Location: Kings County NY

Candage Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

James Candage was the son of James and Elizabeth Candage, who settled upon the Neck in 1766 from Beverly, Mass., born May 9, 1753; married Hannah, daughter of John Roundy, April 13, 1775; she was born at Beverly, August 4, 1753; died March 12, 1851, aged 97 years, 7 months, 8 days; he died Jan. 12, 1819, aged 65 years and 8 months. Their children were: Elizabeth, Samuel, Gideon, Sarah, James, Azor and John.

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Biographical Sketch of Frank L. Eksward

Frank L. Eksward, the Secretary Manager of the San Mateo County Development Association, has taken a leading part in the recent development of the county. Many of the notable promotion projects of this community have been successfully launched and carried to a satisfactory conclusion under his leadership and co-operation. Mr. Eksward was born in Brooklyn, New York. in 1870. He has traveled all over the United States and visited portions of Alaska and the Pacific Northwest. He has been identified with San Mateo County for the last seven years, five of which he has been engaged actively in promotion work. He is an enthusiastic worker for general county development and particularly for good roads. His only hobby is the up-building of San Mateo County. Mr. Eksward spent much of his time before he became definitely interested in development and community publicity in law work in various eastern...

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Biography of Frank H. Chapman

Frank H. Chapman, a leading druggist of Franklin Falls, was born in Lowell, Mass., May 29, 1848, son of Eben L. Chapman, of New Market, N.H. The father, who was born in 1807, removed to Lawrence, Mass., and was there a successful grocer for forty-one years, retiring from active business in 1860. He married for his first wife a Towle, of New Market, who died leaving no children. For his second wife he married Mrs. Martha J. Hilton Hanscomb, and their children were: Frank H., the subject of this sketch; and Charles, who died at the age of six years. Frank H. Chapman received his education in the common and high schools of Lawrence, Mass. In 1864 he entered the employ of H. M. Whitney, a druggist, to learn the business, remaining there for five years. Afterward, in Brooklyn, N.Y., he was employed in the store of Emil Heydenreich & Co. for three years. In 1875 he came to Franklin Falls, and purchased the drug store of E. H. Sturtevant, whom he succeeded in the business, continuing alone until 1893, when he sold one-half interest to Charles Eddy. The store is now carried on under the style of F. H. Chapman & Co. They have a full line of drugs, medicines, etc., and have succeeded in building up a large and successful business. Mr. Chapman now leaves the entire...

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Biographical Sketch of Albert H. Horton, Judge

Judge Albert H. Horton was identified with the State of Kansas for a period of more than fifty years in the most important phases of its civil and judicial development. His great influence extended from the year of its birth in 1861 to the time of his own death in 1902. For nearly twenty years of that period he served as chief justice of its Supreme Court. Judge Horton was born near Brookfield, New York, March 12, 1837, his ancestors being of an anceient English family, the first American representatives of which settled in New England. Albert received his preparatory education in New York and in 1855 entered the law departmont of the University of Michigan, but during his sophomore year was compelled to leave college because of an affection of his eyes. He was admitted to the bar at Brooklyn, New York, in 1860, and the same year moved to Atchison, Kansas, where he was soon appointed city attorney-In April, 1861, he was elected to that office on the republican ticket, and in September Governor Robinson appointed him judge of the Second Judicial District. Later he was elected to the position twice without opposition, but resigned to resume his law practlce. From 1861 to 1864 he was a member of the editorial staff of the Atchison Weekly Champion. In 1868 he was a republican presidential elector and in...

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Will of Cornelius Beackman – 1668

CORNELIS BEACKMAN, New Utrecht. “Being sicke in his bed, disposes his estate as follows.” First, he, the said Cornelis Beackman, and his wife Marihe Cornelis “do break and anull their first Contract of Marriage,” and do declare that of all they have in this world the said wife shall have one half, and his daughter Mellitie the other half. But if his wife should die before the daughter is twelve years of age, “which God forbid,” the testator appoints Lucas Dirckse and John ye Cooper, Jr., to be tutors of said child, they being both inhabitants of New York. Dated March 4, 1668/9. Witnesses, Jan Tommasen Vandyes, Jacob Lieters. This is the mark [X~ of Cornelis Beackman, with his own hand. This is the mark [0] of Marihe Coruelis. Proved April 3,1669. Translated from the Dutch language into English by me, Thomas Lovell. Inventory taken by John Thomasen and Jacob Lieters. Mentions house and 50 acres of land and meadow at Canarsie. Also a list of debts due to the following persons: Lucas Dicksen, Coenraet Ten Eyck, Hendrick Kip, Jr., John Guisberts, Gouvert Lockermans, Mr. Hans, Jan Jansen, Reynier Williamse, Cornelis Clopper, Isaac Bedloe, Laurence Vander Spiegel, Hermanns Wessels, John Tommasen, Rut Joosten. LIBER 1-2, page...

