Location: Lebanon Tennessee

Biographical Sketch of Joseph Martin Lynch

(See Grant and Adair)-Joseph Martin Lynch, born July 30, 1881, educated in Male Seminary and Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tennessee, graduating from the Law Department of the latter, but refused to take the Tennessee bar examination because Negroes were included in the class. Elected Register of Deeds of Adair County, September 17, 1807. He married Hazel Capitola Mason. He served for several years as attorney for the Interior Department and on November 8, 1919, refused the appointment of Register of the United States Treasury, because it would be impossible for him to take his aged father from his home and friends and he would not leave him. Mr. Lynch’s great-great-grandfather, Joseph Martin, a native of Albermarle County, Virginia, was elected Major in the Revolutionary Army, February 17, 1779, and promoted to a Lieutenant Colonelcy in March, 1781. He was elected Brigadier General of the North Carolina militia, December 15, 1787, and was commissioned Brigadier General of the 20th Brigade of Virginia militia by Governor “Light Horse Harry” Lee on December 11, 1793. His son John Martin, was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1827, and was the first Chief Justice and first treasurer of the Cherokee Nation. Mr. Lynch’s grandfather, Joseph Martin Lynch, was a delegate from the Cherokee Nation to Washington in 1839, and was elected Senator from Delaware District August 2, 1842. Mr. Lynch’s father, Cicero Leonidas...

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Biography of Charles Baird Stark

Charles Baird Stark, one of the ablest lawyers of Missouri, whose ability is combined with a high sense of duty and professional honor, was born in Springfield, Robertson county, Tennessee, June 13, 1854. He is a son of Joseph Carter Stark, and a grandson of John Stark, who was born in Virginia and removed to Tennessee in 1812. He was a planter and was the only one of a line of Starks that was not a lawyer, back to a John Stark, who was admitted to the bar, in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1665. In the possession of Charles B. Stark, is a silver snuff-box that was owned by James Stark of Scotland, and is of a remarkably artistic design and engraving. It is inscribed with the date, 1743, and bears the family motto “Fortiorum Fortia facts,” and the insignia of a bull’s head. He also possesses ancient razors and many other heirlooms which he prizes most highly. The grandfather of General John Stark, who commanded the American forces in the Battle of Bennington in 1777, was in the direct ancestral line of Charles B. Stark. They have been a family of lawyers and military men. One of them, Jeremiah Stark, lost an arm by an Indian’s arrow in the French and Indian war. He was the father of five sons who served in the Revolutionary war. The grandfather, John...

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Biography of H.D. Foust

H. D. Foust, of Foust & Jones, carriage manufacturers at Alexandria, was born in Wilson County in 1845, a son of William E. and Betsey (Luster) Foust. The father, born in Wilson County about 1818, was the son of William Foust, a native of Germany. William E. was married in 1844, and was all his life a blacksmith and carriage manufacturer in his native county. He was sheriff of the county four terms. The mother was born in the same county about 1829, and both were members of the Missionary Baptist Church. Educated at Lebanon, our subject at fifteen entered Company A, in the Forty-fifth Tennessee Infantry, and operated in the extreme South for about eighteen months, when, under the conscription act, he was rejected on account of age. He then returned home, and soon after joined Gen Forrest’s command, and afterward Gen. Morgan’s on his Indiana and Ohio raid, but was captured on reaching the Ohio River. He was soon recaptured, and went home and south to join Gen. Wheeler at Dalton, Ga., with who he remained until his surrender at Raleigh, N. C., and then returned home. In December 1865, he married Catherine, daughter of W. A. Robinson of Lebanon, where she was born in 1844. Their six children are living: William E., Jr., Bettie, Henry D., Malinda, John L. and Etta. Mrs. Foust, died in 1880,...

