Location: Kansas City Missouri

Hawes Family of Wrentham, MA

For generations, since the early Colonial period, the Hawes family has been resident in Wrentham, Mass. The line is traced back to Edward Hawes, of Dedham, Mass., born probably about 1620, who died in 1686. He married April 15, 1648, Eliony Lombard. This genealogy discusses the line from Edward through Oliver Snow Hawes who removed to Fall River Mass. It then discusses the family and descendants of Olvier Snow Hawes who resided in the vicinity of Fall River.

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Biographical Sketch of George Washington Schaffer

The subject of this sketch,¬†George Washington Schaffer, was born in St. Louis, Missouri, July 4, 1847. His parents removed, during his boyhood, to Galesburg, Illinois, where they resided several years. Returning to St. Louis, Mr. Schaffer engaged in the butcher business, and continued there until the fall of 1868. His next field of operation was Kansas City, where he followed his trade for some time. From Kansas City he went to St. Joseph, where he remained until 1874, and then returned to St. Louis. He lived in St. Louis one year, during which time he had a rib broken while separating some unruly cattle. The butchers association, to which he belonged, then sent him out with Cole’s Lightning-rod Company, and he traveled with them in Kansas. After another trial of the butcher’s business in Kansas City, he went to Chicago in the fall of 1875 and remained there one year in the employ of Fowler Brothers. From Chicago he proceeded to Atchison, Kansas, and thence again to St. Joseph. On first coming to Daviess county, he stopped in Gallatin, but moved out to Jamesport in the spring of 1880, and again began butchering beef for the hungry. He is one of the firm in the meat-market business of Dinsmore & Schaffer, and is also senior member of the firm of Schafer & Parks, confectioners and restaurateurs. He is a...

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Biographical Sketch of Lawson Drury

Lawson Drury was a native of Worcester Co., Mass., but removed to New Hampshire, where he married Elizabeth Johnson. Their children were Lawson, Jr., Charles, and Ruth. His first wife died, and he was married the second time. His children by his second wife were George, John, James, and Sarah. Mr. Drury removed from New Hampshire to Ohio, where he became Judge of the County Court for the County in which he lived. After the death of his second wife he came to Missouri and lived with his son Charles, at Danville, where he died in July, 1835, in his 65th year. Charles Drury came to Missouri at a very early date, and was the second merchant in Montgomery County, Daniel Robinson being the first. Drury’s first store was at Loutre Lick, but in 1834 he removed to Danville. He was an honest, enterprising man, and was highly esteemed by all who knew him. He married Sally A. Wiseman, of Boone County, who was a daughter of James Wiseman and Mary Tuttle. Their children were-Lawson, James H., Susan B., Charles J., Jarrett, Joseph, Andrew M., Richard B., Nary E., and Elizabeth. Mr. Drury died in Danville in 1848, in his 47th year. Five of his children, James H., Jarrett, Joseph, Andrew H., and Elizabeth, died unmarried. Lawson was married twice; first to Margaret Frazier, and second to Catharine Nilson....

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Biography of John Davis

John Davis, of Jonesburg, familiarly known as “Uncle John,” is the oldest son of the late Thomas Davis, of Shenandoah Co., Va. John was born October 30, 1791, in Shenandoah County, and is now nearly 85 years of age. When he was about sixteen his parents removed to Bourbon Co., Ky., and when the war of 1812 began, he enlisted in the army and served under Generals Winchester and Payne. He was stationed at Forts Wayne and Laramie, in Ohio, for some time. In 1820 he came to Missouri, and stopped a short time in St. Louis, which then had only one principal street, and most of the houses were made of square posts set upright, with the spaces between filled with straw and mud, the chimneys being built of the same material. The court house was surrounded by a post-and-rail fence, and young Davis was sitting on this fence when the announcement was made that the Territory of Missouri had become a State. From St. Louis Mr. Davis went to Pike County, and settled in Clarksville, where he lived forty-six years. In those days rattlesnakes were much more abundant than they are now, and the old pioneers would occasionally go on “snaking” frolics. They always came back vomiting from the effects of the poisonous smell of the snakes. On one occasion Mr. Davis and his neighbors went to...

