years thereafter in similar mills at Lawrence and Worcester, Massachusetts, and for some three or four years in the State of Maine. During this period he acquired a very thorough knowledge of the business and became very proficient, especially in carding and spinning. The memorable financial depression of 1857 was particularly severe on the eastern woolen manufacturers and all of them were either forced to suspend operation or continue their business on the most limited scale. Nearly all the weavers in the Eastern States were thrown out of employment. Mr. Noon not being able to secure work at his trade sought new avenues in which he might gain a livelihood. At this time the discoveries of gold in California were attracting immigration from all parts of the country, and in the spring of 1858 Mr. Noon started for the Pacific Coast, at the time having only sufficient money...

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