Location: Labette County KS

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Benoni H. Durall

(See Duncan) Ada Bertha, daughter of John Robert and Emma (Landrum) Dobkins was born August 6, 1879. Educated at Chetopa, Kansas. Married at Welch, August 25, 1897 Benona H., son of B. S. and Anna Durall, born March 9, 1873 in Neosho County, Kansas. They are the parents of Harold Robert, born June 23, 1898. Enlisted in the navy during the World War assigned to the reserves force stationed at Pelham Bay, N. Y. from May 29, 1918 to February 1, 1919. Married May 15, 1921 Florence L. Rodant; Hugh Allen, born November 16, 1902; George Marvin, born March 2, 1905; Ada Leah, born May 5, 1907, and Charles Ivan Durall, born March 10, 1913. Mrs. Benona H. Durall is a member of the Methodist Church, Rebecca and Eastern Star orders. Mr. Durall is engaged in the insurance and loan business in...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. C. E. Woodward

(See Ross and Holland).-Florence Ella, daughter of Daniel L. and Ruth Caroline (Holland) Ross was born November 30, 1879. Educated in the Cherokee Public Schools, Female Seminary and North Eastern State Normal. Married at Parsons, Kansas, February 6, 1910, Charles Earl, son of John W. and Nancy E. Woodward, born July 15, 1880 in Dent County, Missouri. Educated in Salem High School and Draughon’s Business College. Mr. Woodward taught school four years before their marriage and Mrs. Woodward taught ten years. Re was postmaster at Vera under President Wilson....

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Slave Narrative of Jim Threat

Person Interviewed: Jim Threat Place of Birth: Talidiga County, Alabama Date of Birth: September 1851 We all sung dat song and had a lot of fun singing it but it was true jest the same. Dat was one of the things dat the niggers dreaded most, was a patteroller. Slaves would have a little party all the niggers would gather at one of the cabins and lock the door so the patterollers couldn’t git in. When the party was over and they started home the patterollers would stop them and demand their passes. Woe to the nigger that didn’t have one! I guess they was all right in some cases but they over-done it I can tell you. I recollects that down in the neighborhood jest below us we was all the time hearing about the patterollers beating some nigger. Finally the slaves got tired of it and decided to do something about it. One night they got some grape vines and twisted them together and stretched them across the road. They went down the road and waited and finally four or five patterollers come along. The nigger boys started running back up the road and by this time the Patterollers was running their horses full speed after them. Just before they got to the vines the niggers ducked out of the road and the horses run full tilt...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Louise H. Horrell

Horrell, Mrs. Louise H. (See England)—Louisa H. daughter of William and Mary Jane (England) Habish, born June 23, 1878. Educated in the Cherokee Public Schools and Worchester Academy, Vinita. Married at Oswego, Kansas March 8, 1905, George T., son of Benjamin and Mary Frances Horrel. They are the parents of: Mary Thelma, born February 9, 1906 and Allen C. Horrel, born October 31, 1908. Mr. Horrell is a stillman with the St. Clair Refining...

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Biographical Sketch of Richard W. Blue

Richard W. Blue, a Union veteran of Virginia and a leading lawyer and judge of Kansas, finally advanced to the halis of Congress as a representative of his adopted state. He was born in Wood County, Virginia, September 8, 1841, and was raised on a mountain farm near the present city of Grafton. In 1859 he entered Monongalia Academy at Morgantown, Va., and remained at that institution several years, first as pupil and later as teacher, Subsequently he entered Washington College, Pennsylvania, and remained there until he enlisted in the Third West Virginia Infantry, at the opening of the Civil war. Mr. Blue was wounded in the Battle of Rocky Gap, in Southwestern Virginia, promoted to second lieutenant for gallantry in action, and within a short time was commissioned captain. In one of the engagements he was captured and held as a prisoner of war at Libby prison and also at Danville, Va. The regiment was mounted and after the Salem raid was changed, by order of the secretary of war, to the Sixth West Virginia Cavalry. Its final service was in a campaign on the plains against the Indians at the close of the war. The regiment was mustered out at Fort Leavenworth, so that Mr. Blue was in Kansas during the early ’60s. After his discharge from the army he returned to Virginia, taught school, read law...

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Biography of Richard Allen

Richard Allen had been professor of history in the Montgomery County High School since the organization of that excellent institution more than fifteen years ago. He is one of the most widely known educators in Southern Kansas. His Allen ancestors came originally from England, one branch settling in Massachusetts and the other in Virginia during colonial days. His grandfather, William Allen, was born in Virginia in 1780, and some years later the family moved across the mountains into Kentucky, and subsequently became early settlers in Illinois. William Allen died in White County, Illinois, in 1845. Richard Allen was born in Logan County, Illinois, December 7, 1864. His father, B. F. Allen, was born in White County of that state in 1833, and was one of the Kansas pioneers, Reared in Illinois, and taking up the vocation of farmer there he first came out to Kansas in 1859, when it was still a territory. He spent some time near Augusta in Butler County, being there when the population was almost completely composed of Indians and before the homestead act was passed. He afterwards returned to Illinois, and served as a soldier in the Civil war, but after four months was incapacitated being taken ill with cholera and his life was despaired of for some time. After the war he followed farming in Logan County, Illinois, but in 1871 emigrated across...