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Biographical Sketch of Rev. Thomas Johnson

Rev. Thomas Johnson, for twenty-six years a missionary among the Shawnee and other Indian tribes of Kansas and one of the prominent characters in American Methodism of his day, was born in Virginia, July 11, 1802. When comparatively young he came to Missouri and in 1826 entered the Methodist ministry. His first charge was at Mount Prairie, Arkansas, and in 1828, having been received into full connection, he was appointed to Fishing River. In 1830 he was appointed to the Shawnee mission, which was in the Missouri district, and served as its super-intendent until 1841, when he resigned on account of failing health. Having regained his health by medical treatment and a period of relaxation, in the fall of 1847 he was reappointed to the manual-labor school, serving thus until the establishment was discontinued in 1862. Mr. Johnson had already made quite a name in the politics of the day. As early as 1853 he had been elected, by Indian votes, as a delegate to Congress of the territorial government projected for Kansas and Nebraska, but as it was never organized he was, of course, not received, although he went to Washington for the purpose. In March, 1855, he had been elected to the Kansas Territorial Council on the pro-slavery ticket, and his son, twenty-three years of age, was returned to the lower house as its youngest member. Although...

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Biography of Joseph G. Waters, Capt.

Joseph G. Waters, soldier, publicist, author of note, public speaker, lawyer, of Topeka, is an individuality out of the ordinary. As a soldier, his services were a credit to his country, and himself, and his five wounds received in action are witnesses of his activity. As an author his published utterances have been rarely seen outside his own family circle owing to the retiemce and innate modesty of the writer, but throughout his writings, whether prose or poetry, forcefulness, pleasing diction and pathos of high order predominated. For three decades his services have been in demand as a public speaker covering a wide variety of subjects and including patriotic political, economic and social questions. On the occasion of Queen Vietoria’s jubilee, he delivered the address in Topeka before those of English nativity or descent, and this was so highly esteemed by her majesty as to be one of six, out of thousands, to be selected as especially pleasing to the queen and worthy of being engrossed and placed in the English archives. For this Captain Waters received a grateful letter of thanks inspired by her majesty. For nearly half a century he had been one of the leading lawyers of Kansas and although past the three-score-and-ten years of life, he continues to be a conspicuous figure in the legals affairs of the state. Captain Joseph G. Waters was born...

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Biography of Herbert G. Tureman, M. D.

Dr. Herbert G. Tureman one of the most prominent physicians of Kansas City, enjoying a large practice, specializes on the treatment of diseases of the ear, nose, throat and chest. He has made steady progress in his profession and holds to the highest standards in his practice at all times. Missouri numbers him among her native sons for his birth occurred in Callaway county, January 17, 1875, his parents being Robert W. and Sally (Flood) Tureman, who were also natives of Callaway county. The father has devoted his life to financial interests and was an officer of the First National Bank of Mexico, Missouri, whence he removed to Kansas City where he has successfully engaged in banking and real estate business since 1885. Dr. Tureman attended the Missouri Military Academy, at Mexico, Missouri, and after completing his preliminary education entered the University Medical College from which he was graduated in 1897. He spent two years in the New York hospitals, gaining that broad and valuable experience which can never be secured as quickly as when an interne in a big hospital. He entered upon the general work of his profession but anxious to gain a higher degree of efficiency he went to Berlin, Germany, where in 1902-3 he specialized in the study of diseases of the ear, nose and throat, the last year being first assistant to the famous...

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Biography of A. P. Fonda

A. P. Fonda has made a most creditable record as a farmer, as a lawyer and particularly as a citizen whose devotion to the welfare of the great majority Is a recognized fact. A resident of Independence, he was born in Leavenworth, Kansas, March 30, 1878, his parents being Anthony Philip and Laura D. (Wier) Fonda, the former a native of the state of New York and the latter of New Jersey. His parents became acquainted and were married in Leavenworth, Kansas. The father conducted the first wholesale grocery in Kansas City, which place was then known as Port Fonda. He was a veteran of the Civil war, having served in the Union army, enlisting in Michigan as a member of a regiment of that state. In the course of the war he was captured by his own brother, who was with the Confederate forces. A. P. Fonda acquired his early education in the public schools of Kansas City, Missouri, following the removal of the family from Leavenworth, and later attended the Marmaduke Military Academy at Sweet Springs, Missouri. He next became a student in the Case School of Applied Sciences at Cleveland, Ohio, and afterward attended Union College at Schenectady, New York. About this time the Spanish-American war began and he attempted to join the army but because of some physical defects was refused. He therefore represented the...

