Location: Lawrence Massachusetts

Biography of William F. Wadleigh

William F. Wadleigh, a farmer of Webster, is a native of Laconia, born January 24, 1837, son of Nathaniel R. and Polly H. (Ray) Wadleigh. The father, who was a prominent farmer of Laconia, and was born in 1802, died in 1854. The mother, born March 4, 1806, died in 1870. They had eight children, namely: Mary, now deceased, who was the wife of William Barrett, of Nashua, N.H.; Eliza, deceased, who was the wife of William Thompson, of Barrington, N.H.; Isaac, who married Abbie Davis, now deceased, and lives in Ludlow, Vt.; Almira, deceased, who married James Filgate, of Laconia; Catherine, who is the widow of Amos B. Tibbetts, and lives in Barrington, N.H.; Chase, who married Mary Foss, and resides in Hastings, Minn.; William F., the subject of this article; and Horace, who married Hettie Haywood, and lives in Ludlow, Vt. At the early age of eleven years William F. Wadleigh went to Gilford, N.H., and worked out on the different farms until twenty-one years old, when he tried his fortunes in Lawrence, Mass. Here he was employed for eight years in the soap factory of L. Beach & Son. After his first marriage Mr. Wadleigh removed from Lawrence to Laconia; and four years later he entered on his present farm of five hundred acres in Webster, where he has since lived. He carries on general farming,...

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Biography of George Oliver Locke

George Oliver Locke, of Pembroke, an ex-member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, was born in South New Market, N.H., September 19, 1826, son of Simeon and Clarissa (Tash) Locke. His great-grand-father, David Locke, who was a native of Yorkshire, England, became an early settler in Rye, N.H., where he owned a good farm, and resided there until his death, which occurred at a good old age. Simeon Locke (first), grandfather of the subject of this sketch, followed farming in Epsom for a time. Later he moved to East Concord, N.H., and there spent the rest of his life. His habits of thrift and industry enabled him to acquire considerable property. In politics he voted with the Democratic party, but his retiring disposition would not permit him to take any active part in public affairs. He attended the Congregational church. At his death he was seventy-nine years old. He married Abigail Blake, a Epsom, who attained the age of seventy-three, and was the mother of nine children. Of these the third, Simeon Locke (second), was born in East Concord. He settled in South New Market, and there followed his calling of mechanic for the rest of his active period. He was an able business man as well as a good mechanic, and by making proper use of his opportunities he realized excellent financial results. He was a Democrat...

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Biography of Frank H. Chapman

Frank H. Chapman, a leading druggist of Franklin Falls, was born in Lowell, Mass., May 29, 1848, son of Eben L. Chapman, of New Market, N.H. The father, who was born in 1807, removed to Lawrence, Mass., and was there a successful grocer for forty-one years, retiring from active business in 1860. He married for his first wife a Towle, of New Market, who died leaving no children. For his second wife he married Mrs. Martha J. Hilton Hanscomb, and their children were: Frank H., the subject of this sketch; and Charles, who died at the age of six years. Frank H. Chapman received his education in the common and high schools of Lawrence, Mass. In 1864 he entered the employ of H. M. Whitney, a druggist, to learn the business, remaining there for five years. Afterward, in Brooklyn, N.Y., he was employed in the store of Emil Heydenreich & Co. for three years. In 1875 he came to Franklin Falls, and purchased the drug store of E. H. Sturtevant, whom he succeeded in the business, continuing alone until 1893, when he sold one-half interest to Charles Eddy. The store is now carried on under the style of F. H. Chapman & Co. They have a full line of drugs, medicines, etc., and have succeeded in building up a large and successful business. Mr. Chapman now leaves the entire...

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Biography of John S. Cairns

North Carolina has produced many men of genius whose lives gave rich prospects of fame and usefulness, who doubtless would have brought honor and glory to the shrine of the “Old North State;” but when life has seemed most hopeful to them, when their work has begun, as it appeared, to cast upon them the halo of success, they have been snatched away from the merited renown of this world to the rest and greater glory of the Unknown. The lamented Fuller, with his thirty ideal years of a faithful life, and the invalid Gillespie, struggling against the evils of a life-devouring disease for the calling of his muse, are illustrations of this lamentable fact-this law of Fate. It is not of one who showed talents for the work of the poet, the statesman, or the orator that I now write, but of one who had gifts which promised him a station of note in the scientific world. John S. Cairns was born February 10, 1862, at Lawrence, Massachusetts. He was of Scotch parentage. His father had left “the banks and braes” of “bonnie Scotland” for the new prosperity of America. Being an intelligent, well-read man, he and his faithful wife brought with them a large and valuable stock of Scotch ideas of work and industry. Mr. Cairns, when his son was about eight years of age, moved to...

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Biography of C. K. Merriam, M.D.

C.K. MERRIAM, M.D. – Mr. Merriam was born June 29, 1848, in Houlton, Aroostook County, Maine, being the eighth child in a family of ten children, the third and fourth being girls. His father, Lewis Merriam, when a young man, went from New Salem, Massachusetts, to Maine, in 1832, and married and settled in Houlton in 1833. He is now eighty-two years old, and is coming West this summer. The parents were poor, and lived on a farm two miles from the village. In early childhood he was taught to pick wool, quill yarn, etc., as the wool of the farm was manufactured into garments in the family mill, the motive power of which was supplied principally by his mother; and with boyish impatience he watched his father make his first pair of shoes by candle light. If a book, slate, or pocket money for a Fourth of July celebration were needed, the wild strawberry patch frequently contributed the means. If a handsled, cart or miniature mill were desired, it was found in the workshop over the woodshed after a few days’ work with the lumber and tools; while the yearly sugar camp in the maple grove furnished amusement for the boys as well as syrup for the family. The farm was sold; and the family moved about two miles to a sawmill which the father built on the...