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Biography of Hon. J.J. Ford

Hon. J. J. Ford, attorney at law, was born in Dekalb (then Smith) County November 22, 1822. He is one of ten children of Daniel and Mary (Fite) Ford, the former of Irish origin. The father, born about 1794 in South Carolina, was the son of Daniel Ford, Sr., of Virginia, who became one of the earliest settlers of Tennessee, when Daniel, Jr., was but a small boy. He settled in Smith County near what is now Temperance Hall, where he remained until his death. With ordinary education in his youth, Daniel, Jr., married about 1818 and spent his life in Smith and Dekalb Counties. He was an able man and served as magistrate and constable several years. He died in 1864. The mother, a native of Tennessee and of Dutch decent, died in 1836. She was a daughter of Rev. J. Fite, an early Tennessee settler from New Jersey, who spent the early years of his settlement in a cane tent on Smith Fork, and who with his brother cut a road through the cane to Nashville. He made some money by dealing in the skin and flesh of bears. He was a Baptist minister for nearly sixty years and a historic character of early Tennessee. With no educational advantages our subject began the blacksmith trade when fifteen years old, and, when of age, purchased the property of...

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Biography of Hon. John B. Robinson

Hon. John B. Robinson, attorney at law of Smithville, is a native of Dekalb County; was born in 1835. His parents were Alexander and Rachel (Barnes) Robinson. The father was of English descent, born in Cumberland County, Va., about 1804. He came to Tennessee in 1824, locating in Smith (now Dekalb) County. Two years later he settled in the Fourth District. He taught school several sessions and then married. He was surveyor of the county a number of years. He owned 150 acres of fine land at the time of his death in 1867. His wife was born in Dekalb County, in 1804. Her parents, George and Bridget Barnes, were among the pioneers, settling in the county before 1800. Mr. and Mrs. Robinson had nine children, six of whom are living, our subject being the fourth. He was educated in the common schools. There were no public schools and his parents were unable to send him to college. After he attained his majority he began teaching, which he followed for several years. The last sessions he was in Illinois. In 1855 he commenced the study of law on his own responsibility, but advising with Judge Robert Cantrell, now of Lebanon. In 1858 he was admitted to the bar. When the war broke out he became one of the boys in blue. In June 1862, he enlisted in Company I,...

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Biography of R.C. Nesmith

R. C. Nesmith, attorney at law of Smithville, was born in Dekalb County in 1837, a son of William A. and Elizabeth M. (McDowell) Nesmith. The father is of Scotch- Irish decent, born in 1799, in York District, South Carolina. In 1809 with his father, William Nesmith, immigrated to Blount County, E. Tenn. A year later they went to northern Alabama, where for a number of years they lived among the Cherokee Indians. In 1824 he came to Dekalb County, and three years later married. He settled in the Nineteenth district, where he engaged in wagon making and farming. There were but two wagons in the county when he settled there. He has lived in various portions of the county, but for past few years has made his home in Smithville. From 1859 to 1862 he was county tax collector. He is the oldest living man in the county, and until the last seven years was unusually vigorous and active. He is rather eccentric, witty and humorous. He is now quite feeble. His wife was born in Wilson County in1803, and died April, 1885. She was the mother of eleven children, of whom nine are living, our subject being the seventh. He attended the common schools but a short time. At the age of seventeen he began teaching, continuing four sessions. In 1862 he enlisted in Company G, Forty-fifth...

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Biography of Thomas Murray Pierce

Thomas Murray Pierce, a man of splendid professional qualifications and of high social standing in St. Louis, is practicing at the bar as a member of the firm of Jourdan, Rassieur & Pierce and is also vice president and general counsel of the Terminal Railway Association, of which at one time he served as president. He was born in Union City, Tennessee, July 18, 1877. His father, Rice A. Pierce. also a native of that state, is a representative of an old Tennessee family of Welsh lineage that was founded in America by Rice Pierce, who came to the new world in 1777 with a Welsh regiment for service in the Revolutionary war. He remained, however, a resident of the new world and in 1812 served with the American forces at Norfolk, Virginia, and held the rank of colonel in the army. He originally settled in North Carolina and for many generations the family lived in the south. His namesake, Rice A. Pierce, father of Thomas M. Pierce, is a prominent lawyer of Union City, Tennessee, and served as a member of congress from the ninth congressional district of that state for more than twenty years, figuring very prominently in both state and national politics. At the time of the Civil war he joined the Confederate forces under General Nathan Bedford Forrest and was on active duty throughout the period...

