Location: LaHarpe Illinois

Biographical Sketch of Noble L. Prentis

Noble L. Prentis, a leading Kansas editor for twenty-one years, and for the last decade of his life identified with the Kansas City Star, was born on April 8, 1839, in a log cabin three miles from Mount Sterling, Brown County, Illinois. His parents were natives of Vermont, descended from English settlers, and on both sides of the family came of brave Revolutionary stock. His parents died at Warsaw, Illinois, of cholera during the epidemic of 1849, leaving him an orphan at the age of ten years. He went to live with an uncle in Vermont and remained there until he was eighteen, when he moved to Connecticut and served an apprenticeship at the printer’s trade. He then came west and worked for a time in a newspaper office at Carthage, Illinois. At the opening of the Civil war he enlisted as a private in the Sixteenth Illinois Infantry and served four years, when he was honorably discharged. He published a paper at Alexandria, Missouri, until Capt. Henry King of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat induced him to come to Topeka in 1869 and assist him on the Record. During the succeeding eight years he was engaged on the Junction City Union and the Topeka Commonwealth, and about 1877 began to work on the Atchison Champion. He remained with that paper during Colonel Martin’s term as governor and in 1888...

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Biographical Sketch of Henry King

It is not the rule for men to follow the trade or profession to which they are best adapted and to achieve the dominant ambition of their lives. This inclination and result can in absolute truth be said of Capt. Henry King. He learned the printer’s trade because the attraction was irresistible, and advanced from the composing room and hand press to the editorial desk because he must have foreseen the work he was best fitted to do. His taste and capacity were for writing, a natural force impelling him to reduce the workings of his mind to written form–and it was real writing, for he never used a stenographer or typewriter, and his “copy” was the perfection of chirography. As a young man he published and edited a weekly newspaper at his home town, LaHarpe, Illinois. This work was interrupted by a four years’ service in the army in 1861-65. Returning from the army, he engaged in a profitless mercantile business, and studied law, but all the time there was a ceaseless call to write, and he was soon working on the Daily Whig, at Quincy, Illinois, of which he became editor. Later, in 1869, he removed to Topeka, where in turn he edited the State Record, the Commonwealth and the Capital. From the latter post he went to the St. Louis Globe-Democrat, in 1883, first as contributing editor,...

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Biography of Charles Reynolds Love

Charles Reynolds Love. A former Topeka citizen well remembered for his activity in business and his benevolence and splendid character was the late Charles Reynolds Love. Mr. Love came to Kansas a great many years ago, and spent many years in Topeka, where he died April 15, 1910. He was of an old and prominent Pennsylvania family and was born at Newcastle in that state August 23, 1848. His parents were John Brown and Maria (Chenoweth) Love, both natives of Pennsylvania. Maria Chenoweth was the daughter of Arthur and Maria (Reynolds) Chenoweth, both of whom were natives of Virginia. This branch of the Chenoweth family is descended in direct line from Oliver Cromwell. The Chenoweths were among the first settlers around Newcastle, Pennsylvania, and the old farm owned by the family included land on which the court-house now stands. The Chenoweth family has furnished many statesmen and makers of history all down the line. Charles R. Love had two brothers who saw active service in the Civil war. Alfred W., one of these brothers, is now deceased, and George Pearson lives in California. Alfred was in Sherman’s army, participated in the great Atlanta campaign and the march to the sea, having enlisted from Illinois. George Pearson ran away from home at the age of sixteen in order to enlist. There was also one sister who died at the age...

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Biography of Fred Leslie Ervay

Fred Leslie Ervay, M. D. The medical fraternity of Wilson County had as one of its highly skilled and thoroughly trained members Dr. Fred Leslie Ervay, who had been engaged in a general practice at Fredonia since 1908. While Doctor Ervay had not carried on his profession as long as some of his fellow practitioners, he had risen to a prominent place in his calling, and the confidence in which he is held is evidenced by the size and importance of his clientele. He was born at Elk Point, South Dakota, June 14, 1880, and is a son of H. M. and Sarah (Pope) Ervay. Henry N. Ervay, the grandfather of Doctor Ervay, was born in France, where he saw military service, and when still a young man came to the United States and settled at Allentown, Pennsylvania, where he became the proprietor of a tannery and continued to be engaged in that line of business until his death, which occurred before the birth of his grandson. H. M. Ervay was born at Allentown, Pennsylvania, in 1845, received a public school education, and when a youth learned the tanning business under the instruction of his father. He went as a young man to Freeport, Illinois, where he was married, and was employed in a tannery there for several years, following which he went to Sioux City, Iowa, there pre-empting...

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