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Location: Lawrence County MO

Biography of Henry Fullbright

This is one of the most remarkable and worthy families of Boone County, Arkansas, and about the year 1700 the family tree first took root on American soil. The original founder of the family came to America from Holland, made a settlement in Pennsylvania, and was the great-grandfather of the present generation. John Fullbright, his son, is thought to have been born in the Keystone State and in all probability was a soldier of the Revolution. In 1815 he came west to Missouri from the Old North State, the journey thither being made by wagon, the larger portion of the Fullbright family coming at the same time. Here he and his wife died a short time after their arrival. Mrs. Fullbright’s maiden name was Elizabeth Coulter, and to them five sons and five daughters were given, all of whom had reached maturity before leaving the East: William, who died In Springfield, Missouri, in 1842; Martin, who died in Texas; Daniel, who died in Laclede County, Missouri; John, whe also died in Laclede County; Judge David reared a family of nineteen children and died in Texas; Christina (Gooden); Kittie (Evans); Elizabeth (Williams); Sallie (Smythers), and Susan (Daniels). John Fullbright and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Their son William, well known as ” Uncle Billy,” married Ruth Hollingsworth and moved to Missouri, thence to Tennessee, and in...

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Biography of F. M. Richards

F. M. RICHARDS. The calling of the merchant is one of the utmost importance in any community, and one of its most successful followers at Rome, Douglas County, Missouri, is F. M. Richards, who has been a resident of the county since 1867. He was born in Monroe County, Tennessee, March 31, 1836, a son of Frederick and Elizebeth (Renfro) Richards. the former of whom was born in Kentucky, a son of John Richards. Mrs. Richards was also born on Blue Grass soil and was a daughter of William Renfro. The subject of this sketch was but two years old when he was left fatherless, and was but fourteen years of age when his mother died. He was one of five sons and three daughters: Samuel, John, Halloway, Peter, F. M., Mallissa, Margaret and Martha. Halloway and the subject of this sketch were soldiers of the Civil War. The latter came to Missouri in 1856, while still unmarried and engaged in farming in the vicinity of Springfield, in Greene County, and there lie was married after a time to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of John and Barthena Nablett, who died in Arkansas and Greene County, Missouri, respectively. When the war opened the subject of this sketch enlisted in the Twenty-fourth Missouri Infantry, and served three months in the Home Guards, after which he was for three years in the regular...

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Biography of Dr. Lafayette Henson

DR. LAFAYETTE HENSON. Dr. Henson is still in the dawn of the success which has attended his efforts in a professional way, but has already given abundant evidence of the ability which qualifies him for a high place in the medical profession. He is a true son of Missouri and of Stone County, his birth occurring in the western part of this county October 6, 1858. The progenitor of this family in America was Peter Henson, who settled in Tennessee at an early date, and where his ancestors resided for a number of generations. Thomas Henson, the grandfather of our subject, was born in that State and was there married. Later he moved to Illinois and made his home there until 1835, when he moved to the wilds of Stone County, Missouri He followed farming to some extent, but was a minister of the Hard Shell Baptist Church for many years, and was well known all over southwest Missouri. He and wife reared a large family and some members are still living in Barry County, Mo, and are quite aged people. The grandparents settled on Flat Creek, within a mile of the Barry County line, and took up Government land. Zachariah Henson, the father of our subject, was born in Tennessee in 1814, and was but a child when his parents moved to Illinois. When he was twenty-one years...

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Biography of Washington M. Wade

WASHINGTON M. WADE. Washington M. Wade, ex-clerk and recorder of Christian County, and a prominent banker of the county, was born in Carroll County, Arkansas, January 21, 1858, and was the youngest of ten children born to the union of Joseph and Nancy (Sivley) Wade. The father was born in Warren County, Kentucky, near Bowling Green, March 4, 1814, and the mother was born in Lawrence County, Ala., in 1816. The latter was the daughter of Mr. and Rachel Sivley, and was the only one of the family to come to Missouri. Our subject’s paternal grandparents were Joseph Wade and his wife, formerly Miss Mounts. The father of our subject came from Alabama to Greene County, Missouri, in 1840, but subsequently moved to Arkansas, where he made his home until 1861. He then moved to Rolla, Missouri, for being a strong Union man his ideas did not accord with his neighbors’, and he thought it prudent to leave. He enlisted in the army, but was rejected on account of his age. His wife took the family and located in the northeast part of Christian County, but after residing there one year, moved to Grand Prairie, in Greene County, north of Republic. In 1866 the family moved to the southwest point of Christian County, Galloway Township, near Highlandville, and there resided until the death of the father, on the 29th...