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Biography of Hon. Philetus Averitt

In the Weekly Capital, published in Boise, June 17, 1899, appeared the following sketch of him whose name introduces this article. “Hon. Philetus Averitt was born in Mayfield, Kentucky, thirty-one years ago. He was educated at Bethel College and Cumberland University, and practiced law in his native town for one year. Six years ago he came to St. Anthony, Idaho, and commenced the practice of his profession. In a few years he has built up a first-class practice, and is recognized as an able and painstaking member of the legal profession. In 1896 Mr. Averitt gave his splendid abilities to the organization of the Democratic party of Fremont County, and was made chairman of the county committee. By his careful and able management of the county campaign every man on the Democratic ticket was elected. “In 1898 Mr. Averitt was elected a member of the house of representatives from Fremont County, and early in the session was made the leader of the Democratic and silver-Republican majority in that body. This leadership was maintained by Mr. Averitt throughout the session, in face of strong opposition from brilliant and aspiring young men. He managed the campaign of L. C. Rice for state treasurer, nominating him in the state convention in a remarkably able speech. The magnificent results for Democracy in Fremont County at the last election are largely due to the...

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Biography of Hon. J. J. Smith

Hon. J. J. Smith, an able representative of the Miami bar, who has here practiced his profession since 1915, is specializing in criminal law, in which branch of jurisprudence he has been very successful, and he has also done effective service for the public good as a member of the state senate. He was born June 23, 1889, near Ranger, in Eastland county, Texas, upon the farm of his parents, Benjamin F. and Catherine (Simpson) Smith, the latter also a native of that section of the Lone Star state, while the former was born in Madison county, North Carolina. While residing in North Carolina the father was in the employ of the government, serving as peace and revenue, officer at Asheville and at Mars Hill. From that state he removed to Texas, where he engaged in riding the range, leading the life of a frontiersman. In 1900 he came to Oklahoma, following the occupation of farming in Greer county. He and his wife now reside upon a farm in Beckham county, this, state. His political allegiance has always been given to the democratic party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise, and he has been active in its support, while fraternally he is identified with the Masons. He is an expert marksman and is a typical frontiersman whose life has been spent upon the broad, open ranges....

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Biography of Rev. Joseph Franklin Thompson

Rev. Joseph Franklin Thompson, librarian of the Carnegie Library at Tahlequah and superannuated minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, having been retired since 1906, was born May 21, 1841, near Maysville, Arkansas, in what was then the Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory. His parents, both of whom are deceased, were James Allen and Martha (Lynch) Thompson, the former a native of South Carolina and the latter a native of Virginia and a member of an old Cherokee family there. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson were married in Georgia and came to Beattie’s Prairie in 1838, with a detachment of Cherokees under Richard Taylor, superintendent of the Cherokee Nation. The father engaged in farming and in the conduct of a mercantile establishment there, achieving more than substantial success. He died in January, 1876. His wife passed away in October, 1872. Six sons and five daughters were born to their union, Joseph Franklin, whose name initiates this review, being the youngest child. In the acquirement of an education Joseph Franklin Thompson attended the schools of the Cherokee Nation and in due time enrolled as a student in the Tahlequah Male Seminary, graduating from the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tennessee, in 1861, with the A. B. degree. After leaving school he enlisted for service in the Civil war and served as Sergeant Major for some time, receiving constant promotion until he became Lieutenant...

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Biography of Frank Lee

From the year which brought statehood to Oklahoma, Frank Lee has been a member of the Muskogee bar and is regarded as one of the strong and eminent representatives of the profession in this part of the state. He has engaged in the practice of law altogether for thirty-five years and his professional career has been marked by continuous progress and constantly developing power. Born in Stockwell, Indiana, December 9, 1864, he is a son of Captain Smith Lee, who served with the Boys in Blue in the Civil war, becoming a member of Company I, Eleventh Indiana Cavalry. After loyally aiding in the defense of the Union he filled various county offices in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, and later removed to Texas, where he conducted a fruit ranch. Frank Lee pursued his more specifically literary education in Stockwell College, near La Fayette, Indiana, and took up the study of law in Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tennessee, where he was graduated with the class of 1886. The day was indeed a Commencement Day for him the commencement of a professional career which has been characterized by thoroughness, by faithfulness to his clients’ interests and by continuous study and research, making him a strong advocate before the court and a safe counselor in regard to legal matters. He entered upon the general practice of law at Paris, Texas, and was afterward...

