Location: Lafayette Indiana

Seabury Family of New Bedford, Massachusetts

SEABURY – variously spelled Sebury, Saberry, Saberrey and Sabury. The American ancestor of the Seaburys of New Bedford was (I) John Seabury, of Boston, who died before 1662. He married Grace, and had two sons – John (who went to Barbados) and Samuel (born Dec. 10, 1640) – and several daughters. (II) Samuel Seabury, son of John, born Dec. 10, 1640, died Aug. 5, 1681. He married at Weymouth Nov. 9, 1660, Patience Kemp, who died Oct. 29, 1676. He married (second) April 4, 1677, Martha Pabodie, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Alden) Pabodie and granddaughter of John and...

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Slave Narrative of John W. Fields

Interviewer: Cecil Miller Person Interviewed: John W. Fields Location: Lafayette, Indiana Place of Birth: Owensburg, KY Date of Birth: March 27, 1848 Age: 89 Place of Residence: N. 20th St., Lafayette, Indiana Cecil C. Miller Dist. #3 Tippecanoe Co. INTERVIEW WITH MR. JOHN W. FIELDS, EX-SLAVE OF CIVIL WAR PERIOD September 17, 1937 John W. Fields, 2120 North Twentieth Street, Lafayette, Indiana, now employed as a domestic by Judge Burnett is a typical example of a fine colored gentleman, who, despite his lowly birth and adverse circumstances, has labored and economized until he has acquired a respected place in his home community. He is the owner of three properties; un-mortgaged, and is a member of the colored Baptist Church of Lafayette. As will later be seen his life has been one of constant effort to better himself spiritually and physically. He is a fine example of a man who has lived a morally and physically clean life. But, as for his life, I will let Mr. Fields speak for himself: “My name is John W. Fields and I’m eighty-nine (89) years old. I was born March 27, 1848 in Owensburg, Ky. That’s 115 miles below Louisville, Ky. There was 11 other children besides myself in my family. When I was six years old, all of us children were taken from my parents, because my master died and his estate...

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Slave Narrative of John Fields

Interviewer: Cecil Miller Person Interviewed: John W. Fields Location: Lafayette, Indiana Place of Residence: 2120 N. 20th Street, Lafayette, Indiana Cecil Miller Dist. #3 Tipp. Co. [TR: Tippecanoe Co.] NEGRO FOLKLORE MR. JOHN FIELDS, EX-SLAVE 2120 N. 20th St. Lafayette, Indiana Mr. Fields says that all negro slaves were ardent believers in ghosts, supernatual powers, tokens and “signs.” The following story illustrates the point. “A turkey gobbler had mysteriously disappeared from one of the neighboring plantations and the local slaves were accused of commeting the fowl to a boiling pot. A slave convicted of theft was punished severly. As all of the slaves denied any knowledge of the turkey’s whereabouts, they were instructed to make a search of the entire plantation.” “On one part of the place there was a large peach orchard. At the time the trees were full of the green fruit. Under one of the trees there was a large cabinet or “safe” as they were called. One of the slaves accidently opened the safe and, Behold, there was Mr. Gobbler peacefully seated on a number of green peaches. “The negro immediately ran back and notified his master of the discovery. The master returned to the orchard with the slave to find that the negro’s wild tale was true. A turkey gobbler sitting on a nest of green peaches. A bad omen. “The master had a...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel L. Nolan

While now a well known figure in the public life of Sedgwick County as county treasurer, Samuel L. Nolan during nearly forty years of residence in the county had rendered his chief service as a business man. He had been a merchant, banker and manufacturer and is one of the big men in his section of the state. He was born at Lafayette, Indiana, March 7, 1862. In 1877, when he was fifteen years of age, his parents moved to Kansas, arriving at Wichita on the 17th of March in the same year. In the meantime he had attended school back in Indiana, and completed his education at Wichita. In 1884, at the age of twenty-two, Mr. Nolan embarked in merchandising at Goddard, and that had been his home town ever since. While still a merchant he organized the Goddard State Bank, and as its president had made that a strong and reliable institution in his part of the county. He also owned a large stock and grain farm near Goddard. Mr. Nolan was one of the promoters of the Central State First Insurance Company of Wichita, of Wichita, of which he is vice president. Only recently he took the lead in organizing the Perfection Broom Corn Harvester Company of Wichita. This company was established to make a machine which cuts, threshes and sorts the brush ready for market....