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Biographical Sketch of A. J. Sanborn

A. J. Sanborn, master mechanic, I. & St. L. Shops, Mattoon; was born in Acton, York Co., Me., in 1826; having lost his mother when but 11 years of age, he left home, and, making his way to Boston, went on board a vessel, and was absent two years on a voyage; after coming into port, he made known to his father and family his adventures for the two years past; he served seven years on the sea, sailing as second mate on board the ship Vesta, of Boston, and the brig Yucatan, in the South American trade; at the age of 21 years, he began his trade in the Lowell Machine-Shops, at Lowell, Mass; here he remained two years; he next went to Boston and worked in the locomotive-shops of Hinckley & Drury for eighteen months; thence to Lawrence, Mass.; to the Essex shops, one year; in 1858, or 1859, he came west to East St. Louis, and took charge of the erecting department of the O. & M. R. R; in 1867, he took charge of the machinery on the Vandalia R. R., and, in 1873, he took charge of the works for the I. & St. L. R. R. at Mattoon; Mr. Sanborn is truly a self-made man; his education has been derived in the school of experience, and, whatever he undertakes to perform, he executes...

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Biography of Dr. Clark W. Sylvester

Dr. Clark W. Sylvester, one of Riverside’s wealthy and most esteemed citizens, was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, in 1850, son of Sewell and Mary J. (Foster) Sylvester, both natives of Maine. The father was an iron founder by trade, and although a hard-working man, with nothing but his daily labor to depend upon for the maintenance of his family, he was possessed with the innate sense of honor and the principles of a gentleman. He toiled assiduously and took upon himself liabilities to give a good education to his son, who, during vacations, worked respectively in a grocery, paint shop, machine shop and iron foundry, and even during his terms of study often supported himself by such work as he could find to do during spare hours. His college course he never quite finished, for at the age of twenty-one he became imbued with the conviction that the expenses attendant upon his course of studies and his graduation was more than his father, whose health had recently suffered, could bear, and that his father, in reality, was more in need of assistance than able to give it. Dr. Sylvester being a youth of studious habits and of an ambitious disposition, mastered the leading branches of study in the high schools of North and South Andover, Massachusetts, then entered the Maine State Academy, in Lewiston, Maine, after which he passed...

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Biography of Rev. Linville J. Hall

For over half a century the Rev. Linville J. Hall devoted himself to bringing spiritual consolation to the soul-weary and those fearful of the after-life, for he was blessed with unusual sweetness of spirit and tactful sympathy. At the same time he was effective in the more militant side of a minister’s duties, in condemning evil stirringly and fearlessly wherever he found it, in offering a constructive life program, and in demonstrating by his own life all his preachments. His ministerial activities carried him to many localities throughout the United States, but his last years were passed in his native city, Springfield, Massachusetts. Linville J. Hall was born in Springfield on July 8, 1822, son of John and Bathsheba S. (White) Hall, and is a direct descendant of Paragon White, the first white child born in the United States. Educated in the Springfield grammar and high schools, he wished to continue his studies in a professional field and decided on the ministry, for which he studied at the Concord Biblical Institute, Concord, New Hampshire. He was ordained minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The first years of his career were passed at Brookline, New Hampshire. He was pastor at various New England churches, including one in Lawrence, Massachusetts, and East Boston, where he remained for three years. In 1873 he went to Colorado, serving as minister in Colorado City,...

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Biography of Clifton Alvah Crocker

For three generations the name of Crocker has stood for excellence of quality and business integrity in the paper manufacturing industry of New England. Holyoke, long the chief place of the S. S. Crocker interests from the manufacturers’ point of view, and famous the world over as one of the most important points where the papermaking trade is centralized, has received additional prestige in that respect by reason of its being the scene of the Crocker operations. Of that name, long an honorable one in Massachusetts annals, is Clifton Alvah Crocker, president and one of the founders of the Crocker-McElwain Company and president and treasurer of the Chemical Paper Manufacturing Company, both Holyoke concerns, who is never thought of in a business sense apart from the paper industry in which he has played, and still is playing, so prominent a part. Up and down the Connecticut Valley and to regions far remote from the confines of that beautiful and fruitful gift of nature, have gone the products of the Crocker and associates’ paper mills, carrying the name and enhancing the enviable reputation that attach both to the goods and to the executive head of the producing concerns. Mr. Crocker also is identified with other manufacturing interests of importance and with financial and educational institutions. He is highly esteemed as a citizen of Springfield, and he served that municipality as...

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Biography of Raymond C. Harris

RAYMOND C. HARRIS – The homely qualities of loyalty to one’s employers, and steady, even-minded performance of duties year in and year out, a keen desire to be of service and useful in the position assigned them by birth and circumstances with no after thought but a cheerful and confident prospect into the future, these very simple yet not all too frequent traits of character which have sped on many good men slowly but surely-like the sailing vessel drives before the calm trade winds-to the desired goal, have also helped Raymond C. Harris, president of the Textile Roll and Supply Company, to attain his present position. Mr. Harris is a native of Lawrence, Massachusetts, born November 24, 1884, a son of William O. Harris, treasurer of the Rodney Hunt Manufacturing Company, and of Elizabeth (Genmell) Harris, who died March 30, 1924, at the age of ninety-seven years. Mr. Harris came to Orange in March, 1906, from Malden, Massachusetts, and received his education in the schools of Malden and Boston. After completing his studies he entered the employ of the Rodney Hunt Manufacturing Company, of which his father was, treasurer. Gradually he rose to the position of secretary of that concern and continued with them for seventeen years, having in addition charge of the Boston office. In May, 1919, Mr. Harris established the Textile Roll and Supply Company at Orange,...

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