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Biography of Christopher Columbus Michal

C. C. Michal, for the past fifteen years, had been one of the extensive contractors in Southern Kansas, though his work had been done in various parts of the state. His home and headquarters are at Independence, where he is recognized as one of the substantial citizens. Mr. Michal went to the border with the Kansas National Guards, Company K, Second Infantry, as a sergeant and served three months. His ancestors came originally from Ireland and were early settlers in the United States. They located very early in the nineteenth century in Western Indiana near Terre Hante, where Philip Michal, father of the Independence contractor, was born in 1828. Philip Michal was reared and married in Indiana and lived there as a farmer for many years. From that state he enlisted in 1861 as a member of the Twenty-ninth Indiana Infantry, and was in service until the close of the war. In one engagement he was wounded by a burating shell and never fully recovered from his wounds. However, he participated in some of the greatest battles and campaigns of the war, including Shiloh, Vicksburg, the march to the sea with Sherman, and all the battles of that campaign. Once he was taken prisoner and confined in the notorious Andersonville until exchanged. He was mustered out with the rauk of first sergeant. Some years after the war he left...

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Biography of Allan Arthur Gilbert, M.D.

Dr. Allan Arthur Gilbert, an internist of St. Louis, who in his practice has gained high professional standing, was born in Burrton, Kansas, May 26, 1890, a son of the Rev. H. M. Gilbert, who was born in South Carolina, but was descended from one of the old families of Connecticut of English lineage. The progenitor of the family in the new world was Mathew Gilbert, who came across the Atlantic on the historic Mayflower and was the first deputy governor of Connecticut under King George. Among the ancestors of Dr. Gilbert was also Colonel Ethan Allen, who commanded the famous Green Mountain boys in the Revolutionary war. Rev. H. M. Gilbert was a graduate of Vanderbilt University, attending the Theological Seminary and also was gradauted from Wafford College. He received his Doctor of Divinity degree from Vanderbilt and devoted his entire life to the ministry of the Presbyterian church. He is now a representative of the Presbyterian Board of Ministerial Relief and resides in St. Louis, but has his business headquarters in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He married Clara Elizabeth Fulton, a native of Illinois. Her father was Isaac B. Fulton, a pioneer of that state and also of Kansas and after removing to the west be served as a member of the state legislature of Kansas for a number of terms and was very active in republican politics. He...

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Biography of Charles Sumner Newlon, M.D.

Dr. Charles Sumner Newlon, who for the past fifteen years has engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in Kansas City, Missouri, and who for many years prior to this period was a physician and surgeon of the state of Kansas, was born at Newton’s Grove, Cass county, Iowa, in 1858, a son of Dr. William Smithson and Maria (Wimp) Newlon. The ancestral line is traced back to his great-grandfather, John Newlon. The grandfather, Hiram Newlon, was born in Virginia and was a cousin of Dolly Madison, wife of the fourth president of the United States and also a relative of Mrs. Patrick Henry. The wife of Hiram Newlon was Margaret Field, of Kentucky, a cousin of Governor Shortridge, of Alabama, also of Wade Hampton and of Judge Field, of Louisiana. Dr. W. S. Newton, father of Dr. Charles S. Newlon, was also a prominent physician of the west. He collected the indigenous plants of southern Kansas for the Centennial Exposition and made many geological surveys in Kansas, Oklahoma and Missouri, contributing valuable collections to Washburn College and the Smithsonian Institute. In 1882 he investigated and wrote articles upon the screw fly. About this time he contended through the medical press that consumption and some ten or twelve other diseases were caused by germs. He discovered five or six fossil cephalopods, a crawfish and several insects new to...

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Biographical Sketch of Albert Lehman Southworth

Albert Lehman Southworth, living retired at Longview, represents one of the old and substantial families of Champaign County, his people having located here more than sixty years ago and having played worthy and active parts in the development and transformation of Raymond Township. Mr. Southworth was born in Erie County, Ohio, August 14, 1850, son of John Randolph and Anna (Akers) Southworth. His father was a Connecticut man by birth while his mother was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. It was in 1855 that the family came to Champaign County and settled on a tract of raw and unimproved land in section 29, Raymond Township. The father lived there and cultivated the soil until his death in 1885, while the mother passed away in 1893. They were the parents of six children: Mary Adelaide, widow of Martin B. Reed, living in Colorado; Julia Ann, deceased; Horace Franklin, deceased; Albert L.; John J., of Danville, Illinois; and May Lilly, wife of James Watts, of Fairland. Albert L. Southworth has had an active career, was reared on the home farm in Raymond Township, attended the local schools, and at the age of twenty-three left home and went to Parsons, Kansas, where he lived on a farm for seven years. His next experience was near Soda Springs, Colorado, where he spent three years as a miner. On returning to Champaign County he...

