Location: Lecompton Kansas

Biographical Sketch of Owen A. Bassett

Owen A. Bassett was one of the ablest and most energetie actors in the Border troubles, the Civil war and the civil affairs of the Roconstruction period. A Pennsylvasian by birth, his father moved to Illinois in 1837 and two years later to Iowa. The family home was first in Lee County. The son’s original intention was to be a civil engineer, but he finally decided in favor of the law, although the stirring and compelling affairs which entered his life prevented him for many years from utilizing the legal training which he acquired. In 1855 he was employed in the United States land office at Fort Des Moines, Iowa, but in the spring of 1856 resigned to engage in business at Lecompton. Soon afterward he entered heartily into the free-state cause, joined the military company known as the Lawrence Stubbs, and was engaged both in the battle of Franklin and the capture of Fort Saunders. Subsequently he held the positions of engineer and quartermaster with the free-state army of Kansas, and in December, 1856, moved to Leavenworth. There he engaged as engineer for the Quindaro Town Company, and in 1857 and 1858 served in the Territorial Legislature. In the latter year he moved to Franklin County, published the Kansas Freeman a few months, returned to Lawrence and was admitted to the bar. At the outbreak of the Civil...

Read More

Biography of William R. Smith

One of the fine buildings bordering the State Capitol grounds at Topeka is the Kansas State Printing plant. That is the official headquarters of William R. Smith, state printer, and also secretary of the State Printing Commission and chairman of the School Book Commission of the state. Doubtless any citizen, and particularly a printer, would deem it an honor to be at the head of an establishment which experts pronounce to be the equal in mechanical equipment and operating effieiency of any commercial printing establishment in the country. When Mr. Smith went into office on July 1, 1915, he brought with him a ripe experience, including an extensive service in all the grades of the printing business, years of editorial and newspaper publishing work, and perhaps best of all an inheritance and training in the progressive Kansas spirit. When the advancement of the welfare of the state is concerned, W. R. Smith can always be found in the ranks of the workers and usually among the leaders. The influence for good he has exercised as an editor in various sections of the state can hardly be overestimated. While his life has been distinctive in more than one particular, he is in every sense a typical Kansan. He was born at the old land office and capital, Lecompton, March 21, 1872. His grandparents, William L. and America C. (Barton) Smith...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Albert G. Patrick

Albert G. Patrick, of Jefferson and Calhoun counties, Kansas, was one of the free-state leaders and, although he finally died full of years and honor, had a most narrow escape from death in the most exciting period of the border troubles. He was an Indiana native, born at Salem, Washington County, in 1824, and a settler at Leavenworth, February 18, 1856. He wrote an account of the robbery and stuffing of the ballot box in the Currler-Beck contest for a seat in the Council, which was published in an Indiana paper and aroused the men of the town. In the summer of 1856 he was taken prisoner by his enemies and delivered to Captain Miller, who took him to Lecompton. There he was court-martialed and ordered to be shot as a spy; was taken out to an open prairie and placed before twelve picked markamen. Realizing his extremity, he tried the virtue of the Masonie sign of distress; it was successful, and two days later he was delivered to Governor Woodson, at Lecompton, where he was placed under guard with five or six other political prisouers. Finally he was set at liberty and proceeded to Lawrence. He joined Captain Wright’s Stranger Creek Company and participated in the Hickory Point engagement; with others, he was eaptured by United States troops and sent to Lecompton, where he was held by Governor...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of George W. Martin

George W. Martin, long secretary of the State Historical Society, an old newspaper man and state printer, was born in Blair County, Pennsylvania, June 30, 1841. He learned the printer’s trade in his native town and in Philadelphia, and in April, 1857, accompanied his parents to the Territory of Kansas, Young Martin worked in printing offices at Lecompton until the fall of 1859 and in 1861 became connected with the Junction City Union, which he edited for several years. Mr. Martin was postmaster at Junction City several months in 1865 and register of the land office in 1865-66; assessor of internal revenue in 1867-68; register of the land office a second term; state printer in 1873-81; member of the Kansas House of Representatives in 1883, and mayor of Junction City in 1883-85. He moved to Kansas City, Kansas, in July, 1888, where he published the Gazette until December, 1899, when he was elected secretary of the State Historical Society, which he held at the time of his...

