Location: Lebanon Connecticut

Cushman Family of Norwich Vermont

The Cushman family in New England dates from the year 1621, the first after the landing of the Pilgrims from the Mayflower, when Robert Cushman, who was a prominent leader and organizer of the Plymouth Colony, brought from England the earliest recruits and supplies to the wasted and famishing settlement. A century and a half later Solomon Cushman, a descendant of Robert, in the sixth generation, born at Plympton, Mass., in 1745, having married Sarah Curtis, daughter of Simeon Curtis, at Lebanon, Conn., in 1768, removed to Norwich, probably in company with the Curtis family. Solomon Cushman (afterward known as Captain Solomon) was in those days a famous hunter and marksman, the terror of bears and catamounts. He once shot and killed a deer at a distance of seventy-two rods 11166 feet. In the war of the Revolution he served three years as lieutenant in the Norwich militia in the campaign of 1777 against Burgoyne, and the following two years on the northern frontier as captain of a company of Rangers in the regiment of Colonel Timothy Bedel of Haverhill, N. H. His health was much broken as a result of his service in the army. In 1784 he removed to Tunbridge, Vt., where he died in 1799, at the age of fifty-four. His son, Benjamin H. Cushman, born in Norwich, recently died at Tunbridge, upwards of ninety years...

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Curtis Family of Norwich Vermont

Simeon Curtis came to Norwich from Lebanon, Connecticut, as early as the year 1773, in which year he was elected one of the town assessors, and located near the south line of the town, on the farm where Henry S. Goddard now lives. Mr. Curtis died in 1779 at the age of fifty-eight years, and his grave is found in the old cemetery at Norwich village among the graves of other early settlers and near that of his gifted son, Abel Curtis, who survived his father only four years. But little is now known of the Curtis family, as its last representatives seem to have disappeared from town more than half a century ago. The maiden name of Mrs. Simeon Curtis was Sarah Hutchinson, and the home of the family was at ”Lebanon Crank” as it was called, or that part of Lebanon which is now Columbia, Conn., and which was the immediate locality of Moor’s Indian Charity School founded by Doctor Eleazer Wheelock, out of which grew Dartmouth College. Captain Solomon Cushman, who came to Norwich the same year with Simeon Curtis, had married in 1768, at Lebanon Crank, Sarah Curtis, probably a daughter of Simeon Curtis. He removed to Tunbridge, Vt., in 1784, where he was preceded several years by Elias Curtis, another son of Simeon, who had previously lived in Norwich, and where two or more...

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Biography of Abel Curtis

In the abundance of able men that adorned the first twenty-five years of the history of the town, there is no more brilliant name than that of Abel Curtis. He was a son of Simeon Curtis and came with his father from Lebanon, Conn., where he was born June 13, 1755. The son graduated from Dartmouth College in the class of 1776, being the first graduate from this town, one year earlier than the Rev. Asa Burton. Abel Curtis is first mentioned in connection with town affairs in November, 1778, when he was chosen delegate to the Cornish convention of December following, in company with Peter Olcott and Nathaniel Brown. From this time until his death in 1783, a period full of important events shaping the future of state and country, he was prominent in all the transactions of the town, representative for three years in the legislature; serving on many committees; delegate to Congress in 1782, with Ira Allen and Jonas Fay; assistant judge of the county court in 1782; delegate to the Charlestown convention of January, 1781, sitting at Windsor, by the joint action of which with the legislature of Vermont, the second union of New Hampshire towns was effected on the 22nd of February, following; delegate to the Thetford convention of June 1782, by which he was commissioned agent of the towns of Hartford, Norwich, Bradford,...

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Hardships of the Early Natchez Emigrants

Taking the reader with us, to the settlements of the distant Natchez region, he will find that emigrants continued to pour in, upon those fertile hills and alluvial bottoms, from all parts of “his majesty’s Atlantic plantations.” Many were the hardships and perils they encountered, in reaching this remote and comparatively uninhabited region. It is believed that the history of one party of these emigrants will enable the reader to understand what kind of hardships and deprivations all the others were forced to undergo. Major General Phineas Lyman, a native of Durham, a graduate of Yale, a distinguished lawyer, and a member of the legislature of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, became commander of the Connecticut forces in 1755. He served with so much distinction, during the Canadian war, that he was invited, by persons high in office, to visit England. He had formed an association composed of his brothers in arms, called the “Military Adventurers,” whose design was, the colonization of a tract of country upon the Mississippi. He sailed to England, as agent for this company, with the sanguine, yet reasonable hope, that the King would make the grant. Arriving there he found, to his astonishment, that land in a wilderness was refused to those who had fought so valiantly for it, and whose contemplated establishment would have formed a barrier against enemies, who might seek to acquire...

