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Location: Kemper County MS

North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana

The Indians all over this continent had names, traditions, religions, ceremonies, feasts, prayers, songs, dances all, more or less, with symbolism and allegory, adapted to circumstances, just as all other races of mankind. But the world has become so familiar with the continued and ridiculous publications in regard to everything touching upon that race of people that a universal doubt has long since been created and established as to the possibility of refinement of thought and nobleness of action ever having existed among the North American Indian race, ancient or modern; and so little of truth has also been learned regarding the real and true inner life of that peculiar and seemingly isolated race of mankind, that today only here and there can one be found who, from a lifetime association and intimate acquaintance, is well versed in Indian thought, feeling and character, and able to unfold and record the solution of that imagined mystery known as “The Indian Problem,” since they learned it from the Indians themselves. From the Indians own lips they were taught its elucidation, and only as it could be taught and learned, but never again can be taught and learned. Even as various nations of antiquity of, the eastern continent have left the evidences of their former occupation by the geographical names that still exist, so to have the North American Indians left their...

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Slave Narrative of Sam McAllum

Interviewer: Marjorie Woods Austin Person Interviewed: Sam McAllum Location: Meridian, Mississippi Date of Birth: September 2, 1842 Age: 95 Place of Residence: Meridian, Lauderdale County To those familiar with the history of “Bloody Kemper” as recorded, the following narrative from the lips of an eye-witness will be heresy. But the subject of this autobiography, carrying his ninety-five years more trimly than many a man of sixty, is declared sound of mind as well as of body by the Hector Currie family, prominent in Mississippi, for whom he has worked in a position of great trust and responsibility for fifty years or more. While this old Negro may be mistaken at some points (the universal failing of witnesses), his impressions are certainly not more involved than the welter of local records. Mrs. Currie states that if Sam said he saw a thing happen thus, it may be depended upon that he is telling exactly what he really saw. Sam McAllum, ex-slave, lives in Meridian, Lauderdale County. Sam is five feet three inches tall and weighs 140 pounds. “De firs’ town I ever seen were DeKalb in Kemper County. De Stephenson Plantation where I were born warnt but ’bout thirteen miles north o’ DeKalb. I were born de secon’ o’ September in 1842. My mammy b’longed to de Stephensons an’ my pappy b’longed to Marster Lewis Barnes. His plantation wasn’t so...

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Biography of John W. Bocock

John W. Bocock, a retired business man at Sidney, has had an unusual range of experience varying from that of an old time telegraph operator to a cotton planter and farmer. Much of his active career has been passed in Champaign County but his business acquaintance is widely extended. Mr. Bocock was born near Washington Courthouse in Fayette County, Ohio, December 20, 1849. His parents were Elijah and Louisa (Gregory) Bocock, both natives of Ohio. His father came to Sidney and Champaign County October 12, 1856, and identified himself with the pioneer element in this county as a farmer. He did not live long after coming, his death occurring July 4, 1864, in the village of Sidney. There were four children: Nancy Maria, who died June 3, 1862; Martha Jane, who died October 16, 1864; Belle, widow of J. S. Frantz and living at Danville, Illinois; and John W. John W. Bocock was fifteen years old when his father died. His mother and two sisters being left upon their own resources it was necessary for the only son to put forth his efforts in assisting to support the family. His sister Belle did likewise but Martha Jane was ill and able to do but little. In June, 1866, the mother married Paul Laybourn, of Sidney, and John W. Bocock and his sister went to the new home in that...