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Biography of Jacob E. Maus

Jacob E. Maus. One of the early settlers of Shawnee County as well as one of its prosperous farmers is Jacob E. Maus, who has additional claims to consideration, for he is a veteran of the great Civil war, a survivor of a struggle that brought peace and prosperity, almost uninterrupted for a half century. Jacob E. Maus was born in Carroll County, Maryland, June 11, 1844. His parents were John and Louisa (Erb) Maus; his grandfather was Jacob Maus, and his great-grandfather was George Maus, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. John Maus followed the family avocation of farming and spent his entire life near the Village of Silver Run, Maryland, where he died in 1882. Of his family of children, Jacob E. was the only one to reach maturity. Jacob E. Maus was afforded far better educational opportunities than many of his young comrades, attending the Silver Run High School after completing his course in the district schools, and after satisfactorily passing examination for a teacher’s certificate, taught school acceptably for some time. In search of a wider field of effort, in 1863 Mr. Maus went to LaFayette, Indiana, and in that city, on January 15, 1864, enlisted for service in the Union army, becoming a member of Company L. Fifth Indiana Cavalry, which numerically became the Ninetieth. Mr. Maus’ regiment reached the front in...

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Biography of Wilber A. Cochel, Prof.

Prof. Wilber A. Cochel. There is no doubt but that educational education means more to the United States today than any other kind of education and great institutions like the Kansas State Agricultural College are standard bearers in disseminating agricultural knowledge. This college management, with remarkable judgment, has gathered together a group of thoroughly trained instructors covering every phase of agriculture, the agriculture of modern progress. At the head of the animal husbandry division is found Prof. Wilber A. Coehel, a scholar and scientist whose name carries weight in many states of the Union on account of his discoveries and solid achievements. Wilber A. Cochel was born at Tipton, Missouri, August 7, 1877, and is a son of William H. and Charlotte (Calvin) Cochel. He was reared at Tipton where his father was a hardware merchant and also a farmer. On his father’s farm he gained his first practical lessons in agriculture, not unwillingly, for he has always loved the soil and been interested in its development and possibilities. He was afforded educational advantages and after being graduated from the Tipton High School, he entered the academic department of the University of Missouri, from which he was graduated in 1897. During the succeeding five years Mr. Cochel was mainly engaged in general farming, stockraising and feeding and dealing in cattle. Desiring further scientific knowledge he entered the agricultural department...

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Biographical Sketch of Worth M. Tippy

Tippy, Worth M.; clergyman; born, Larwill, Ind.; Nov. 8, 1867; son of Oren and Mary Elizabeth Carder Tippy; educated, DePauw University, Ph. B., DePauw University, Hon. D. D., Baldwin University, Hon. D. D., Cornell University, two years graduate work as Sage scholar, 1901-1903; married, Vevay, Ind., May 16, 1895, Zella Birda Ward; issue, Marian Ward, born Nov. 18, 1896; Helen Ward, born Dec. 12, 1898; member of Mayor’s Committee on nomination for Charter Commission, 1913; pastorates, Dryden, N. Y., 1892; LaFayette, Ind., 1893; Oxford, Ind., 1894; Terre Haute, Ind., 1895; Broadway Church, Indianapolis, Ind., 1900; Epworth Memorial, Cleveland, 1905 to present date; university preacher, Indiana University, 1901-1904; Cornell University, 1909-1911-1913; lecturer on “The Social Functions of the Church,” Post Graduate Ass’n, Bloomington, Ill., and before the pastor’s organizations and conferences in South Dakota and Indiana; member executive Committee Methodist Federation for Social Service; pres., 1912-1913, Federated Churches of Cleveland; director Humane Society, City Club; member St. Luke’s Hospital Ass’n; member Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity, Psi Phi Chapter; member Chamber of Commerce, Council of Sociology, and Indianapolis Literary Club; fond of flowers and all outdoor sports. Author of “The Socialized Church,” 1909; prominent on committees of finance and conference work of Methodist denomination; member committee on Social Service, Cornell...