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Will of Jean Le Telier – 1671

Whereas JEAN LE TELIER, of New Utrecht, in the West Riding of Yorkshire, did by his will leave his wife Christina sole executrix. She is confirmed as such, September 12, 1671. LIBER 1-2, page...

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Will of Charles Morgan – 1668

CHARLES MORGAN, Gravesend. Makes wife Katharine sole executrix. Leaves to son Charles the lot or Plantations recorded to him in the Towne Books of Gravesend. To my other three sons, Thomas, John, and Daniel, the land and Plantation I now live on, and the barn that was formerly Slynihah Loras. His wife is to have the use of the said premises, “to dwell in soe long as shee shall keepe herself a widow. All this is my mynde and will soe to be.” Mentions daughters Mary, Rachel, and Susannah. Dated “Thirteenth day of 7th month 1668.” Witness Wm. Goulding, Sam’l Spicer. Proved Oct. 7, 1668. Inventory mentions a very large number of articles of domestic use, and 6 acres of wheat, 5 acres Corn, 4 acres Oats, 2 acres Rye, 7 acres Peas. LIBER 1-2, page...

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Slave Narrative of Margaret E. Dickens

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Margaret E. Dickens Location: Raleigh, North Carolina (1115 E. Lenoir St.) Date of Birth: June 5th, 1861 My name is Margaret E. Dickens and I was born on the 5th of June 1861. My mother wuz free born; her name wuz Mary Ann Hews, but my mother wuz colored. I don’t remember anything about Marster and Missus. My father was named Henry Byrd. Here is some of father’s writing. My mother’s father was dark. He had no protection. If he did any work for a white man and the white man didn’t like it, he could take him up and whup him. My father was like a stray dog. My name was Margaret E. Byrd before I got married. Here is some of father’s writing–“Margaret Elvira Byrd the daughter of Henry and Mary Ann Byrd was born on the 5th June 1861.” My grandfather, my mother’s father was a cabinet maker. He made coffins and tables and furniture. If he made one, and it didn’t suit the man he would beat him and kick him around and let him go. Dis was told to me. My father was a carpenter. He built houses. I can read and write. My father could read and write. My mother could read, but couldn’t write very much. I have heerd my mother say when she heerd the...

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Biographical Sketch of William Parks

One of the oldest pioneers of Malheur County and a man of excellent capabilities, being possessed of practical ability and judgment, and a keen discrimination that have made him a very successful business man and one of the leaders in the realm of finance in this section, the subject of this article is abundantly worthy of recognition and especial mention among the prominent men of Malheur County and this portion of Oregon, being also a man of worth and personal virtues. Mr. Parks was born in Brooklyn, New York, on June 7, 1845, being the son of Abraham and Jane Eliza (Vanderhoof) Parks. He was deprived of his mother when an infant but received his education and grew to manhood in his native place. It was in 1859 that he crossed the plains to California, locating in Eldorado County where he engaged in farming until 1864. Then he came to Silver City, Idaho and there took up mining until 1871, when he made his way to Jordan valley, now in Malheur County. He at once took a homestead and gave his attention to farming and stock raising. He was successful in that line and now he owns four hundred acres of fine, well improved and irrigated land adjoining the town of Jordan Valley. He has fine buildings and a large hand of cattle. In 1895 Mr. Parks engaged in...

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Biography of Charles May

When the roll of the pioneers of Boise, Idaho, is called the name which heads this sketch will be found well to the top. Charles May was born in Berkshire, England, May 17, 1833, and was reared in his native county, learning in his boyhood the business of brick manufacturing and brick-laying, his father, Charles May, having been engaged in that business. Indeed, the family for centuries, or as far back as their history can be traced, were brick-makers in England. The younger Charles May remained in England until 1856, when he came to America, locating first in New York, and he put in the first gas retorts in the Harlem Gas Works. He remained in New York and Brooklyn until the spring of 1857, when he went to Chicago, where he was for a time engaged in contracting, and then he went to St. Louis and New Orleans. He was in Missouri at the time the civil war broke out and about that time he went to Kansas, where he was a resident during the exciting times which marked the history of that state. He built the first brick house in Junction City, Kansas. In May 1862, he started across the plains for the far west, traveling with the regulation wagons, which were drawn by horses or mules. When his party arrived at Fort Laramie they learned that...

