Location: Lafayette County MO

Biographical Sketch of James C. Harrah

James C. Harrah was born in Daviess county, Missouri, November 29, 1844. He is the son of Robert H. Harrah a native of Greenbrier county, West Virginia. His father came to Missouri in 1840, and died in Holt county in February, 1865. His mother’s maiden name was Elizabeth Nation, and she was a native of East Tennessee. Our subject was reared and educated in his native county and has spent his life thus far here. He began farming on his own account at an early age and continued (except during the war) in that avocation until the winter of 1872 when he commenced dealing in nursery stock which is his present occupation. Mr. Harrah enlisted in the First Regiment Missouri State Militia, February 23, 1862, and served three years participating in all the engagements of the campaign during that time in Southern Missouri. He was discharged at St. Louis, February 23, 1865. Mr. Harrah was married at Waverly, Lafayette county, Missouri, March -4, 1867, to Miss Cornelia B. Scott, daughter of M. C. and Margaret Scott. Mrs. Harrah is a native of Saline county. They have five children: Robert M., Virginia L., Emmett O., Georgia A., and Floyd. Mr. H. is a member of the Baptist Church and his excellent lady of the Christian Church; He moved to Jamesport in 1878 and has since resided there, and is highly...

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Biography of Nathaniel G. Cruzen

Nathaniel G. Cruzen was born in Jefferson county, Virginia, October 14, 1826, and is the son of Richard R., and Aurelia W. (North) Cruzen. His father was born in Loudoun county, Virginia, and for thirty years filled the position of inspector of the National Armory at Harper’s Ferry. His mother was born in Fairfax county, Virginia. Our subject was educated at Harper’s Ferry and worked under his father’s instructions in the armory until he was twenty years of age, and then immigrated to Missouri and settled upon a farm in Saline county, where he remained until 1849. Then becoming imbued with the “gold fever,” young Cruzen went to California and engaged in mining there during four years with fair success. Returning to Saline county he purchased a farm near his father’s, upon which he lived until the outbreaking of the Civil War, when he enlisted at Miami, in December 1861, in Company A, commanded by F. S. Robertson, and followed the fortunes of the cause of the “Sunny South” through four long years of civil strife. The first engagement in which Company A participated was at Kirkpatrick’s Mill, near Knob Noster, December 19, where the whole command was captured by Col. Jeff. C. Davis. Mr. Cruzen was taken to St. Louis and thrown with others into Gratiot Street Prison. After remaining in confinement there during three months, he was...

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Biography of Hon. Matthew W. Mitchell

HON. MATTHEW W. MITCHELL. – In at least two distinct lines of enterprise has the subject of this sketch achieved commendable success, and has wrought his way to the present prominent position that he holds by dint of real effort of worth and by manifestation of capabilities that are worthy of note, and by the display of integrity and upright principles. Coming with his father to this state when he was but a child he is practically a product of the state and here he has won the laurels and made the record that is his now to enjoy. On November 13, 1843, the subject of this sketch was born to Frederick and Rebecca (Hill) Mitchell, in Lafayette county, Missouri. His parents were natives of Virginia and came to this state in 1852, using ox teams for the entire journey and settling in Douglas county. His father imported considerable stock when he came to the state and was unfortunate enough to lose nearly all of it the first winter on account of the inclemency of the weather. Following this he took a donation claim in southern Oregon and gave his attention to general farming until the spring of 1863, when he drove stock to the Grande Ronde valley, taking up a homestead here and occupying himself in farming. Returning more particularly to the subject of this sketch, he entered...

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Slave Narrative of Harriet Ann Daves

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Harriet Ann Daves Location: 601 E. Cabarrus Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Birth: June 6, 1856 My full name is Harriet Ann Daves, I like to be called Harriet Ann. If my mother called me when she was living, I didn’t want to answer her unless she called me Harriet Ann. I was born June 6, 1856. Milton Waddell, my mother’s marster was my father, and he never denied me to anybody. My mother was a slave but she was white. I do not know who my mother’s father was. My mother was Mary Collins. She said that her father was an Indian. My mother’s mother was Mary Jane Collins, and she was white–maybe part Indian. My grandfather was old man William D. Waddell, a white man. I was born in Virginia near Orange Courthouse. The Waddells moved to Lexington, Missouri, after I was born. I guess some of the family would not like it if they knew I was telling this. We had good food and a nice place to live. I was nothing but a child, but I know, and remember that I was treated kindly. I remember the surrender very well. When the surrender came my grandfather came to mother and told her: ‘Well, you are as free as I am.’ That was William D. Waddell. He was one...

