Location: Lane County OR

Keith, Lyall – Obituary

Lyall Keith of Box 300, Walton, passed away February 9, 1970 at the age of 66. He was born November 13, 1903 in Portland, Oregon and had resided in Lane County for the past 31 years. He was united in marriage to Edith Bilyeu, December 24, 1930 in Albany, Oregon. Besides his wife, he is survived by a half brother, Gordon Keith of Eureka, California; several aunts and uncles. He was a member of the Eugene Moose Lodge. Funeral services will be held in the Poole-Larsen Chapel Thursday, February 12th at 3 p.m. with private cremation to follow. [Interment Pine Grove Cemetery] Eugene Register-Guard, February 10, 1970 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Bean, Ormond Robert – Obituary

Retired Portland City Commissioner Ormond R. Bean, 89, a 31-year servant in city, state and federal governments, died early Friday morning [February 14, 1975] in the Parkview Nursing Home. Death was due to natural causes, said his son, Ormond Bean, Jr. First elected to the Portland City Council in 1932, the elder Bean served from 1933 until 1939 when he was appointed Oregon Public Utility Commissioner. From 1943 until 1946, Mr. Bean was a transportation director in America’s World War II effort, serving in Hawaii, Puerto Rico and the Middle East. Returning to Portland, he was elected once more to the City Council, serving from 1949 until his retirement in 1967. A former Portland City Hall employee, when asked why she considered Ormond R. Bean as her favorite city commissioner, said it was because “he was a man who never lost his temper nor raised his voice.” The description aptly summed up Bean who also had a long-standing reputation for his honest and integrity. He was often referred to as “the financial watchdog of City Hall.” Bean, who died early Friday at the age of 89, was once described as “the best public servant Portland ever had,” by Mark Grayson, a longtime colleague on the council. Grayson, who retired in 1970, served as Bean’s administrative assistant before running for the commission. “Ormond was a great gentleman and a fine...

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Biography of G. W. Ozmont

G.W. OZMENT. – This gentleman is a veteran of the Indian wars, a survivor of many a bloody fight in Southern Oregon, and a pioneer of 1852. Born at Greensborough, North Carolina, in 1833, he became an orphan at the age of ten, and at fifteen went to Western Virginia with an uncle, and somewhat later was in Tennessee, working on his own account. The far West, however, was the land of his dreams; and he saved his earnings to go to Paducah, and from that point to St. Louis. Three months later he was on his way to St. Joseph by steamer. But ice in the river delayed progress at the Kansas river; and there he was glad to join the train of Mr. William McCown, who was on the way to Oregon. The journey, begun May 7, 1852, was favorable, meeting with only the usual hardships of the way until reaching the Cascade Mountains. There the train met with snow; and the teams were too much exhausted to draw the loaded wagons farther. Mr. McCown pushed on to Oregon City for help, leaving Mr. Ozment two weeks in the mountains to look after the goods. The first months of Oregon life were spent in Clackamas county erecting buildings for Mr. McCown, the winter with Mr. Case on Butte creek, and the following spring with Reverend A.F. Waller...

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Biography of A. W. Patterson, M.D.

A.W. PATTERSON, M.D. – Doctor Patterson was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, October 14, 1814. He received his scholastic education in the village of Freeport, of his native state, and afterwards entered the Western University, at Pittsburgh. He subsequently studied medicine in the office of Doctor J.P. Gazzam, an old and prominent physician of that city, and in 1841 graduated with high honors from the Pennsylvania College of Medicine, of Philadelphia. Coming westward, he located at Greenfield, Indiana, and there practiced his profession until 1852, when he concluded to come to Oregon, and began the long and tedious journey known only to the pioneer. After his arrival he went to Lane county and there settled upon a Donation claim near the present site of the flourishing town of Eugene. The settlers in those days being few and far between, there was but little call for those skilled in his profession; and, being conversant with civil engineering, he engaged in the surveying business for a time. Among the contracts taken were several for the government, they being both in Oregon and Washington. The reports of surveys to be found in the surveyor-general’s office, submitted by him, will attest the guidance of a master hand. He also laid off the townsite of Eugene City. On the outbreak of the Indian war of 1855-56 in Southern Oregon, he at once offered his...

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Biographical Sketch of Geo. W. Hayes

Geo. W. Hayes stands high among the voting attorneys Eastern Oregon, and has established a foothold in Harney County from which it would be difficult to eradicate possessing as he does talent, energy, ambition and industry. He was born In Marion County, Iowa in 1859, coming across the plains with his parents in 1862, in an ox team. They located at Eugene, Lane County, where he stayed until 1874, having at intervals attended the log schoolhouse. Moving to Lake County, he kept up his studies, and at the age of 18 began teaching school, working also at the carpenter’s trade. In 1887 he began reading law, and in 1889 entered the office of C. A. Sweek, at Canyon City, and also read a year in Thornton Williams’ office. May 1891, be was admitted to the bar, and began active practice at Harney City, Oregon. In 1893 he moved to Burns. He has always been an active Republican, and takes a great interest in the welfare of its party. He is married to Miss Annie Alderson, of Harney, and has two...