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Biography of Eugene Sloan Adkins

Eugene Sloan Adkins, organizer and promoter of the Adkins Hay & Feed Company of Muskogee, is also identified with other important business interests of the state, whereby he has won classification with the representative merchants of Oklahoma. His plans have always been carefully defined and promptly executed and his energy has enabled him to overcome all difficulties and obstacles in his path. Mr. Adkins was born in Choteau, Oklahoma, March 26, 1896, and is a son of Moses E. and Hattie (Sloan) Adkins. The father is deceased. Eugene S. Adkins obtained a public school education, completing a course in the high school of Muskogee, while later he attended Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tennessee, and was there graduated with the class of 1913. In 1915 he established a hay and grain business at Choteau, his native city, where he remained until 1917, when he organized the Adkins Hay & Feed Company of Muskogee, which is incorporated. In 1921 he built an elevator twenty-six and a half by twenty-seven and a half feet and one hundred and thirty-two feet in height. He also built a concrete warehouse one hundred and ten by thirty feet. The business was capitalized for seventy-five thousand dollars with Mr. Adkins as the president and manager. The volume of his trade is steadily increasing and he is one of the foremost representatives of the hay and grain...

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Biographical Sketch of G. S. Deakins

G. S. Deakins, farmer, of the Thirteenth District of Coffee County, Tennessee, was born in Marion County (now Sequatchie) Tennessee, in 1832, and is the son of William and Sarah (Richards) Deakins, natives of Tennessee. The father died in 1848 and the mother in 1836. Both were members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Reared on the farm with a common school education, he also attended Burritt College at Spencer, Tennessee, and later, Emory and Henry College of Virginia. Having entered the law school of Lebanon (Tennessee) University in 1860, the civil war caused him to enter the confederate service, in Company H, Thirty fifth Regiment of Infantry. After the war and a resident in his native county for some time, he went to Jasper, Tennessee, where he was appointed clerk and master of the Chancery Court, holding this until his resignation four years later. In 1884 he removed to Tullahoma, and after a year’s residence there began farming. In 1860 he was married to Mary, daughter of Judge Frazier of Nashville. She died in 1863. In 1874 he married Mary A., daughter of F. A. Lochmiller, a native of Tennessee. They have two children: Vernie S., born February 8, 1875, and Fredrick T., born March 26, 1886. Both our subject and wife are members of the Old School Presbyterian...

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Biographical Sketch of George W. Cross

George W. Cross, a prominent lawyer of Manchester, Tennessee, was born in Anderson County August 31, 1849. He is the son of William and Jane (Black) Cross, both of English descent and natives of Anderson County. The former, born in 1810, is still living; the latter, born about 1820, died February 26, 1885. Married in 1836 the elder Cross-engaged in farming. He is a democrat, and sympathizes with the Cumberland Presbyterian Church of which his wife was a member. Our subject, the fifth of eight children, was educated chiefly at Cumberland University, at Lebanon, Tennessee, and the military school of Knoxville, Tennessee, from which he graduated in 1874. After three years’ teaching in Decherd and Salem, Tennessee, in September 1877, he took ten months at Vanderbilt University Law Department, and the professor granted him license to practice. Since 1878, when he came to Manchester, he has become one of the most successful lawyers of Coffee County and among the ablest in this section. January 17, 1882, he married Beulah Hickerson, born in 1861, the daughter of Judge W. P. Hickerson. She was a cultured lady. Her death occurred July 24, 1885. Mr. Cross is a decided...

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Biographical Sketch of W. A. Clark

W. A. Clark, farmer of Coffee County, was born June 17, 1830, in Lebanon. His father, Joshua Clark, was born June 5, 1806, in Maryland, and came to Kentucky early and finally to Lebanon in 1828, engaging at contracting and farming until 1847, since then he has been devoted to the latter. His mother, Sarah (Allen) Clark, daughter of “Billy” Allen, of Lebanon, was born February 14, 1807, in Tennessee. Our subject is of Scotch-Irish descent. Having learned the mechanic’s trade, he left his father’s farm when nineteen and worked at his trade until 1865, since when he has been a successful farmer. June 14, 1849, he married Elizabeth S. McGinn, a native of North Carolina. Their children are Joshua, William E., Robert H. and John D. Besides dealing in general merchandise at Bradyville, he was postmaster and collecting officer there several years; the planing mill business occupied his attention for a time also. Politically, he is a democrat. His wife is a relative of Gen. Steele, of Saulsbury, N....

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