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Biography of J. S. Cowdrey

Among the representative business men of Yellville, Arkansas, none hold a more prominent place than J. S. Cowdrey, whose high reputation and material prosperity came as the reward of unusual natural abilities, industriously applied. The establishment which he now owns has a good share of patronage and support, and his trade is increasing in a very flattering manner. He was born in this county July 15, 1846, a son of Dr. J. M. and Agnes (McCubbin) Cowdrey, who were among the early pioneers of this section of the country. Dr. James M. Cowdrey, the father, was born in South Carolina in 1795, and there the early years of his life were spent, but about 1825 he emigrated to Arkansas, and after a short residence in Izard and Washington Counties, came to Marion County, and here died in 1866, aged seventy-one years. He studied medicine in some of the old colleges of the East, and was a graduate, being the first one to build up a practice in northern Arkansas. He followed a general practice, became eminent, and his name was almost a household word. He was surgeon of the Fourteenth Regiment of Arkansas Infantry, C. S. A., and passed through much experience during the war-experience so trying to the constitution that it undoubtedly shortened his days. He first located at Batesville on coming to Arkansas, but later settled in...

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Biography of J. Frank Seaman

J. FRANK SEAMAN. Among the reputable men of Galena who have made their home in Stone County since 1865, is J. Frank Seaman, whose birth occurred at Carrollton, Carroll County, Arkansas, October 1, 1847. His father, Hon. John F. Seaman, was born in Saratoga County, New York, in 1812, and was of Scotch origin. He remained in his native county until grown, and then became a driver on the Erie Canal. Following this, he became a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in 1834 emigrated to Michigan, where he resided two years. In 1836 he was appointed a missionary to the Cherokee Indians, and was in their nation for two years, after which he was transferred to the Arkansas conference. After a little he gave up his ministerial duties and began the study of medicine under Dr. Forest, of Huntsville, Madison County, Arkansas. Up to 1844 or 1845 he practiced medicine, and then engaged in merchandising at Carrollton. While there, he married Miss Sophia E. Kenner, August 18, 1846, and there remained until 1862, when, on account of his Union sentiments, it became unpleasant for him and he moved to Lawrence County, Missouri. There he resumed the practice of medicine and also tilled the soil until 1869, when he again embarked in merchandising, following this at Marionville, Missouri, until his death, which occurred suddenly, on March 27, 1870....

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Biographical Sketch of George Napper

GEORGE NAPPER. Many of the residents of Christian County, Missouri, are of British birth and have engrafted upon western ways the habits of the sturdy Saxon race. George Napper was born in England about fifty-nine years ago, and when young learned the blacksmith’s trade, following the same for about thirty-two years. For some years he was in the service of the British Government, but about 1870 he came to the United States and for about three years resided at Rock, Wisconsin, where he worked at his trade. Thence he moved to Christian County, Missouri, and located north of Billings, where he resided for two years, when he moved two and a half miles southeast of that town and made his home there until a few years ago, when he removed to Verona. His farm of 400 acres, near Billings, is one of the best improved tracts in southwest Missouri and on it is a good dwelling. Everything about the place indicates that an experienced hand is at the helm, for the house and farm are in the best of order. Mr. Napper also owns considerable real estate at Billings and more at Verona. He is a thoroughgoing, active business man, and, although he came to this country with very little capital, by industry and good management he has become one of the substantial men of the county. He was...