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Biographical Sketch of John S. Edwards

The subject of this article is one of Malheur’s foremost men in the realm of stock raising and agricultural pursuits, which are the wealth of our County, and he has labored in the section since an early day, having the distinction of being one of the first pioneers and real builders of the County. John S. was born near Oskaloosa. Iowa, on November 25, 1849, being the son of Thomas D. and Barbara E. (Rinehart) Edwards. In 1854 the parents came with ox teams in a large train to Lane County, Oregon, passing through the territory of what is now Malheur and Barney Counties. Some stock was stolen on the road, but no other trouble befell them. In Lane County the father entered government land and settled down to farming. Until the spring of 1871 the subject of this sketch lived with his parents and then came to where Vale now stands, there being but one cabin there then. Two years later he came to the vicinity of his present home and engaged in stock business. Mr. Edwards now has about nine hundred acres of land, four hundred of which is fine bottom land and the remainder grazing land. He has the ranch well improved, occupies a fine two-story residence, has good barns and outbuildings, a fine orchard, and also owns a large band of horses and some cattle....

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Biography of William Henry Canaday

It is fitting that in a work that purports to accord to the leading citizens of Harney county representation there should be special mention of the well known business man whose name heads this article and who has labored in our midst for a number of years, gaining a good success and making for himself a name and standing which are enviable. Madison Canaday was born in Hillsboro, Highland county, Ohio, on October 21, 1831, and when a boy went with his parent to Illinois and then to Iowa, whence they crossed the plains with ox teams in 1852. They settled in Douglas county, Oregon, the parents taking a donation claim. Later they removed to Yam Hill county. Miss Sarah E. Abbott was born near Springfield, Missouri, in 1842, and started across the plains with ox teams in 1852, having traveled to Texas and returned to Missouri in 1844. The train was a large on and the dreaded cholera attacked them and her father was the first victim to succumb to that terrible disease, passing away on June 9. Before the journey was completed the mother died also, the date being September 30, and she sleeps near where Baker City now stands. Thus from the happy eastern home this child was left an orphan on the dreary plains. She came on to Yam Hill county, Oregon. There she met and...

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Biography of William L. Clark

Among the successful business men of Harney county is to be mentioned the gentleman named above, whose well known establishment of general merchandise at Lawen, where he has done business for some time, is one of the prosperous business houses of the county; and in addition to handling this, Mr. Clark has a hay farm of one hundred and sixty acres, which he attends to and also raises cattle, and also he has been a mail contractor of the interior of Oregon. William L. was born in Carroll county, Indiana, on April 3, 1845, being the son of Thomas and Ann (Davidson) Clark. In the spring of 1853, the father started across the plains with his family in an ox train from Carroll county, Indiana. They made the trip successfully, but the last six weeks they had to live on the flesh of the oxen they killed, without even the luxury of salt. Fresh meat with water for six weeks is not so pleasant as might be imagined. They came through the Harney valley and settled in Lane county, near Eugene. The remaining oxen ate poison weeds in the valley and all died. The father took a donation claim, and, being a miller, wrought at his trade in Eugene as well as handled his farm. He died in Eugene in December, 1896, and the mother died in 1899. On...

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Biographical Sketch of Frank Baker

This native young Oregonian has demonstrated what pluck and perseverance can do when manipulated with wise management in the things of the financial world, as conditions obtained in this country, having made a brilliant success, as will be noted from the following. Mr. Baker was born in Lane county, Oregon, on June 20, 1870, being the son of George and Mary (Watson) Baker. His mother died in that county and the father with his children removed to Washington county in 1874. In the fall of 1878 he came with his family to Harney valley, settling where the town of Burns is now located. The children were three boys and two girls. The father went to freighting and soon died, thus leaving the little group orphans in a frontier region. Our subject had but little opportunity to gain an education from schools, but made the best of what he did have and also by careful and diligent research qualified himself for the battle of life. He soon went to riding the range for wages and continued diligently at this occupation until 1894, when he started in for himself, handling livestock. He gained steadily and in 1898 he purchased his present place of one hundred and sixty acres three miles northeast from Burns, which is a well improved ranch, producing abundant crops of hay for his stock, which consists mostly of...

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Biography of Melvin Fenwick

A true pioneer, a man of exemplary standing and life, possessed of capabilities and qualities of worth, the estimable gentleman of whom we now speak, is entitled to representation in the volume of Harney county’s history. His parents, Alexander and Nancy (Long) Fenwick, were natives to Kentucky, and his father crossed the plains to California in 1849. He was a blacksmith and carried his tools on a pack horse and wrought at his trade, shoeing horses, and so forth, all the way. In 1851 he returned via Panama, and with his wife and seven children he came in 1852 to Amador county, California. There our subject was born on May 18, 1855, being the ninth child. The family removed to Napa county in 1858, and in August, 1863, came thence to Lane county, Oregon. There the father remained until his death in 1883. It was in February of that year that Melvin came to the Harney valley. He entered land at his present home place four miles north from Burns, and has engaged in farming and raising stock there since that time, being favored with abundant success on account of his industry and perseverance. He now owns five hundred acres of land, well improved and skillfully tilled. He formerly handled hogs, but is now devoting his attention to cattle mostly. When Mr. Fenwick came here there was but one...

