Location: Lancaster County SC

Lancaster County, South Carolina Census Records

1790 Lancaster County, South Carolina Census Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1790 Lancaster County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1790 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Lancaster County, South Carolina Census Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Lancaster District South Carolina (hosted by USGenWeb Census Project ) Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1800 Lancaster County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Lancaster County, South Carolina Census Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Lancaster County South Carolina Census Images (hosted by USGenWeb Census Project ) Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1810 Lancaster County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Lancaster County, South Carolina Census Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1820 Lancaster County, Census (images...

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Waxhaw Indians

Waxhaw Tribe: Meaning unknown. Also called: Flatheads, a name given to this tribe and others of the Catawba connection owing to their custom of deforming the head. Waxhaw Connection. Nothing of their language has been preserved, but circumstantial evidence points to a close relationship between the Waxhaw and the Catawba and hence to membership in the Siouan linguistic stock. Their closest contacts appear to have been with the Sugeree. Waxhaw Location. In Lancaster County, S. C., and Union and Mecklenburg Counties, N. C. Waxhaw Villages. Lawson mentions two villages in 1701 but the names are not given. Waxhaw History. The Waxhaw were possibly the Gueza of Vandera, who lived in western South Carolina in 1566-67. Lederer (1912) writing about 1670, speaks of the Waxhaw under the name Wisacky and says that they were subject to and might be considered a part of the Catawba. They were probably identical with the Weesock, whose children were said by Gabriel Arthur (1918) to be brought up in Tamahita (Yuchi) families “as ye Ianesaryes are mongst ye Turkes.” Lawson (1860) visited them in 1701. At the end of the Yamasee War, they refused to make peace with the English and were set upon by the Catawba and the greater part of them killed. The rest fled to the Cheraw, but a band numbering 25 accompanied the Yamasee to Florida in 1715 and are...

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Catawba Indians

Catawba Tribe: Significance unknown though the name was probably native to the tribe. Also called: Ani’ta’guă, Cherokee name. Iswa or Issa, signifying “river,” and specifically the Catawba River; originally probably an independent band which united early with the Catawba proper. Oyadagahrcenes, Tadirighrones, Iroquois names. Usherys, from iswahere, “river down here”; see Issa. Catawba Connections. The Catawba belonged to the Siouan linguistic family, but Catawba was the most aberrant of all known Siouan languages, though closer to Woccon than any other of which a vocabulary has been recorded. Catawba Location. In York and Lancaster Counties mainly but extending into the neighboring parts of the State and also into North Carolina and Tennessee. Catawba Subdivisions. Two distinct tribes are given by Lawson (1860) and placed on early maps, the Catawba and Iswa, the latter deriving their name from the native word meaning “river,” which was specifically applied to Catawba River. Catawba Villages. In early days this tribe had many villages but few names have come down to us. In 1728 there were six villages, all on Catawba River, the most northerly of which was known as Nauvasa. In 1781 they had two called in English Newton and Turkey Head, on opposite sides of Catawba River. Catawba History The Catawba appear first in history under the name Ysa, Issa (Iswa) in Vandera’s narratives of Pardo’s expedition into the interior, made in 1566-67....

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Biography of Otis R. Cureton

Otis R. Cureton, who since February, 1918, has made his home in Muskogee, is engaged in handling farm lands, loans and oil and gas leases. Broad experience in this field of labor has enabled him to win readily a large clientage and his business has steadily developed, for the Oklahoma Land & Loan Company, of which he is now the manager, is conducting an extensive and profitable business. Otis R. Cureton was born in Lancaster, South Carolina, on the 12th of October, 1879, but when quite young was taken to Florida and was educated in the public schools of that state. He early began to provide for his own support and when a lad of but ten years became a clerk in a general store, being thus employed until his sixteenth year. He was next connected with the Southern Express Company and during a period of four years rose from the humble position of helper to that of assistant route agent. On severing his connection with the Express Company he turned to general merchandising, establishing a store in Eden, Florida, where he carried on business until 1905. In that year he came to the Indian Territory, settling at Wagoner, where he has since conducted a land and real estate business. His broadening experience has given him wide knowledge of land conditions and property values in the state and he...

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Waxhaw Tribe

Waxhaw Indians. A small tribe that lived in the 17th century in what is now Lancaster County, South Carolina, and Union and Mecklenburg Counties, North Carolina. They were connected with the neighboring Sugeree, and both were apparently related to the Catawba, and therefore were Siouan. The custom of flattening the head, practiced by the Waxhaw, was also mentioned as a custom of the Catawba. Lederer (1672) says they were subject to and might be considered a part of the Catawba. Lawson visited the Waxhaw in 1701 and was hospitably received. He mentions two of their villages situated about 10 miles apart. He describes the people as very tall, and notes particularly their custom of artificially flattening the head during infancy. The dance ceremonies and councils were held in a council house, much larger than the ordinary dwellings. Instead of being covered with bark, like the domiciles, it was neatly thatched with sedge and rushes; the entrance was low, and around the walls on the inside were benches made of cane. Near the Waxhaw were the Catawba, or more likely a band of that tribe. They were probably so reduced by the Yamasee War of 1715 as to have been obliged to incorporate with the Catawba. For Further Study The following articles and manuscripts will shed additional light on the Waxhaw as both an ethnological study, and as a people....

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The Waxhaw and Sugeree Indians

The two small tribes bearing the above designations are hardly known except in connection with the Catawba Indians, with whom they were afterward incorporated. They may be treated together. The tribes lived, respectively, about Waxhaw and Sugar (i. e., Sugeree) creeks, two small streams flowing into Catawba River from the northeast, within, what is now Lancaster County, South Carolina, and Union and Mecklenburg counties, North Carolina. As previously mentioned (The Eno, Shoccoree, and Adshusheer indians) the Waxhaw practiced the custom of flattening the head, a custom probably followed also by the Catawba and other neighboring tribes, whence they were called Flatheads. The first notice of either tribe seems to be that of Lederer, who visited, the Wisacky (Warsaw) in 1672, and found them living next south of the Sara, i. e., about where they were afterward known. He dismisses them with the brief statement that they were subject to the Ushery (Catawba) and might be considered a part of that tribe 1Lederer, John. The discoveries of John Lederer, in three several marches from Virginia to the west of Carolina, and other parts of the continent. Begun in March, 1669, and ended in September, 1670. Together with a general map of the whole territory which he traversed. Collected and translated out of Latin from his discourse and writings, by Sir William Talbot, baronet, etc. London, etc. 1672, p. 17. Map...

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