Location: Lauderdale County AL

The Spaniards in Alabama and Mississippi

England, having lost her West Florida provinces by the victories of Galvez, and having the American Whigs, as well as the natives of France, Spain and Holland, arrayed against her, was finally forced to retire from the unequal contest. A preliminary treaty of peace was signed at Paris. England there acknowledged our independence, and admitted our southern boundary to be as follows: A line beginning at the Mississippi, at 31° north of the equator, and extending due east to the Chattahoochie River; down that river to the mouth of the Flint, and thence to the St. Mary’s, and along that river to the sea. Great Britain also expressly stipulated, in that treaty, our right to the navigation of the Mississippi River, from its mouth to its source. Jan. 20 1783: Great Britain and Spain entered into a treaty. The former warranted and confirmed to the latter the province of West Florida, and ceded to her East Florida. 1American State Papers, Boston edition, vol. 10, p. 132. But although England, by the treaty of 1782, assigned to the United States all the territory between the Mississippi and the Chattahoochie, lying between the parallels of latitude 31° and 32° 28′, embracing the same portion of the territory of Alabama and Mississippi, which lay in the British province of West Florida, yet it was not surrendered to us by Spain for years...

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Slave Narrative of Jenny Greer

Person Interviewed: Jenny Greer Location: Nashville, Tennessee Place of Birth: Florence, Alabama Age: 84 Place of Residence: 706 Overton Street, Nashville, Tennessee “Am 84 y’ars ole en wuz bawn in Florence, Alabama, ’bout seben miles fum town. Wuz bawn on de Collier plantashun en Marster en Missis wuz James en Jeanette Collier. Mah daddy en mammy wuz named Nelson en Jane Collier. I wuz named atter one ob mah Missis’ daughters. Our family wuz neber sold er divided.” “I’se bin ma’ied once. Ma’ied Neeley Greer. Thank de Lawd I aint got no chilluns. Chilluns ez so bad now I can’t stand dem ter save mah life.” “Useter go ter de bap’isin’s en dey would start shoutin’ en singin’ w’en we lef’ de chuch. Went ter deze bap’isin’s in Alabama, Memphis, en ‘yer in Nashville. Lawdy hab mercy, how we useter sing. Only song I members ez ‘De Ole Time ‘ligion.’ I useter go ter camp meetin’s. Eve’rbody had a jolly time, preachin’, shoutin’ en eatin’ good things.” “We didn’t git a thing w’en we wuz freed. W’en dey said we wuz free mah people had ter look out fer demselves.” “Don’ member now ’bout K.K.K. er ‘structshun days. Mah mammy useter tell us a lot ob stories but I’se fergot dem. I’se neber voted en dunno ob any frens bein’ in office.” “No mam, no mam, don’t b’leeve in...

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Slave Narrative of Tom W. Woods

Person Interviewed: Tom W. Woods Location: Alderson, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Florence, Alabama Age: 83 Lady, if de nigger hadn’t been set free dis country wouldn’t ever been what it is now! Poor white folks wouldn’t never had a chance. De slave holders had most of de money and de land and dey wouldn’t let de poor white folks have a chance to own any land or anything else to speak of. Dese white folks wasn’t much better off dan we was. Dey had to work hard and dey had to worry ’bout food, clothes and shelter and we didn’t. Lots of slave owners wouldn’t allow den on deir farms among deir slaves without orders from de overseer. I don’t know why, unless he was afraid dey would stir up discontent among de niggers. Dere was lots of “underground railroading” and I rekon dat was what Old Master and others was afraid of. Us darkies was taught dat poor white folks didn’t amount to much, Course we knowed dey was white and we was black and dey was to be respected for dat, but dat was about all. White folks as well as niggers profited by Emancipation. Lincoln was a friend to all poor white folks as well as black ones and if he could a’ lived things would a’been different for ever’body. Dis has been a good old...

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Biography of John Stone

JOHN STONE. Among the prominent farmers and stockraisers of Sugar Loaf Township, Boone County, Arkansas, stands the name of John Stone, whose fine farm and surroundings show what perseverance and industry will accomplish. Mr. Stone was born in Lauderdale County, Ala., in the year 1829, to the marriage of Noble and Mary (Simmons) Stone, natives of the Palmetto State. When both father and mother were children they went with their par-ents to Alabama, grew to mature years in that State, married, and when our subject was about six months old they removed to Marion County, Tennessee There the mother died in 1850. She was a worthy member of the Methodist Church. Mr. Stone selected Miss Nancy Crow as his second wife, and about 1861 they came to what is now Boone County, Arkansas, where the father passed the remainder of his days, dying in 1863, when over sixty years of age. Farming had been his life’s occupation. In religion he was a Baptist. His father, Solomon Stone, was a Revolutionary soldier. The latter was of Irish origin and probably a native of South Carolina. He moved from that State to Alabama, thence to Tennessee, where he followed farming until his death in 1839, when quite aged. He was a wealthy slave owner and an influential citizen. Our subject’s maternal grandfather was also a native of South Carolina and moved...

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Slave Narrative of Spencer Barnett

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Spencer Barnett (blind) Location: Holly Grove, Arkansas Age: 81 Occupation: Brakeman on freight train, Farmed, Worked in timber, He sold “shuck mats” and “bottomed” chairs “I was born April 30, 1856. It was wrote in a old Bible. I am 81 years old. I was born 3 miles from Florence, Alabama. The folks owned us was Nancy and Mars Tom Williams. To my recollection they had John, William, and Tom, boys; Jane, Ann, Lucy, and Emma, girls. In my family there was 13 children. My parents name Harry and Harriett Barnett. “Mars Tom Williams had a tanning yard. He bought hides this way: When a fellow bring hides he would tan em then give him back half what he brought. Then he work up the rest in shoes, harness, whoops, saddles and sell them. The man all worked wid him and he had a farm. He raised corn, cotton, wheat, and oats. “That slavery was bad. Mars Tom Williams wasn’t cruel. He never broke the skin. When the horn blowed they better be in place. They used a twisted cowhide whoop. It was wet and tied, then it mortally would hurt. One thing you had to be in your place day and night. It was confinin’. “Sunday was visiting day. “One man come to dinner, he hit a horse wid a rock and...