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Biography of Capt. George W. Moore

Among the many prominent eastern families who at an early day migrated westward with a view to bettering their fortunes was the Moore family, an honored and respected member of whom, now residing in Stone County, is the subject of this sketch. His father, James M. Moore, was born in North Carolina May 13, 1811, and when about five years of age moved with his parents to Tennessee; where they remained until 1829. There James M. grew to mature years and married Miss Rachel W. Patton, a native of Tennessee, born in 1817, and the daughter of John and Sarah Patton, both Tennessee people, who came to Missouri as early as 1830, or near that time, settling in Lawrence County, where they passed the remainder of their days. In 1829 James M. Moore moved to Lawrence County, Missouri, and there remained for thirty-six years, becoming, one of its respected and highly-esteemed citizens. In 1861 he moved to Stone County and made his home here until his death, which occurred in Jefferson City, March 5, 1873, while a member of the Twenty-sixth General Assembly. Previous to the war he was a Democrat in politics, but during that eventful period he became a Republican, and ever after remained a stanch supporter of that party. In 1862 he was made captain of a company in the Enrolled Missouri Militia and served in...

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Biography of Sigel Henson

SIGEL HENSON. This gentleman, who is a prominent merchant at Cape Fair, is a descendant of one of the early pioneer families of Stone County, his parents, Zachariah and Armala (Williams) Henson, having settled on Flat Creek, this county, in 1835. He is a product of this county, born August 20, 1861, but just ten days after the battle of Wilson Creek, and the youngest in an old-fashioned family of twelve children. His youthful days were passed in attending school (taught in the old Jones’ schoolhouse of his district) and assisting on the farm. When sixteen years of age he was left an orphan, his parents both dying the same year, the father in June and the mother in August, 1877. For some time after this he did not attend school, but later he entered Marionville College, where he attended one term, working his own way through the school. Afterward he began clerking in Marionville, where he continued as clerk in the store about six years, then entered a partnership with Mr. David, firm name being Henson & David, which firm remained in business for two years. When Aurora began to build up he sold out, expecting to start in business there, but he gave that up and took a position in that town, remaining there until the death of his wife. He was married October 23, 1888, to...

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Biography of J. R. B. Moore

J. R. B. MOORE. Within years of recent date the remarkable growth of the real estate business has given it a prominence and placed it in a position that is attained by very few other elements in this country. This increase and promotion can be nothing less than a reflex of the progress and prosperity of every general interest in the community, and constitutes strong reason for gratification among all observant and appreciative business men. J. R. B. Moore has an excellent knowledge of real estate, as well as the general routine work of a real estate agent, and has been a potent contributor to the growth of his section. He was born near Mt. Vernon, Lawrence County, Missouri, August 15, 1858, a son of Isaac R. and Mary A. (Genoe) Moore, who were born in Meigs County, Tennessee, and were married there in 1857, after which they moved to Lawrence County, Missouri, and in 1866 to what is now Boone County, Arkansas, locating near the present flourishing town of Harrison. He is now residing in Heber and holds the office of justice of the peace in his township. His wife died in February, 1893, when sixty-one years of age, and he is now in his sixty-fourth year. He has served in the capacity of deputy sheriff of Boone County, during the Civil War was in the Confederate service...

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Biography of Judge Alfred Perry Couch

JUDGE ALFRED PERRY COUCH. The gentleman whose name heads this sketch has always been a potential element in the growth and development of Oregon County, Missouri, and as a representative citizen stands second to none in the county. He was born in what is now known as Couch, in Oregon County, Missouri, November 28, 1842, and is the son of Simpson and Rebecca (Roberts) Couch. It is thought that the father came originally from Virginia, but the family lived in North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky and Illinois, and long years ago, in the thirties, came to Fulton County, Arkansas Soon after this family moved to what is now Oregon County, Missouri, and made the journey in a truck wagon, with wheels sawed from the end of a log, and oxen for motive power. On coming to Missouri the family located on Town Fork of Frederick River, and here the grandfather of our subject put up a little store that gave the creek the name of Town Fork. The grandfather, Lindley Couch, afterward went to Dade County and located in Rock Prairie, where he died soon after the war, when sixty years of age. All his life his principal occupation had been farming, although he had been engaged in other enterprises. The father of Judge Couch was not yet grown when he came to the wilds of Missouri, and...