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Biography of Sol. E. Waggoner

Sol. E. Waggoner, president of the Masonic Home of St. Louis, has long been a recognized leader in the Masonic fraternity of Missouri and has contributed much to the growth and success of the order in the state. A native of Ohio he was born March 8, 1851, and is justly proud to trace his descent from General Waggoner of Revolutionary war fame who was a resident of Virginia. His father, William Waggoner, lived for some time in Ohio and in 1858 established his home in Macon, Missouri. He was one of only eight in the entire county who supported Abraham Lincoln for the presidency in 1860 and the political antagonism which he thus engendered rendered it so uncomfortable for him that he removed to Iowa in 1861, where he later engaged in the contracting business. He married Malinda Small, a native of Pennsylvania, and she, too, came of Revolutionary war ancestry. Her death occurred in 1874, while William Waggoner long survived his wife and had reached the venerable age of ninety-two years when he passed away in 1902. Reared in Oskaloosa, Iowa, Sol. E. Waggoner there attended the public schools and after leaving the high school became a student in Oskaloosa College, from which he was graduated in due course of time. He was early identified with the Western Union Telegraph Company as circuit manager on the old...

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Biography of Harry Jiencke

For about a quarter of a century Harry Jiencke traveled about over the State of Kansas as a salesman, building up a large acquaintance and business relationship, but for the past twelve years had been prominently identified with the oil and gas and various other industrial affairs of Independence, where he is one of the well known citizens. Of an old German family of Mecklenburg, he came to America when only a youth. He was born May 27, 1858. His father, Joachim Jiencke, was born in Mecklenburg in 1806 and died there in 1869. He was a man of more than ordinary prominence. He had extensive farming and stock raising interests, was a member of the legal profession and held a judicial office, and during his service in the regular army went through the rebellion of 1848. He was a member of the Lutheran Church. His wife, Henrietta Ahrens, was born in Germany in 1818 and died there in venerable years in 1905. To their marriage were born a large family, fifteen children, and a brief record of them is as follows: William, now deceased; Gustav, a confectioner living in Chicago; Mina, who died in infancy; Louisa, still living in Mecklenburg, Germany, the widow of Henry Demin, who was a miller; Fritz, deceased; Karl, deceased; Marie, living in Mecklenburg, the widow of Otto Beutler, who was a confectioner; Panl,...

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Biography of James C. Shimer

Thirty years or association with the coal and feed business at Topeka had established for James C. Shimer a reputation for ability, resource and unflagging industry. He is one of the captains of suscess who have piloted their own craft to harbor. In his numerous varieties of experience, he had gained the good will of his fellow men, had made a place for himself in the business world and had served his county faithfully and well in public office, and out of all his struggles had evolved the belief that hard work rarely injures any one and that straightforward dealing always pays. His father, Caleb D. Shimer was born in Ohio, and as a young man went to Indiana, where he was engaged in the feed business until the Civil war came on. At that time he became keeper of a tollgate on the National Pike, outside of Indianapolis, the last one to be built in the county, and of this he continued keeper until the close of the war. He then returned to the feed business, but four years later purchased a small farm near Bethel, Indiana, which he continued to operate, with the making of candles as a side line, for many years. He died March 20, 1916, at the age of ninety-three years. Mr. Shimer married Ellen Bingham, who was born in Indiana, and they became...