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Biography of A. Sidney Chase

A. Sidney Chase. Quite recently, by his own choice, Mr. Chase terminated an official career which had been continuous for twenty-four years in the office of probate judge of Ellsworth County. It was a long and honorable service and when considered in connection with Judge Chase’s well known integrity of character and other successful aceomplishments it stands as a credit to the entire State of Kansas. To a large degree Judge Chase is the architect of his own destiny, but he had that inestimable advantage of good birth and the inheritance that comes from solid and substantial old American stock. It was the same family which in a collateral branch produced the eminent Salmon P. Chase, secretary of the treasury under Lincoln and later Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court Judge Chase’s great-grandfather, John Chase, was a soldier in the provincial wars and also. in the Revolution. The grandfather, Silas Chase, not only fought in the Revolution but also in 1812. Judge Chase was born at Boston, Massachusetts, February 5, 1842, a son of Autumnus S. and Mary A. (Peterson) Chase, both of whom were natives of Massachusetts. Autumnus S. Chase was an officer in the United States Navy and was on duty during the Mexican war. In 1848 he went to California with a ship load of miners’ cabins, ready to put up. He landed in...

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Biographical Sketch of George P. Comey

Comey, George P.; manufacturer; born, Brooklyn, N. Y., April 21, 1858; son of George P. and Clara Dean Comey; educated, Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute and Connecticut Literary Institute, at Suffield, Conn.; married, Hinsdale, Mass., June 29, 1881, Miss Nannie J. Gill; issue, seven children, Clara M., Florence L., George Lawrence, Frederick Harlan, Ralph, Harold and Robert; business career with his father and uncle in New York City, in the manufacture of ladies’ hats and straw goods for two years, came to Cleveland in 1880, and engaged in the same business with J. G. Pettee & Co.; after three years bought Mr. Pettee’s interest, and organized the firm of Comey & Johnson; Mr. Johnson died in 1905, and the firm was re-incorporated; pres. the Comey & Johnson Co., pioneer firm in Cleveland in the manufacture of women’s straw and felt hats, and one of the largest firms of its kind in the U. S.; director The First National Bank; vice pres. The American Artificial Silk Co.; member Union, Euclid and Automobile...

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Biographical Sketch of Horace Arthur Fuller

Fuller, Horace Arthur; manufacturer; born, Cleveland, Sept. 23, 1864; son of Samuel Augustus and Julia Clark Fuller; educated, Cleveland public schools, and one year Western Reserve University; married, Brooklyn, N. Y., April 14, 1886, Alice Tenney Ingersoll; issue, Antionette F., Pierrong and Marian Fuller; began business in January, 1883, with Condit, Fuller & Co.; this was a partnership; about two years later, entered the employ of The Union Rolling Mill Co.; in 1888, as asst. sec’y, in 1891, elected treas. and gen. mngr., and pres. in 1911; vice pres. of The Bourne-Fuller Co. in 1891; pres. since January, 1912; pres. of The Upson Nut Co.; pres. and treas. The Union Rolling Mills Co.; vice pres. and treas. The Bourne Fuller Co.; director Central National Bank, and American Box Co.; member school board in the village of Brattenahl; member Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity, and Union, Country, Mayfield, and Tavern Clubs. Recreations: Golf and...

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Biography of William Elliott Barnhart

William Elliott Barnhart, who has lived in Kansas City, Kansas, since 1887, has held many large responsibilities in connection with transportation lines, both urban and general railway companies, and has also regulated his private affairs so as to give time for much public service to his home city. His personal career has been one of many interesting experiences and achievements and his ancestry is also an appropriate matter of record. Mr. Barnhart was born at Cedar Valley in Wayne County, Ohio, December 8, 1857, a son of Frederick William and Clarisas (Gooding) Barnhart. The paternal ancestry goes back to his great-grandfather Johann Wilhelm Bernhardt. From the German Palatinate, now including chiefly Baden and Rhenish Bavaria, this ancestor emigrated on May 12, 1764, and settled in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. A son of Johann Wilhelm was Philippe Bernhardt, who served as a soldier in the War of 1812. Philippe’s wife was Elizabeth Rice, whose father, Frederick Rice, was a gallant soldier of the War of the Revolution and when he died at Wooster, Ohio, in February, 1848, he was accorded burial with the honors of war. The old family bible of Johann Wilhelm and of Philippe Bernhardt is now in the possession of Mr. Barnhart of Kansas City. About a hundred years ago the family name was changed from Bernhardt to Barnhart so that the spelling and pronunciation might conform. On...

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Biographical Sketch of Rollin Henry White

White, Rollin Henry; automobile mnfr.; son of Thomas H. White and Almira Greenleaf White; educated, Cornell University, ’94, M. E. and E. E.; married, Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 2, 1896, Katharine King; issue, Elizabeth, William King, Rollin Henry, Jr.; member Union, Country, and Chagrin Valley Hunt...

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