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Poole, Elwyn L. – Obituary

Elwyn L. Poole, 85, of Pendleton, died Thursday, Jan. 23, 1986, at Delamarter Care Center. He was born Feb. 21, 1900 in Rio, Miss., the son of Richard and Inez Poole. He attended Emerson Institute of Technology in Washington, D.C., and worked for various agencies of the federal government. When he retired in 1962 he was employed by the General Services Administration as an air conditioning engineer. On March 8, 1924, he married Ethel Alline Bound of Bailey, Miss. They lived in the District of Columbia, Arlington, Va., Walla Walla and Phoenix, Ariz. Poole came to Pendleton in 1977 to be near his daughter, Merle (Mrs. Robert) Blanc. His first wife died in 1978 and on April 22, 1982, he married Fannie Molstrom at Camlu Retirement Apartments, Pendleton. Survivors include his wife in Pendleton; son, Alfred of Kent, Wash.; daughter, Merle Blanc of Pendleton; stepdaughter Betty Wiginton of San Francisco, Calif.; seven grandchildren, nine great grandchildren, and two step-grandchildren. A son, Edward, and a grandson, Frederick Elwyn Poole, died earlier. Recitation of the rosary will be Sunday, 7:30 p.m. in the chapel at Burns Mortuary, Pendleton. A graveside service will be held Monday, 10 a.,. at the Mountain View Cemetery in Walla Walla. Contributions may be made to the St. Anthony Hospital Auxiliary or to a charity of donor’s choice. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Choctaw Indians

Choctaw Tribe: Meaning unknown, though Halbert (1901) has suggested that they received their name from Pearl River, “Hachha”. Also called: Ani’-Tsa’ta, Cherokee name. Flat Heads, from their custom of flattening the heads of infants. Henne’sb, Arapaho name. Nabuggindebaig, probably the Chippewa name for this tribe, signifying “flat heads.” Pans falaya, “Long Hairs,” given by Adair. Sanakfwa, Cheyenne name, meaning “feathers sticking up above the ears.” Té-qta, Quapaw name. Tca-qtr£ an-ya-df, or Tea-qti ham-ya, Biloxi name. Tca-t a, Kansa name. Tetes Plates, French equivalent of “Flat Heads.” Tsah-tfl, Creek name. Choctaw Connections. This was the largest tribe belonging to the southern Muskhogean branch. Linguistically, but not physically, it was most closely allied with the Chickasaw and after them with the Alabama. Choctaw Location. Nearly all of the Choctaw towns were in the southeastern part of Mississippi though they controlled the adjoining territory in the present State of Alabama. The small tribes of Mobile were sometimes called Choctaw. (See also Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma, Alabama, and Arkansas.) Choctaw Villages From the earliest times of which we have any knowledge the Choctaw villages were distributed into three divisions: a southern, a northeastern, and a western, though a central group may also be distinguished. The southern division is fairly well defined by our several informants, but there is considerable disagreement with reference to the others. One authority gives but two divisions, an eastern and...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Minnie Sleeper

(See Cordery)– Lucile Jackson, born at Tanglewood, country home of her parents, August 7, educated in the public schools and Female Seminary. Married June 27, 1894, Gideon Daniels Sleeper, born October 5, in Liberty, Miss. He died August 7, 1916. They are parents of the following children: Julia Virginia, born April 22, 1895; Gideon Daniels, born June 10, 1897; Walter Jackson, born March 17, 1899; Martha Elizabeth, born January 19, 1901, married A. J. Rawlins; Minnie Louisa, born August 23, 1906. Gideon Daniels Sleeper Sr. was appointed Commissioner in 1909 and elected to the same office in 1910-12. Martha Elizabeth Harris an eighth blood Cherokee of the Blind Savannah Clan was born January 31, 1844 in Georgia. She married in November 1862 William Jackson, born May 4, 1835 in Mortonhamstead, Devonshire, England. He was Captain of Company B Scantling’s Squadron, Texas Confederate Cavalry. He was elected a member of the council from Cooweescowee District on August 5, 1889. Mrs. Jackson died March 17, 1902 and Captain Jackson died March 2, 1911. They were the parents of Walter Hampton, Andrew and Minnie Lucile Jackson the subject of this sketch. Mrs. Sleeper is in the fifth generation from Thomas Cordery, who married Susannah, a full blood Cherokee of the Blind Savannah Clan. The first known Cordery was Souchville-Cordery who came across from Normandy to England with William, The Conqueror in...

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