Location: Lee County AL

North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana

The Indians all over this continent had names, traditions, religions, ceremonies, feasts, prayers, songs, dances all, more or less, with symbolism and allegory, adapted to circumstances, just as all other races of mankind. But the world has become so familiar with the continued and ridiculous publications in regard to everything touching upon that race of people that a universal doubt has long since been created and established as to the possibility of refinement of thought and nobleness of action ever having existed among the North American Indian race, ancient or modern; and so little of truth has also been learned regarding the real and true inner life of that peculiar and seemingly isolated race of mankind, that today only here and there can one be found who, from a lifetime association and intimate acquaintance, is well versed in Indian thought, feeling and character, and able to unfold and record the solution of that imagined mystery known as “The Indian Problem,” since they learned it from the Indians themselves. From the Indians own lips they were taught its elucidation, and only as it could be taught and learned, but never again can be taught and learned. Even as various nations of antiquity of, the eastern continent have left the evidences of their former occupation by the geographical names that still exist, so to have the North American Indians left their...

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Biography of William Alexander Hood

William Alexander Hood brought his extensive experience as a manufacturer, mining operator and oil and gas producer to Independence about three years ago, and is now rated as one of the leading producers in that field and also conducts a large business as a general contractor. He is of old Southern stock, and his Scotch-Irish ancestors came from England to North Carolina in colonial times. William Alexander Hood was born in Birmingham, Alabama, October 6, 1876. His family connections in that great industrial center of the South have long been prominent in manufacturing and commercial affairs. His father, William Hood, a resident of Birmingham, was born in Mississippi in 1851, and afterwards moved to Birmingham, Alabama, where he married. While a merchant he has become extensively interested as a producer in the oil fields of both Kansas and Texas. He is a democrat and a chairman of the board of directors and board of stewards in his Methodist Church, and is also a member of the Masonic fraternity. William Hood married Vilanta Yielding, who was born in Alabama. Their children are: William Alexander; Ira, a merchant at Birmingham; Robert H., associated with his brother Ira at Birmingham; Nina, wife of G. T. Brazelton, who is in the real estate business at Birmingham; Walter H., a graduate with the degree LL. B. from Washington and Lee University and now a...

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Native American History of Lee County, Alabama

Although most Alabamans today probably assume that the Creek Indians are an ancient, indigenous ethnic group, that once occupied all or most of their state, the Creek Tribe, in fact, is a political entity that is not much older than Alabama itself. The ethnic label “Creek” does not even appear on maps until 1745. Until after the American Revolution, maps described locations of specifically named ethnic groups within the geographical regions denote as “Creek.”  The word “Muscogee” – which nowadays is considered synonymous with “Creek” – does not appear on any maps until late in the 18th Century. Location and Geography Lee County is located in east central Alabama, northeast of Phoenix City, AL and Columbus, GA.  In 1832 the Treaty of Cusseta transferred the lands of the Creek Confederacy to the United States.  This territory included what is now Lee County.  In 1866, it was created from Russell, Chambers, Macon and Tallapoosa Counties and named after General Robert E. Lee.  Immediately to the east is Russell County and to the north is Chambers County. Tallapoosa adjoins on short segment of the northeastern section of Lee. Macon County adjoins on the southwest. The eastern boundary of Lee is the Chattahoochee River and Georgia state line. The northern part of the county forms the southern tip of the Piedmont geological zone that is generally known by geologists as the Fall...

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Muskogee Indians

Muskogee. Meaning unknown, but perhaps originally from Shawnee and having reference to swampy ground. To this tribe the name Creeks was ordinarily applied. Also called: Ani’-Gu’sa, by the Cherokee, meaning “Coosa people,” after an ancient and famous town on Coosa River. Ku-û’sha, by the Wyandot. Ochesee, by the Hitchiti. Sko’-ki han-ya, by the Biloxi. Muskogee Connections. The Muskogee language constitutes one division of the Muskhogean tongues proper, that which I call Northern. Muskogee Location. From the earliest times of which we have any record these people seem to have had towns all the way from the Atlantic coast of Georgia and the neighborhood of Savannah River to central Alabama. (See also Florida, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas.) Muskogee Villages It is difficult to separate major divisions of the Muskogee from towns and towns from villages, but there were certainly several distinct Muskogee tribes at a very early period. The following subdivisional classification is perhaps as good as any: Abihka (in St. Clair, Calhoun, and Talladega Counties): Abihka-in-the-west, a late branch of Abihka in the western part of the Creek Nation, Okla. Abihkutci, on Tallassee Hatchee Creek, Talladega County, on the right bank 5 miles from Coosa River. Kan-tcati, on or near Chocolocko, or Choccolocco, Creek and probably not far from the present “Conchardee.” Kayomalgi, possibly settled by Shawnee or Chickasaw, probably near Sylacauga, Talladega County. Lun-ham-ga, location unknown. Talladega,...

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Lee County, Alabama Census Records

  1860 Lee County, Alabama Census Free 1860 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1860 Lee County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1860 U.S. Census Guide 1870 Lee County, Alabama Census Free 1870 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1870 Lee County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1870 U.S. Census Guide 1880 Lee County, Alabama Census Free 1880 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1880 Lee County, Census (images and index) 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1880 U.S. Census Guide 1890 Lee County, Alabama Census Free 1890 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1890 Veterans Schedule $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1890 U.S. Census Guide 1900 Lee County, Alabama Census Free 1900 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1900 Lee County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1900 U.S. Census Guide 1910 Lee County, Alabama Census Free 1910 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1910 Lee County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1910 U.S. Census Guide 1920 Lee County,...

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Lee County, Alabama Cemetery Records

Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Hosted at Lee County, USGenWeb Archives Project Morris Chapel Methodist Church, Lee County, Alabama Philadelphia Baptist Church Cemetery (Hood Surname – Partial) – Lee Co., Al Pitts Chapel Methodist Church Cemetery – Lee Co., Al Roxana Cemetery, Lee, Alabama Shady Grove Cemetery #1, Lee, Alabama Webb Cemetery, Lee, Alabama...

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