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Biography of John Child Maxson, M. D.

John Child Maxson, M. D. For over twenty-four years Doctor Maxson had practiced his profession in Kansas and is now located at Corning, where as a physician and surgeon of thorough attainments he had an extensive practice. His family were early settlers in Sonthern and Southeastern Kansas. Doctor Maxson is in the tenth generation from the immigrant of the family from England to the American colonies. The founder of the Maxson family in this country was Richard Maxson. Doctor Maxson’s grandfather, James Maxson, spent his life as a farmer in Alleghany County, New York. James S. Maxson, father of Doctor Maxson, was born in Alleghany County, New York, in 1823. He grew up there, and when a young man went to Wisconsin, where he married. For some years he taught school both in Kentucky and Wisconsin. In the fall of 1873 he moved to Lyon County, Kansas, and was one of the early settlers there. By trade he was a painter, and he combined that occupation with farming until 1880, when he removed to Coffey County for three years and then for ten years lived at Parsons in Labette County and finally located at Erie in Neosho County. Late in life he retired to Kelly, Kansas, and died there in 1905, Twice during the Civil war he tried to get enrolled in the Union army, but was rejected on...

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Biography of Julius S. Waters

A distinguished jurist has said: “In the American state the great and good lawyer must always be prominent, for he is one of the forces that move and control society. Public confidence has generally been reposed in the legal profession. It has ever been the defender of popular rights, the champion of freedom regulated by law, the firm support of good government. In the times of danger it has stood like a rock and breasted the mad passions of the hour and finally resisted tumult and faction.” A review of the history of Julius Spencer Waters shows that his life is largely an exemplification of this statement; that as an individual he has shared in the work thus attributed to the class, and through many years has labored for the good of the nation, advocating every measure intended to advance the welfare, prosperity and happiness of his people. His ancestors were among those who fought for American independence, his grandfather, Walter Waters, and his brothers all serving in the colonial army. His father, William Waters, was born in Monroe County, New York, in 1795, and was a soldier in the war of 18 12, participating in tire battle of Lundy’s Lane under General Scott. He was one of the pioneers of the western reserve of Ohio, locating in Ashtabula County. In 1837 he removed with his family from Ohio...

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Biography of John P. Slaughter

John P. Slaughter. One of the largest and best known financial houses in Kansas is the Farm Mortgage Company, which to a large degree represents the personality and the financial judgment of John P. Slaughter, who is its president. The Farm Mortgage Company, which deals almost entirely in farm mortgages, is an institution occupying a large building of its own at Topeka, and its business also extends to Oklahoma and elsewhere, there being a branch office at Hobart, Oklahoma. The company is capitalized at $100,000 and its chief officers are: J. P. Slaughter, president; W. A. Smith, vice president and treasurer; H. L. Winter, vice president; Russell E. Frost, secretary; and Ray W. Palmatier, cashier. The experience of John P. Slaughter in the farm mortgage business began almost coincidentally with his coming to Kansas. He arrived in Kansas with other members of the family in 1881, when he was sixteen. In the meantime he had attended the public schools and finished his education in Baker University. At the age of sixteen he became a clerk in the office of his uncle, Col. J. B. Cook, at Chetopa, who was then engaged in handling farm mortgages. With that financier he had a working experience of eight years, and was then qualified for a broader participation in banking and business affairs. While continuing his education in Baker University he served as...

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Biography of William P. Bowen

William P. Bowen. For thirty years or more the name Bowen has been extensively associated with milling industries in Southern Kansas. William P. Bowen owns the only flour and feed milling enterprise at Independence, and this was established by himself and his father a great many years ago in connection with several other mills of the same kind located in other parts of the state. Mr. Bowen is not only a business man but a citizen well known throughout Montgomery County. He has filled the post of mayor of his home city, and has done much to advance community welfare. He is descended from Welsh ancestors. Three brothers of the name came from Wales to the United States prior to the Revolutionary war. The one from whom he is descended located in Ohio after that war, and the other two located, according to the best information, in Virginia, and one in New York State. William P. Bowen was born at Ottumwa, Iowa, August 31, 1855. His father was the late George W. Bowen, who died at Independence, Kansas, in 1912. He was born in Ohio in 1829, was reared largely in Indiana, and became an early settler at Ottumwa, Iowa, where he married the mother of William P. Bowen. While still a resident of Ottumwa he made his first business undertaking in Kansas in 1869, establishing a mill at...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas Tweedy

Thomas Tweedy, attorney-at-law, was born in Indiana, September 12, 1853; came to Jewell County, Kan., in 1878; studied law at Red Cloud, Neb., also at Oswego, Kan., and was admitted to practice at Verne, Jennings Co., Ind., June 19, 1881. He is the only practicing attorney in Burr Oak. Attended college at Lancaster, Ind. He was married in Burr Oak, September 12, 1882, to Miss Ella M....

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