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Biography of Raymond Griffin Barnett

Raymond Griffin Barnett, who had the well earned title of captain of the American army in the World war and who is now engaged in the practice of law in Kansas City, was born at Carthage, Hancock county, Illinois, October 8, 1882, and is a son of Fred P. and Adele (Griffin) Barnett, the former a native of Missouri and the latter of Illinois. The father went from this state to Iowa and afterward returned to Kansas City. He is by profession a court reporter and is now the vice president of the Shorthand Reporting Company, with offices in the Temple building of Kansas City. To him and his wife were born three children but one has passed away, the surviving daughter being Edith Barnett. After completing a course in the Central high school of Kansas City, Raymond G. Barnett attended the University of Missouri and then went to the coast, where he entered the Stanford University of California, winning his Bachelor of Arts degree as a member of the class of 1905. Subsequently he studied law there and in 1906 was admitted to the bar of Kansas City, where he has since engaged in practice. He is thorough in his work, energetic in his tasks and capable in handling the legal business entrusted to his care. His professional career is characterized by the thorough preparation of his cases...

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Biography of John W. Perkins, M. D.

Dr. John W. Perkins, division surgeon for the Kansas division of the union Pacific Railroad since 1887 and a physician ‘and surgeon of pronounced ability, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, July 1, 1860, a son of David and Hannah (Dunn) Perkins, who were natives of New Hampshire and of Maine, respectively. The father was contractor and builder who devoted his life to the business following his marriage, previous to which time he had been a sea captain, sailing out of Boston to the West Indies and in the coastwise trade. He came of a family of seagoing people, but after his marriage, preferring to be with his family, he took up building operations in Boston. His son, Dr. John W. Perkins, completed a course in the Boston Latin school and then entered Harvard, in which he completed his classical course by graduation in 1882 with the Bachelor of Arts degree, while in 1886 he won the M. D. degree. He later served as house physician in the Boston Children’s Hospital and was after ward house surgeon for a year and nine months in the Boston City Hospital. On the expiration of that period he was appointed surgeon for the Union Pacific Railway at Kansas City and removed to the middle west in 1887. He has since acted in this capacity, or for a period of more than a third...

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Biography of Lawrence Pembroke Browne

Lawrence Pembroke Browne, father of Evan H., was born in Pennsylvania and his wife in Ohio. He came to Kansas City, Missouri, as a clerk for the firm of Northrop & Chick, one of the few business houses of any importance at that time, and later, in partnership with W. H. Chick, who yet survives, became the owner of the business. In 1884 this business, general merchandise, was incorporated by the Browne family, the Chick interests being then eliminated. Until the time of his death, in 1893, Lawrence Pembroke Browne continued at the head of this business, which was largely in the Mexican trade. The building of the railroads was the influence that caused its stsady progress westward, on through Kansas and Colorado and to Las Vegas, New Mexico, where there is a store at the present but the old business was sold in 1915. Mr. Browne in 1866 located in Junction City and then followed the construction of the Union Pacific Railroad, settling at each tarminal, and later pursnod the same method along the Santa Fo Road. His whole time was given to his business affairs, in which he showed much enterprise. Evan H. Browne attended the schools in his native city and later Wyandotte Academy in Kansas City, Kansas, after which he went to work in the private banking house of Northrop & Son. After one year...

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Biography of Andrew Calvin Sewell

Andrew Calvin Sewell, a younger brother of J. B. Sewell, was born in Overton County, Tennessee, May 30, 1856. He was fifteen when the family came across the country in a prairie schooner to Montgomery County, Kansas, and in the meantime had attended public schools in Tennessee. While living on the farm southwest of Independence he continued his education in the district schools and in the fall of 1876 became a teacher. Preparatory to beginning his work as a teacher he had attended a private school conducted by Professor Morrison of Radical City. In his home district, Harrisonville, he taught a term, then attended the Normal Institute at Independence, and in the fall of 1877 took up his work in the Peebler District. The following spring he returned to the Harrisonville District and taught a term of three months, and then for three years was principal of schools at Elk City. After that he was again in the Harrisonville District, afterwards was principal for a year at Elk City, and then entered the mercantile business at Elk City. In 1898 he moved to Joplin, Missouri, where he was connected with merchandising and also as a prospector and miner for about two years. In 1901, after coming back to Elk City, he secured leases for about 17,000 acres of land in behalf of the Elk City Gas and Oil Company....

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