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Biography of Thomas Harper Cobbs

Thomas Harper Cobbs, lawyer and senior member of the firm of Cobbs & Logan, 1111-1116 Third National Bank building, St. Louis, Missouri, was born August 26, 1868, on a farm in Fairview township, Lafayette county, about six miles southeast of Napoleon, Missouri. His father, Thomas T. Cobbs, was a native of Tennessee. His grandfather, Thomas Cobbs, was a native of Virginia and a descendant of EnglishWelsh parents. His grandfather was among the pioneer settlers of Lafayette county, having come to that county in 1830, and having built the first gristmill in that section. After his grandfather’s death, his father operated the old water power gristmill until it became out of date and then devoted himself to farming until 1890, when he retired and moved to Marshall, Missouri, where he died in 1913. His mother, Catherine Harper Cobbs, was a native of Woodford county, Kentucky, and a member of the Harper family, one of the best known families in the “blue grass” region. They were breeders of fine horses and were the owners of “Longfellow” and “Tenbroek,” two of the most famous race horses of their day. His mother died at Marshall, Missouri, in 1910. He has one brother, William S. Cobbs, of Norborne, Missouri, and one sister, Mrs. Ethel Hyland, of Marshall, Missouri, now living and has lost two sisters, Mrs. Catherine Chinn and Mrs. Sarah Drysdale. Thomas Harper...

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Biography of Waller W. Graves

Waller W. Graves, of Jefferson City, judge of the supreme court and recognized as a peer of the ablest members who have sat upon the bench in the court of last resort in Missouri, was born in Lafayette county, this state, December 17, 1860. His parents, Abram L. and Martha Elizabeth (Pollard) Graves, were natives of Missouri and Kentucky, respectively. The father, a farmer by occupation, was also actively interested in public affairs, particularly in relation to the schools and for many years served as a member of the board of education. He was also a Justice of the peace and in official and non-official capacities had much to do with the advancement of public welfare in his county. He died in January. 1919. Waller W. Graves, after obtaining a high school education in his native county, attended the State University at Columbia, but before reaching graduation took up the profession of teaching in Lafayette county. After spending a few months in the school room as an educator he went to Bates county, where he taught school until 1885, at which time he was admitted to the bar, having in the previous years devoted his leisure to the mastery of the principles of jurisprudence. Five years’ study of Kent, Blackstone and other commentaries had qualified him for admission to the bar and he entered upon the general practice of...

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Biography of Benjamin E. Bradley

Benjamin E. Bradley, general manager of the Star of St. Louis and widely known in newspaper circles throughout the country, was born in Lafayette county, Missouri, October 13, 1869, and is a son of Benjamin A. and Martha R. (Briggs) Bradley. The father died August 30, 1919, at the venerable age of eighty-seven years, being then the oldest living native-born resident of Johnson county, Missouri. The family has been represented on American soil through many generations and the forebears of Benjamin E. Bradley have fought in all the different wars from the Revolution, while his son Philip was a soldier in France in the World war. Benjamin E. Bradley completed his education in the University of Missouri. His life has been given to the newspaper business and steadily he has advanced to prominence in journalistic circles. He was manager at one time of the Western Democrat at Missoula, Montana, afterward city editor of the Times, the Post and the Republican at Denver, Colorado, later became legislative correspondent of the Chronicle of San Francisco and upon his return to the middle west accepted the position of managing editor of the Inter-Ocean of Chicago. Returning to his native state, he was assistant general manager of the Post-Dispatch until he became identified with the Star, of which he is now vice president and general manager. Mr. Bradley has been married twice. In...

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Biography of William Waddell Duke, M.D.