Read More

Biography of Thomas E. Trigg

Thomas E. Trigg. “A map of busy life” mused the poet Cowper more than a hundred years ago, over his newspaper. The description yet holds good, a century of existence only having widened its field and strengthened its power. With its modern perfected machinery for the garnering of news, and with its vivid portrayal of the world’s happenings, it is, indeed, a map of swiftly passing events, one that had become a necessary vitalizing element and an indispensable factor of every day living. How surely the development of a newspaper in a community marks the latter’s progress. A name well known in journalism in Kansas, is that of Trigg, and a worthy bearer of this honored name is found in the owner and proprietor of the Elgin Journal, Thomas E. Trigg, who had been identified with newspaper work for more than a quarter of a century. Thomas E. Trigg was born at Albia, Iowa, September 15, 1862. His parents were William Allen and Mary Elizabeth (Ware) Trigg, the latter of whom died at Garnett, Kansas, in 1901. The paternal grandfather, Thomas E. Trigg, was born in Virginia, of remote Irish ancestry, in 1809, and died in Linn County, Kansas, in 1891. His people had been early and substantial settlers in Kentucky, and Trigg County, in that state, commemorates their importance. Prior to the Civil war, Thomas E. Trigg was...

Read More

Biography of Cassius T. Neihart

Cassius T. Neihart. Banker, mayor, lawyer, land owner at Lyndon, Cassius T. Neihart enjoys a position of unusual prominence and influence in Osage County, and had been a resident of Kansas since 1878, being brought to the state in early childhood. It was an emigrant wagon that brought him and his parents to Kansas when he was in his fourth year. He was born near Coal City, Indiana, on a farm February 13, 1875. William Neihart, his father, of German descent, was married in Indiana to Melissa Reynolds. During part of his life in Indiana William Neihart taught school. He first came to Kansas in 1877. Having been a resident in the coal districts of Indiana, he naturally sought a similar location in Kansas. The locality in and about Carbondale especially pleased him, and in 1878 he brought his family and established a permanent home in Osage County. Having a practical knowledge of the coal industry, he leased some properties and began “stripping” the land with an ox team. Later his enterprise developed until he employed a large number of men and extensive capital. In 1882 he bought a farm near Carbondale, but was never a farmer by regular vocation. In 1888 he went to Old Mexico, and there was employed on irrigation projects in the State of Oaxaca under the auspices of the Mexican Government. A few years...

Read More

Biography of Benjamin E. Lewis

Benjamin E. Lewis. It is invariably found in tracing the influences which make for good citizenship, integrity and morality that the fundamental of these qualities lies in education. Therein is found the basis of intelligence, of judgment according to the value, of comprehension, and, equipped with these, youth may enter upon the struggle of life well prepared to fight its battles. Southeastern Kansas had no reason to feel ashamed of its educational system, or of the men who direct it. The individuals chosen to manage and to discipline have been carefully selected, and in their ranks are found men of broad and comprehensive learning, who have had their training in some of the most distinguished educational institutions in the country. In this latter class is found Prof. Benjamin E. Lewis, superintendent of city schools of Iola, Kansas, and a man who had devoted his life to the educational profession. Benjamin E. Lewis, was born at Lecompton, Douglas County, Kansas, April 10, 1869, and is a son of Dr. P. M. and Martha Jane (Baird) Lewis. The family to which he belongs originated in Wales, from which country, during Colonial times, it emigrated to America, the early members settling in New Jersey and Pennsylvania and their descendants becoming pioneers of North Carolina and Tennessee. It was in the latter state, in 1809, that the grandfather of Professor Lewis, Ephraim Lewis,...

Read More

Biography of Charles B. Lines

Charles B. Lines was born in New Haven, Connecticut, March 12, 1807, was a self-educated and self-made man, having never attended school and was thrown on his own responsibility when a boy. He started out to be a sailor but gave it up and entered the cabinet business when thirteen years of age. He had told his grandsons how his boss would come around and tell him to push his planes faster. Although he was quite successful in business he took time for public affairs. While in the cabinet and undertaking business he placed Noah Webster in his coffin, also Jonathan Trumbull, secretary of General Washington. He was one of nineteen young men to join the first temperance society in Connecticut, was a forceful speaker on temperance, religion and politics, having filled the pulpit and traveled over the country, until some writers added Reverend to his name. While a member of the whig party he was elected to the Connecticut Legislature in 1853, was chairman of the committee on finance and also a member of the committee on banks and committee on sale of spirituous liquors, was a presidential elector and took the electoral vote to Washington. He made the acquaintance of President Pierce, J. Q. Adams, Clay, Webster and Jackson. He married Maria Wooding July 18, 1829. Today the houses are built so the women will have no...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest