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Location: La Porte County IN

Biography of Thomas Smith

THOMAS SMITH. – Mr. Smith, whose life labors have had as their result in one particular the upbuilding of the handsome village of Winchester, near the Umpqua River, was born in Oxfordshire, England, February 12, 1823; and he crossed the Atlantic with his parents in 1830. The first American home was at Rochester, and a year later at Euclid near Cleveland, Ohio; and in 1834 a removal was made to La Porte County, Indiana. Thirteen years were spent in Indiana with his parents; but in 1847 the desire to go forth and test his powers in competition with others induced him in company with a younger brother to come West. He made the six month’s journey as a teamster, armed with his rifle and equipped with an ox-whip. Many and varied were the scenes and incidents of the trip; and the usual hardships common to the most of the pioneers who came “the plains across” were suffered and endured. Not the least exciting of these were the fording of the numerous deep and swift mountain streams. Vast herds of buffaloes occasionally broke through the train; and continual rumors of Indian outrages, combined with oft-recurring pursuit of the savages for stolen stock, rendered the journey anything but monotonous. Only once was pursuit successful, – securing both stock and Indians. At other times they were glad to get themselves back safely....

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Biographical Sketch of William Nicholas Hailmann

Hailmann, William Nicholas; educator; born, Glaris, Switzerland, Oct. 20, 1836; son of William Alexander and Babette Hailmann; educated, Gymnasium, Zurich, and with tutor; studied in Medical College, Louisville, Ky., 1855-1856; (hon. A. M. University of Louisville, 1864; Ph. D., Ohio University, 1885); married Eudora Lucas, of Louisville, Dec. 24, 1857 (died 1904); 2d Helena Kuhn, of Detroit, Dec. 25, 1907; teacher of natural sciences, Louisville High Schools, 1856-1865; director German and English Academy, Louisville, 1865-1973; director German and English Academy, Milwaukee, 1873-1878; director German-American Seminary, Detroit, 1878-1883; supt. public schools, La Porte, Ind., 1883-1894; nat. supt. of Indian schools, 1894-8; supt. of instruction, Dayton, O., 1898; head dept. psychology, Chicago Normal School, 1904-1908; prof. history of education, Cleveland Normal Training School since Sept. 7, 1909. Author: Outlines of a System of Object Teaching, 1866; History of Pedagogy, 1870; Kindergarten Culture, 1872; Letters to a Mother, 1876; Early Education, 1878; Primary Helps, 1884; Primary Methods, 1887; Application of Psychology to Teaching, 1887; Froebel’s Education of Man, 1890; Constructive Form-Work, 1901; The English Language, 1902; The Laurel Primer, 1903; etc. Editor: Erzichungsblatter, 1870-1883; Kindergarten Messenger and New Education,...

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Biography of Robert Paris Harrison

Robert Paris Harrison, city manager of Muskogee, was born June 6, 1867, at Oakwood, Illinois, and is a son of W. C. and Nancy (Graybill) Harrison, who were farming people of that state. He acquired his education in the public schools of his native town and in the district schools near Ladoga, Indiana, and starting out in life on his own account, he became identified, with newspaper interests as a reporter on the Lebanon (Ind.) Pioneer. He was afterward associated with the Michigan City (Ind.) Dispatch and in time became city editor of the Chicago Daily Globe. At a later period he published for seven years the Evening Commercial at Danville, Illinois. Mr. Harrison dates his residence in Muskogee, then a city of the Creek Nation in the Indian Territory, from July 1, 1902, at which time he was made clerk of the United States district court. His service in that position was thoroughly satisfactory, as indicated by the fact of his reappointment by three different federal judges. While thus engaged, he took up the study of law and was admitted to the bar in 1903. He continued to act as United States district court clerk until 1920, when he resigned to become city manager of Muskogee, the duties of the position now claiming his entire attention. He is a director of the Commercial National Bank and has been...