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Biography of Thomas C. Wade

THOMAS C. WADE. This wide-awake, energetic and capable county official is a native of Lawrence County, Missouri, where he was born September 26, 1853, his parents, Joseph and Nancy (Sivley) Wade, having been born in Kentucky March 4, 1814, and Lawrence County, Ala., April 11, 1816, respectively. The paternal grandfather, William Wade, was also a Kentuckian. He was a soldier of the Revolution, and was also with Gen. Jackson at New Orleans. He was an early emigrant to Texas, where he died soon after the close of the Civil War. The early days of Joseph Wade were spent in his native State, but he was married and lived in Alabama for a few years. In 1852 he removed to Missouri and settled in Lawrence County; thence to Carroll County, Arkansas, and a few years later took up his residence in Webster County, Missouri, finally settling in Greene County, fourteen miles west of Springfield, on Grand Prairie. His last move was to Christian County, where he died January 19, 1888. He made farming his life occupation, at which he secured a competency, for he was industrious and thrifty in all his ways, and he became well known and highly respected throughout southwest Missouri. Politically he was a Republican, socially a member of the A. F. & A. M., and in religion was a Methodist, of which church he was long...

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Biography of Richard Piles

RICHARD PILES. Nothing is more true than the statement that in this country alone, of all countries upon the face of the earth, a man’s family connections do not assist him to places of honor and trust in politics, but he must win his way by his own exertions, or by his own honest merit. This Government of the people is no discriminator of persons, but opens its doors wide for the entrance of all such as possess the requisite qualifications. It is very true that Richard Piles, as every other man whose father was a good and worthy citizen, must acknowledge a debt of obligation for wise counsels, watchful care and solicitude and intelligent supervision of his education, but in the great arena of public life he has had, just as every other successful person, to wrestle alone and unaided. Mr. Piles, now the popular collector of Reynolds County, Missouri, was born in that county, October 10, 1850, to the union of Thomas and Louise J. (Odell) Piles, natives of Illinois and Tennessee. The grandfather, Richard Piles, was one of the first white men to locate in Illinois, going there with the Government surveyors and hunting and cooking for them. He located there with the Indians, but when the game began to get scarce he came to Missouri, where he could follow his favorite pastime-hunting. This was in...

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Biography of William A. Caldwell

The history of pioneer life has long rivaled in interest the tales of battles and of life on the tented field. Without the roar of cannon and musketry or the inspiring notes of fife and drum, hosts no less brave and determined have gone forth into the wilderness to reclaim it for the purposes of civilization and have fought the hard battle of conquering the raw land, the sturdy forest and the rocky fastnesses of the earth, making each yield of its treasures such elements as can be utilized for man. This is an arduous labor and one to which is due recognition and commendation, and therefore in preparing a history of Idaho it is with pleasure that we introduce the life records of such worthy pioneers as William A. Caldwell, whose identification with the state antedates the formation of its territorial government. He was born in Newford, New York, December 10, 1832, and is of Scotch lineage. His grandfather, William Caldwell, having emigrated from Scotland before the Revolution, settled first in New Jersey and later removed to Orange County, New York. By occupation he was an agriculturist, and in connection with general farming he conducted a dairy. He married Miss Maria Anderson, also a native of Scotland, and they became the parents of eight children, of whom Mr. Caldwell of this review is now the only male survivor....

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Biography of Charles F. Armstrong

For many years Charles F. Armstrong has been farming in the vicinity of Coodys Bluff and is readily conceded to be one of the progressive farmers and stockmen in this section of the state. A native of Oklahoma, he was born at one of the first post office stations in Indian Territory, at that time known as Cooscoowie district, on the 27th of February, 1872. His father, Henry Armtrong, a pioneer citizen and registered Delaware, was a son-in-law of Chief Journeycake. For thirty years he was engaged in the mercantile business at Coodys Bluff and Nowata. He suffered a severe loss by fire, but rebuilding, he continued in business for another ten years, at the end of which time he disposed of the business and located on his farm. He is now, however, living retired in Coffeyville, Kansas, at the age of seventy-six years. While a resident of Nowata county, Mr. Armstrong took an active and prominent part in territorial politics and was the first postmaster at Coodys Bluff. In his family were six children: Albert F., who is living one and one-half miles east of Charles F., and whose sketch appears, elsewhere in this work; Lena, Anna, Rosalie and V. Violet; and Charles F. Charles F. Armstrong received his early education in the common schools of Coodys Bluff and subsequently attended Pierce City College in Missouri, and Gem...

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