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First Settlements in Norwich Vermont

Having glanced thus briefly at the action of the Norwich proprietors in opening a way to reach their new township in the wilderness, and in dividing up a portion of its surface into lots suitable to become the homesteads of future settlers, let us pause a moment and see what had meantime been done in the work of actual settlement. I am indebted to Rev. Edmund F. Slafter of Boston for an interesting account of what was unquestionably the first attempt at settlement made within the limits of the town. I quote from the Slafter Memorial: “Samuel Slafter [of Mansfield, Connecticut], the father of John Slafter, being an original proprietor, and being at the first meeting chosen treasurer of the corporation, took a deep interest in the settlement of the town. At his suggestion, his son John made a journey through the forests of New Hampshire in 1762, to examine the territory and report upon the advantages it might offer as a place of settlement. He found it pleasantly situated on the western banks of the Connecticut, with a good soil, but for the most part of an uneven, hilly surface. He reported it well watered, not only by the Connecticut but by several small, clear streams, and by one more important one called the Ompompanoosuc, an Indian name signifying ‘the place of very white stones’ whose waters emptied...

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Samuel Woodworth, Sr Family

3-4-6-6 Samuel Woodworth, Sr., b May 16, 1772 at Lebanon, Conn., m Lovina Babcock. He d at Otsego, Ind. in 1846. She d at Otsego, Ind. 1844. Otsego is two miles southwest of Hamilton, Ind. Both buried in North Otsego Cemetery. She b Jan. 29, 1772. Lived in Utica, N. Y.; near Tunkhannock, Pa., and Windham, Pa. 1819 near Ketchumville, N. Y. where he owned a large farm (now called the Woodworth farm) and for a time at Centre Lisle, N. Y. with his son Asahel (3-4-6-6-3). Spring 1843 went with his wife to Otsego, Steuben Co., Ind. and...

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Benjamin Woodworth, SR Family

Benjamin Woodworth, SR., b 1638, d 1728 Apr. 22. M (I) Deborah _______ Children: 3-1 Elizabeth, prob. d young. 3-2 Deborah, m Sprague. 3-3 Mary, prob. d young. M (2) Hannah ______ 3-4 Benjamin, Jr. 3-5 Ichabod. 3-6 Ebenezer, b 1691 March 12. 3-7 Amos. 3-8 Ezekiel. 3-9 Caleb. 3-10 Hannah, m _____ Walter. 3-11 Ruth, m Caleb Fitch April 4. 3-12 Judith, m Thomas Newcomb 1720 removed to Salisbury, Ct. 3-13 Margaret, m Joshua Owen, Nov. 5, 1718 3-14 Priscilla, m Amos Fuller, June 29, 1721. (Note) Elizabeth and Mary not mentioned in father’s will. (Note) Benjamin Woolworth (3) born in Scituate. In 1703 bought for 250 pounds from Phillip Smith a large tract of land in Lebanon, Ct., where many of the Scituate people settled. He moved soon after to Lebanon with his family; was admitted inhabitant Dec. 22, 1704. In deeds of lands at Lebanon he is described as Benjamin Woolworth of Little Compton, R. I. Benjamin’s (3-4) father Benjamin, is found in Lebanon, Conn. as early as 1701. Town of Lebanon, Conn. records vol. 2, page 469 says: Moses Woolworth of Norwich, Conn. to Benjamin Woolworth of Lebanon, Conn.–5 acres–in Little Compton, Bristol Co. –colony of Massachusetts Bay,–being one-third part of a fifteen acre lot which originally was Walter Woolworth’s Nov. 4, 1714. Benjamin’s farm was in the northeast part of the town. In 1714...

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