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Biography of Bert Edward Nussbaum

Muskogee has every reason to be proud of her bench and bar. The representatives thereof have, on the whole, been men of high character and of marked capability in the field of their chosen profession. In a calling where advancement depends entirely upon individual merit and ability Bert Edward Nussbaum has made for himself a creditable position and by reason of this his life’s story is an interesting one. He was born in La Porte, Indiana, February 16, 1875, and is a son of L. and Bettie (Fleishel) Nussbaum. The father was a merchant who long conducted a saddlery hardware business and thus provided for the support of the members of his household. Bert E. Nussbaum enjoyed excellent educational opportunities, supplementing a course in the University of Notre Dame in Indiana by further study in the University of Michigan. It was in the latter institution that he pursued his law course Sand was admitted to practice at the Michigan bar in 1896. Three years later he removed to Chicago, where he opened a law office, this being his initial step in the field of his profession, for following his graduation he had gone abroad and had traveled quite extensively in Europe on account of ill health. He dates his residence in Muskogee from 1907 and through the intervening period of fourteen years has continued in general practice. He thoroughly...

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Nichols, A. W. – Obituary

The Waverly (Kansas) Gazette of August 22 contains this announcement of the death of A.W. Nichols, a former respected citizen of Union. A.W. Nichols died Saturday afternoon, August 16, 1913, from appendicitis. He had been operated on for appendicitis a few days previously for the removal of the diseased appendix, but when the incision was made it was found the appendix had ruptured and the puss had entered the abdominal cavity, where it caused peritonitis, which was the immediate cause of his death. Arthur W. Nichols was the son of Joseph H. and Addie F. Nichols, and was born at La Porte, Indiana, Aug. 29, 1870, and at the time of his death was 42 years, 11 months and 13 days of age. He is survived by his wife, two children aged father and mother, two brothers, G.E. Nichols, of Fields Landing, Calif., and one sister, Mrs. Maud Rodgers, of Green City, Mo. The entire community sympathizes with the bereaved ones. The community has lost a progressive and public-spirited citizen, who was always ready to lend his help to every worthy enterprise. Contributed by: Larry...

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Biographical Sketch of J. D. Cassell

J. D. Cassell, proprietor Cassell’s Restaurant, Mattoon; was born in Montgomery Co., Penn., A. D. 1827; until he was 17 or 18 years of age, he passed his life upon the farm, deriving his education mostly from the common schools; in 1854, he came West to Jennings Co., Ind., where he remained one year; he then went to Crawfordsville, Ind., and was a student in Wabash College a short time; he next engaged in the merchant tailoring business there for two or three years; leaving Crawfordsville, he next located in South Bend, remaining one year; in the fall of 1859, he moved to New Carlisle, Ind., and engaged in teaching school; here he remained three and one-half years, most of the time engaged as a Professor in the Collegiate Institute; in the spring of 1863, he moved to Rolling Prairie, taught one year, and, in the fall of 1864, engaged in the grocery trade; in the spring of 1866, he was appointed and commissioned Postmaster, which position he held eight years; in the fall of 1874, he came to Mattoon and engaged in his present occupation. He was first married in 1858, to Elizabeth France, a native of Ohio; she died, in 1868. His second marriage occurred in 1369, to Nancy J. Bolster of New York State; she died in 1870; he has four children – Annie B., Lydia...

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Biography of J. W. McCarty

J.W. McCARTY. – Mr. McCarty, whose phenomenal success as a hop-grower in the Puyallup valley is well known, was born in La Porte county, Indiana, in 1833, and lived with his parents until 1852. As a young man of ambition and sterling qualities, he, in that year crossed the plains to Oregon in company with George Belshaw, now of Lane county, Oregon, and his two brothers. With his brothers he went to Puget Sound in October, 1853, assisting himself to the beginnings of a fortune by working in logging camps and in the sawmills. In 1854 he secured the claim on the Puyallup which he has since so highly improved, and which he owns at the present time. In 1855 he was married to Miss Ruth J., daughter of William M. Kincaid, a pioneer whose biographical sketch appears in this work. The outbreak of the Indians in the October of the following, which resulted in the massacre of McAllister, Miles and Connell at Connell swamp, compelled Mr. McCarty to seek refuge at Fort Steilacoom; and, leaving his young wife there, he joined Captain John Cassen’s company of rangers, with whom he served three months. He suffered the loss of his house and barn, of all his crops, and most of his stock. After the war was over, he returned with fresh energy to his farm and began its systematic...

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