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Biographical Sketch of Henry Taylor

Taylor, Henry; florist; born, England, March 16, 1852; son of Charles and Susan New Taylor; educated, West Fendred British National School; married, Wellsville, O., Feb. 8, 1877, Susan Coyle; issue, five children; at the age of 16, began working at plumbing; followed that until 1908; worked for some of the best firms in Cleveland, Cincinnati, O., and Lafayette, Ind., as a journeyman plumber; held responsible positions with good firms in all the abovenamed cities; 1908, started in the florist...

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Biography of Augustine P. Heimann, Rev.

Rev. Augustine P. Heimann is the beloved priest and rector of St. Martin’s Catholic Church at Plqua, Kansas. He is a veteran in the service of the church in Kansas. He came to the state more than a quarter of a century ago, soon after his ordination as a priest, and for years had devoted himself to the constructive as well as the spiritual administration of several important parishes in different counties. Father Heimann was born in Lafayette, Indiana, February 15, 1866. His father, August Heimann, was born in Silesia, Prussia, in 1834. When eighteen years of age he came to America, locating at Lafayette, Indiana, and spent many years in the railroad service. He finally retired and came to Kansas to live with his son, Father Helmann, and died at Odin in this state in 1910. August Heimann married Louiss Miller. She was born in 1836, at Dunningen in Wuertemberg, Germany, and her parents came to this country in 1850, locating in Covington, Indiana. August Heimann and wife had the following family: Albert, who died at the age of four years; Mary, who died when three years old; Augustine P.; and Emma, who became a member of the Sisterhood of the Precious Blood and died in 1912. Father Heimann was educated in the parochial schools of Lafayette, Indiana. He was early destined for the priesthood, and for five...

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Biography of J. B. Congle

J.B. CONGLE. – Mr. Congle was one of the men of wealth who contributed largely to the early growth and prosperity of our state, and especially of Portland. He was born December 9, 1817, in Chester county, Pennsylvania. In the year 1832 he went to Philadelphia to learn the harness and saddlery trade, and in the spring of 1838 removed to Virginia, thence to Missouri, and in the year 1841 was at Lafayette, Indiana, where he resided ten years thereafter. On May 21, 1844, he was married to Miss Ellen H. Gray, of the place last named. He came as an argonaut to California in 1849, and returned to years later to his home in Indiana. In 1853 he came to Oregon and located at Corvallis, then known as Marysville, and esteemed the head of permanent navigation. Here he lived eight years, and was the first mayor of the city. In 1857 he was elected sheriff of Benton county, but resigned the position after three months. In 1861 he removed to Portland, and made that city his residence until his death. Positions of trust and honor he was frequently called upon to fill, and served the public faithfully. He was elected councilman of the second ward in 1870, and in 1872 was chosen representative to the state legislature from Multnomah county. He became a member of the Masonic order...

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Biography of Judge M. V. Harrison

JUDGE M.V. HARRISON. – This early builder of Arlington, Oregon, and highly esteemed gentleman, was born in West Virginia in December, 1857, and in 1865 accompanied his parents to Indiana. He enjoyed educational advantages in a graded school at Dayton, gaining a good foundation for his later studies. In 1877 he began reading law under J.R. Carnahan at Lafayette, Indiana, but after a year abandoned this project and formed the purpose of learning the requirements and forms of mercantile life, and in pursuance of this plan accepted a position as clerk in a store. In 1880 he sought a larger life upon our Pacific coast and came hither, locating in the Yakima country. The following year he undertook the hard and adventurous trip back across the Rocky Mountains as one of the drovers of a band of cattle to Cheyenne. In the fall of 1882 he returned to our coast, locating at Arlington, where he opened a store, having an excellent assortment of goods, – the first stock of the kind placed in Arlington. In 1883 he disposed of this business and engaged with Mr. J.W. Smith, who had in the meantime brought in a very large stock of goods. In 1883 he established the hardware business, which he still manages with satisfactory results. In his public relations, Mr. Harrison has been active and efficient. He has served as...

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