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Biographical Sketch of George W. Page

Among the leading stockmen of the country, the subject of this article also stands with the prominent and substantial citizens of the county of Harney and is one of the real pioneers of this section, being also a westerner by birth. He owns Sonoma county, California, as his native place and February 13, 1858, is the date thereof. His parents were Joseph W. and Nancy (Johnson) Page. In 1867 they all came overland to Lane county, Oregon. The father had been operating a large dairy in California, and in Oregon he devoted his attention to farming, also raised stock. In 1884 our subject came to Harney county and operated a sawmill. After this he roved about in Idaho, Washington, and Oregon and in 1893 came to Harney county and engaged in the sheep business, entering into partnership with G. W. Bartlett. Later he sold out and then went into partnership with James Campbell. They divided up in 1901 and Mr. Page sold one-third interest to his brother Edward N., and his nephew, Claud Hendricks. They own several thousand head of sheep and are prosperous in this business, being skilled in handling them. Mr. Page is a member of the I. O. O. F., Drewsey Lodge, No. 147. He is a man of public spirit, has always labored for the advancement of the county and is one of the promoters...

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Biography of Capt. Pleasent Calvin Noland

CAPT. PLEASENT CALVIN NOLAND. – Captain Noland, one of the most substantial farmers of Lane County, and for nearly forty years a resident of Oregon, was born in Missouri in 1830. His ancestry extends to Ireland and Wales; and his grandfather, Leadstone Noland, was a soldier in the war of the Revolution. His father, Smallwood V. Noland, became a pioneer of Missouri, and a very conspicuous man in that region, and as commissioner of Jackson County was concerned in the removal of the Mormons, by whom he nearly lost his life. In 1846, entering the service of the United States army, Captain Noland, our subject, was sent to Indian Territory instead of Mexico, and in 1849 crossed the plains to the mines of California. Returning East in 1851, he drove the next year a team to Santa Fé, and in 1853 came to Oregon. The journey terminated in a manner as difficult and severe as that of 1845 in Meek’s cutoff; for at Matthews the immigrants were met by a man from the Willamette valley who was coming to meet his family and conduct the train by a new route to the latter place. This was to cross the Cascades by the middle fork of the Willamette River. Nearing the mountains, eight men, including Captain Noland, went ahead with ten days’ rations intending to cross the chain of the...

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Biography of Thomas Smith

THOMAS SMITH. – Mr. Smith, whose life labors have had as their result in one particular the upbuilding of the handsome village of Winchester, near the Umpqua River, was born in Oxfordshire, England, February 12, 1823; and he crossed the Atlantic with his parents in 1830. The first American home was at Rochester, and a year later at Euclid near Cleveland, Ohio; and in 1834 a removal was made to La Porte County, Indiana. Thirteen years were spent in Indiana with his parents; but in 1847 the desire to go forth and test his powers in competition with others induced him in company with a younger brother to come West. He made the six month’s journey as a teamster, armed with his rifle and equipped with an ox-whip. Many and varied were the scenes and incidents of the trip; and the usual hardships common to the most of the pioneers who came “the plains across” were suffered and endured. Not the least exciting of these were the fording of the numerous deep and swift mountain streams. Vast herds of buffaloes occasionally broke through the train; and continual rumors of Indian outrages, combined with oft-recurring pursuit of the savages for stolen stock, rendered the journey anything but monotonous. Only once was pursuit successful, – securing both stock and Indians. At other times they were glad to get themselves back safely....

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Biography of Rev. Henry Harmon Spalding

REV. H.H. SPALDING. – Rev. Henry Harmon Spalding was born at Prattsburg, New York, November 26, 1803. In early life he was left an orphan, and was brought up by strangers, who gave him almost no school advantages, so that at the age of twenty-one he began the rudiments of English grammar and arithmetic, could read so as to be understood and write after a copy. Having become a Christian, he united with the Presbyterian church of his native place in August, 1826; and between 1825 and 1828 he went to school so much that he was able to teach school. A part of the time he worked for his board and walked three miles to school. In 1828 he gave himself to missionary work, and entered Prattsburg Academy; and by 1831 he was able to enter the junior class – half way through – of Hamilton College, New York. On account of his poverty and the help he received from the education society, he was soon obliged to leave and go to the Western Reserve College, Ohio, from which he graduated in 1833. On October 12, 1833, he was married to Miss Eliza hart, of Trenton, new York, who was born at Berlin, Connecticut, being the daughter of Captain Levi and Martha hart, and who had been brought up in Ontario county, New York. In the fall of...

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