Dr. William Waddell Duke, physician of Kansas City, was born in Lexington, Missouri, a son of Henry Buford and Susan (Waddell) Duke, the former a native of Louisville, Kentucky, and the latter of Lexington, Missouri. The father, now retired, was a manufacturer of farm implements and harness of the firm of Buford & George Manufacturing Company. Dr. Duke attended the Kansas City schools until graduated from the high school with the class of 1901. He next entered Yale University and gained his Ph. B. degree in 1904, while in 1908 Johns Hopkins University conferred upon him the M. D. degree, following the completion of the regular four years course in that institution. He next entered the Massachusetts General Hospital as an interne and was graduated in 1910, while in 1911 he did postgraduate work in the University of Vienna. He was voluntary assistant in research at the University of Tubingen, Wurttemberg, in 1912, and since then has devoted his attention to the practice of medicine. He has carried on a consulting practice in internal medicine in Kansas City from 1912 to the present time and has manifested a most active and helpful interest in medical research since entering upon the study o1 medicine and has contributed much to the current literature of the profession. He is the author of a monograph entitled, “Oral Sepsis in Its Relationship to Systemic Disease,”...

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Biography of O. H. P. Catron

O. H. P. CATRON. Few men in the county are better known or more popular than O. H. P. Catron, who is one of the proprietors of the Daily and Weekly Gazette of West Plains, Missouri This is the only daily published in this section, and although the weekly has been known here for many years, the daily has only known an existence of six years. The Gazette is one of the brightest, newsiest sheets published in southwest Missouri, and commands an ever widening circulation. Mr. Catron came to West Plains in March, 1882. He was born in Lafayette County, Missouri, December 27, 1842. A son of Stephen and Elizabeth B. (Smith) Catron. The grandfather, Christopher Catron, was a native of Virginia, but at an early date moved to Tennessee where his father was born, and thence to Missouri in 1818. There he followed farming until his death. His parents came from Germany. The father of our subject was about eight years of age when he came with his parents to Missouri, and in Lafayette County he passed his entire life. Like his father, he was an agriculturist. He served in the Indian wars in Missouri, and was also in the Mormon trouble in that State. In politics he was an advocate of Democratic principles. Of the ten children born to his marriage, seven are now living: W. J....

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Biography of W. H. H. Miller

W. H. H. MILLER. Among the men who early cast their fortunes in what is now Christian County, Missouri, was one whose memory is treasured by the few remaining pioneers of a rapidly passing age, a man of honest integrity and sterling worth, we refer to Jesse Miller, the father of the subject of this sketch. He was born in North Carolina about 1800, and when but a boy went with his parents to Tennessee, where he met and married Miss Eunice Vanzandt, a native of Georgia, born about 1809. Until 1852 this worthy couple made their home in Tennessee, and then moved to what is now Christian County, Missouri They located near Linden and rented land a few years, but subsequently purchased land in the same vicinity. There Mr. Miller died in 1856. He was a well-to-do farmer and was ever thrifty, honest and industrious. He was a soldier in the Indian wars, and was the only one of the family who came to Missouri. His two brothers, Henry and James, are deceased as are also several sisters. In his political views Mr. Miller advocated the principles of the Whig Party. His wife, who was a member of the Methodist Church many years, died in August, 1892. They were the parents of thirteen children as follows: Matilda, deceased, was the wife of Huston McDaniel; Mary A., wife of...

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Biography of Johnson Mulkey

JOHNSON MULKEY. – This prominent pioneer of Oregon was born in Knox County, Kentucky, in January, 1808. His father, Philip Mulkey, and mother (whose maiden name was Margaret Miller), were natives of Germany. In the year 1818 they moved with their young family to Missouri, settling in Lafayette County, where the father soon after died, leaving his widow with nine children. Johnson was married in 1835 to Mrs. Susan Roberts, née Brown. In the summer of 1845 he crossed the plains to Oregon, and on arriving took up a land claim in Benton county three miles west of what is now Corvallis. Returning to Missouri in 1846, in the spring of 1847 he again started westward, accompanied by his family, two brothers, Luke and Thomas, with their families, and also a large number of old friends and neighbors. The company brought a large herd of cattle. after a summer’s long, hard travel, so well remembered by all early pioneers, they arrived in the Willamette valley in the month of October. Mr. Mulkey engaged in the avocation of rearing and dealing in stock. His home was always open to new settlers, whom he assisted according to their necessities with work, seeds, and kind, encouraging words. Finding the church organization to which he belonged struggling to gain a foothold in the new country, he immediately connected therewith and contributed liberally toward...