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Biography of Milton Gooddell Young

Well known and prominent in the financial circles of Muskogee is Milton Gooddell Young, who is the President of the Security State Bank. Long experience has well qualified him for the important and responsible duties which devolve upon him in this connection and as the years have passed he has made himself a forceful factor among the bankers of his section of the state. He was born in Florence, Alabama, February 15, 1884, and is a son of Andrew M. and Ollie (House) Young.  His father was also prominent in financial circles, being the first bank commissioner of the state of Oklahoma. Milton G. Young largely acquired his education in the public schools and when fifteen years of age started out in the business world, becoming associated with his father in the Bedford County Bank at Wartrace, Tennessee. He served as bookkeeper there for two years and then went to Fort Worth, Texas, where he occupied the position of auditor with the Continental Bank & Trust Company. In 1905 he arrived in Muskogee and entered the Bank of Commerce as assistant cashier. His next position was that of cashier in the Exchange National Bank and he remained with that corporation until April, 1919, when he organized the Security State Bank, of which he has since been the President. His connection with these various banking institutions has brought him a...

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Lauderdale County, Alabama Census Records

  1830 Lauderdale County, Alabama Census Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1830 Lauderdale County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at USGenWeb Archives Census Image Project 1830 Lauderdale County, Alabama Census Hosted at US-Census.org 1830 Lauderdale Co. Images Hosted at Lauderdale County, ALGenWeb 1830 Federal Census Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Lauderdale County, Alabama Census Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1840 Lauderdale County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at USGenWeb Archives Census Image Project 1840 Lauderdale County, Alabama Census Hosted at Lauderdale County, ALGenWeb 1840 Federal Census Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Lauderdale County, Alabama Census Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1850 Lauderdale County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Lauderdale County, Alabama USGenWeb Archives Project Lauderdale County, Alabama: 1850 Census Index 1850 Ag Census – Lauderdale Co., Al 1850 Census Of Lauderdale County, Alabama Hosted at Lauderdale County, ALGenWeb 1850 Agricultural Census 1850 Industrial Census 1850 Federal Census 1850 Federal Census – 1st Dist. p. 1 1850 Federal Census – 1st Dist. p. 2 1850 Federal Census – 1st Dist. p. 3 1850 Federal Census –...

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Lauderdale County, Alabama Cemetery Records

Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Hosted at Lauderdale County, USGenWeb Archives Project Antioch Cemetery, A Partial Listing, Lauderdale, Alabama Centerhill Church Of Christ Cemetery, Lauderdale, Alabama Greenview Cemetery, Lauderdale County, Alabama Surnames A – F Surnames G – L Surnames M – R Surnames S – Z Section 8 Section 9 Section B Jacksonburg Cemetery, A Partial Listing, Lauderdale, Alabama Mt Zion Church Of Christ Cemetery, Lauderdale, Alabama Shelton Cemetery, Whitehead, Lauderdale Co., AL Hosted at Lauderdale County, ALGenWeb Cemetery Wallace Cemetery Michael Cemetery Pettus Cemetery Allen Cemetery Gabriel Butler Cemetery Shiloh Church of Christ Cemetery Center Hill Church of Christ Cemetery Richardson Chapel Pictures Cemetery Wright Cemetery Atlas Church of Christ Cemetery Atlas Church of Christ Cemetery Booth Cemetery Brown Cemetery Crittenden Cemetery Harrison Cemetery Killen Baptist Church Cemetery Cannerday Cemetery Cohorn Cemetery Fisher-Stutts aka Jenkins Cemetery Henry Stutts Cemetery Lone Cedar Cemetery Milner’s Chapel Cemetery Mt. Zion Cemetery Old Baptist aka Pleasant Grove Cemetery Smith Cemetery Wasden Cemetery Watkins Cemetery Billingsley Cemetery Cox Cemetery Hopewell Cemetery McGee Cemetery Price Cemetery Tate-Russell Cemetery Tidwell Cemetery Wilson Cemetery Bethel Berry Cemetery Bethel Berry Cemetery Community Cemetery Community Cemetery Mt Tabor Cemetery Nolen – 1989 Cemetery Nolen – 2002 Cemetery Parsonage Cemetery Peerson Cemetery Pine Grove Cemetery...

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Biography of William H. Shepard

William H. Shepard. When William H. Shepard left college he chose the work which seemed most congenial and for which he had the greatest apparent adaptability, and entered a bank in Illinois. For thirty consecutive years he has applied himself to the subject of banking, and his business success and prominence is largely due to this concentration of effort along one line. Mr. Shepard is now vice president of the First National Bank of Coffeyville, and is identified with several other important concerns which might be classed as public utilities in that part of Kansas. His branch of the Shepard family came from England and settled in New York State prior to the Revolution. His grandfather Chauncey J. Shepard was born in 1801, lived for a number of years in Vermont, was a farmer and died at Norfolk, New York, in 1881. William H. Shepard, Sr., father of the Coffeyville banker, was born at Norfolk, New York, October 19, 1836. Three months after his birth his parents moved to Fairfax, Vermont, where he grew up and where he married. He taught school there, studied law, was admitted to the bar, and almost at the outset of his professional career moved west to Cambridge, Illinois, where he was engaged in the successful practice of his profession the rest of his life. He died at Cambridge, October 5, 1888. As a...

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