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Biographical Sketch of Ray E. Frazier

Ray E. Frazier, the elder son of Nathan F. and Emma (Crook) Frazier, was born at El Dorado September 15, 1876. He received his education in the public schools of El Dorado and at Wentworth Military Academy, Lexington, Missouri, from which he was graduated in 1895, and began his financial training in a minor position in the Merchants National Bank, or which his father was president. There he evinced a marked aptitude for banking and applied himself so earnestly to his duties that upon the organization of the Citizens State Bank he was made assistant cashier and later vice president. In the death of his father, in 1907, be succeeded him as president of the institution, the executive interests of which he had since ably dirccted. Mr. Frazier inherited much of his father’s keen business acumen, and is poasessed of a pleasing personality and a faculty for making friends and retaining them. He had large interesls in oil and farm lands in Kansas and Oklahoma, and also owned valuable farm lands in Missouri. On June 17, 1903, Mr. Frazier was married to Miss Henrietta Ellet, daughter of Howard C. Ellet, Mr. Frazier’s father’s former banking associate and for many years a resident of El Dorado. Mr. and Mrs. Frazler have one daughter, Henrietta, born November 13, 1905. Mrs. Frazier, a woman of culture and of rare personal charm, is...

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Biography of George E. Erb

In the last half century, especially, it is seldom that one wins prominence in several lines. It is the tendency of the age to devote one’s entire energies to a special line, continually working upward and concentrating his efforts toward accomplishing a desired end; yet in the case of George E. Erb it is demonstrated that a leading position may be reached in more than one line of action. He is an able educator, a successful stock-dealer and business man and a recognized leader in political circles. By reason of his prominent connection with the public life and interests of Lewiston, and on account of his reputation, which extends far beyond the confines of the city, he is well entitled to representation in this volume. Mr. Erb was born in Lafayette County, Missouri. April 26, 1866, and is of German descent. His father. Maximum Erb, was born in Germany, and when a young man crossed the Atlantic to the United States. He served throughout the Mexican war as a loyal defender of his adopted land, and then took up his residence in Missouri, becoming one of the enterprising farmers of that state. He married Miss Mary A. Ferguson, and died in 1878, at the age of fifty-six years. The widow with her five children, four sons and a daughter, crossed the plains to Oregon in 1884, and she has...

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Biography of Hon. Samuel F. Taylor

Hon. Samuel F. Taylor was not a pioneer of Idaho Falls simply. He was one of a very few who were pioneers at that locality before the town had a beginning, and was active in an enterprise which was influential in locating a town at that point on the Snake river. He came to the place in 1870 with his cousin, J. M. Taylor, who with the firm of Taylor & Anderson, built the bridge across the Snake river at the falls. It was the first bridge in this part of the state, was a great aid to immigration and made Idaho Falls (then Eagle Rock) a point of so much importance on the route into this country, and to the country beyond, that the springing up of a good town there was a foregone conclusion, and only a matter of time. Samuel F. Taylor is a member of an old Kentucky family, and his paternal grandfather was a pioneer in that state. Samuel F. Taylor, Sr., his father, was born there and married Fanny Simpson, and in his time was prominent in that state. Samuel F. Taylor, Jr., was born in Kentucky April 18, 1848, and in 1849 his parents removed to Missouri and located in Lafayette County. His father was a lawyer and a farmer. The family were strict Presbyterians. Samuel F. Taylor, Sr., was an ardent...

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Biography of George Schmadeka

History was at one time almost entirely a record of wars, a tale of conquest in which armed hosts went forth to capture, pillage and destroy, but with advancing civilization it has become a very different chronicle, being now more particularly the story of the onward march of progress, the upbuilding of towns and the establishment of those enterprises and interests which contribute to man’s happiness and welfare. In pursuing the study of Idaho’s history we find that the flourishing town of Grangeville owes its existence in part to the gentleman whose name heads this sketch. He arrived on Camas prairie, July 3, 1876, and celebrated the centennial of our national existence at the place which has since been his home. Here he has kept untarnished his good name, and is accounted one of the loyal citizens of his adopted land. Mr. Schmadeka was born in Hanover, Germany, June 25, 1830, and is of stanch German lineage. He acquired his education in the Fatherland and came to the United States in 1849, then in his nineteenth year. He landed at New Orleans to find himself among a people whose manners and language were utterly unfamiliar to him, but he possessed a resolute spirit and strong-determination, and it was not long before he had gained a start in business life here. He finally joined a party emigrating to Missouri, and...

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