Location: Junction City Kansas

Biography of Frank T. Vaughan

Frank T. Vaughan, one of the younger lawyers of Newport, was born May 4, 1864, in Woodstock, Vt., son of Edwin and Elizabeth L. (Tenney) Vaughan. The father, who graduated at the Albany Law School, New York, followed the legal profession, and at the time of his death was Judge of Probate. Edwin Vaughan commenced his law practice in New York City; but in 1859 he removed to Claremont, N.H., and entered into partnership with Colonel Alexander Gardner. In 1861 he enlisted in the New Hampshire Battalion of the First Rhode Island Volunteer Cavalry, and was afterward transferred to the First New Hampshire Cavalry, with the rank of Captain. He remained in the service throughout the late war, acting at one time as Provost Marshal. Claremont, and was thereafter engaged in his profession until 1869. In that year he was appointed United States Consul to Canada, a post which he efficiently filled for twelve years. Upon his return to Claremont he was made Judge of Probate, and he afterward served as Representative to the State legislature. He was largely interested in educational matters, was liberal in religion, and he was a member in good standing of the A. F. & A. M. He died December 18, 1890. He and his wife had three children. One died in infancy; and Charles Edwin died at the age of twelve years, from...

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Biography of James Humphrey

James Humphrey, as lawyer, editor, judge and state official, firmly established his position throughout a period of half a century as one of the ablest and most popular citizens of Central Kansas. He was born in Nottinghamshire, England, March 8, 1833; came to New England in 1854, and during the succeeding three years was a resident of Fall River, Massachusetts. There he became interested in the Kansas agitation for free statehood and in April, 1857, reached Manhattan. His first employment in connection with the shrievalty was a good test of his pluck, and he so arose to the occasion that he was afterward elected mayor. In 1859 and 1860 he served as assistant county treasurer and in 1861 was head of the office. He also served as justice of the peace, and his trial of the cases brought before him brought so much commendations from the lawyears of both sides that he decided to study law. He was admitted to the bar in 1863. He has previously broken into journalism by editing the Manhattan Express in the absence of C. F. DeVivaldi, who was serving abroad as consul to Brazil. After the Civil war Mr. Humphrey established a large practice, and handled it with such ability that in the spring of 1867 he was appointed judge of the Eighth Judicial District. In the fall of that year he was...

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Biography of Rev. John A. Anderson

Rev. John A. Anderson, so long identified with the work of the Presbyterian Church at Junction City, and, while a resident of that place, with the affairs of Congress, of which he was a member, had a remarkable experience for a elergyman. He graduated from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, in 1853, Benjamin Harrison being his roommate for a time. Mr. Anderson began his ministerial work at Stockton, California, in 1857, and is said to have preached the first union sermon on the Pacific coast. In 1860 the state legislature of California elected him trustee of the state insane asylum. Two years later he was appointed chaplain of the Third California Infantry, and in that capacity he accompanied General Connor’s expedition to Salt Lake City. As correspondent and agent of the United States Sanitary Commission for California his first duty was to act as relief agent of the Twelfth army corps. He was next transferred to the central office at New York. In 1864, when General Grant began moving toward Richmond, Mr. Anderson was made superintendent of transportation and had charge of six steamboats. At the close of the campaign he served as assistant superintendent of the canvas and supply department at Philadelphia and edited a paper ealled the Sanitary Commission Bulletin. When the war closed he was transterred to the history burean of the commission at Washington, remaining there...

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Biography of Samuel V. Mallory

Samuel V. Mallory, now superintendent of the city schools of Morrill, Brown County, had been a, Kansas educator for many years. He had been connected at different times with the public schools of three states–Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma–and both as a teacher and administrator his work rests upon the seeure foundation of sincere and effective service. Mr. Mallory had lived in Kansas since early youth and he represents some of the best elements of American ancestry. His great-grandfather, John William Mallory, spent his life in Virginia, having been born near Harper’s Ferry. He married Elizabeth peyton, who was the daughter of an officer in the Revolutionary war. Mr. Mallory’s grandfsther was Valentine Roger Mallory, who was born at Harper’s Ferry in Virginia in 1797, and moved from that state to Sangamon County, Illinois, near the capital at Springfield, and was an early farmer in that district. He died at Springfield in 1866. His wife was Nancy Dawson, a native of Kentucky. Several generations of the family were represented in and around Springfield, Illinois, and it was in that city that Samuel V. Mallory was born April 16, 1856. His father is the venerable R. U. Mallory, who was born at Springfield in 1828 and is still living, nearly ninety years of age, at Morrill, Kansas. He grew up and married at Springfield, became a farmer, and in 1871 migrated...

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Biography of Charles May

When the roll of the pioneers of Boise, Idaho, is called the name which heads this sketch will be found well to the top. Charles May was born in Berkshire, England, May 17, 1833, and was reared in his native county, learning in his boyhood the business of brick manufacturing and brick-laying, his father, Charles May, having been engaged in that business. Indeed, the family for centuries, or as far back as their history can be traced, were brick-makers in England. The younger Charles May remained in England until 1856, when he came to America, locating first in New York, and he put in the first gas retorts in the Harlem Gas Works. He remained in New York and Brooklyn until the spring of 1857, when he went to Chicago, where he was for a time engaged in contracting, and then he went to St. Louis and New Orleans. He was in Missouri at the time the civil war broke out and about that time he went to Kansas, where he was a resident during the exciting times which marked the history of that state. He built the first brick house in Junction City, Kansas. In May 1862, he started across the plains for the far west, traveling with the regulation wagons, which were drawn by horses or mules. When his party arrived at Fort Laramie they learned that...

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Biography of John Henry Prescott

John Henry Prescott. At the close of the Civil war, in which he had played a gallant role as a Union soldier and had attained the rank of captain, Mr. Prescott came out to Kansas and from that time until his death on July 5, 1891, was a notable figure in the life and affairs of Salina and that part of the state. He attained high rank as a lawyer and as a jurist, and was also remarkably successful in business affairs. His name and memory may well be cherished by his descendants and by the people of the entire state. Captain Prescott was born October 14, 1840, at Pittsfield, New Hampshire. He is of old New England stock, and this branch of the Prescott family goes back in American history to the year 1640. His parents were substantial farming people, John and Mary (Clark) Prescott, both natives of New Hampshire. John Henry Prescott was the second in a family of five children and the oldest of the three sons. His early life was spent on his father’s farm, and he completed his literary education at Pittefield Academy. When sixteen years of age he took up the study of law. He was still equipping himself for this profession when the Civil war broke out. On August 10, 1862, Mr. Prescott enlisted as a private in Company F of the...

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Biography of Edson Baxter

Edson Baxter. Now serving as clerk of the District Court at Marion, Captain Baxter is an old timer of Kansas and had lived in close touch with the developments of half a century and his own part therein allows him to speak with authority on the history of that period. The Baxter family came to Kansas in territorial times and did their pioneering in Morris County. Edson Baxter was fifteen years of age when he accompanied the family caravan overland, and he was able to make himself useful from the very beginning of the settlement. He was born on a farm in Lasalle County, Illinois, October 8, 1842, a son of June and Elizabeth (Lenox) Baxter. He is a descendant of the noted English divine, Richard Baxter. June Baxter, his father, was born near West Point, New York, June 30, 1805. In early life he learned the trade of blacksmith, and from New York went to Illinois. In 1858 he brought his family with wagons and teams westward from Central Illinois and located on land which he pre-empted in Morris County, Kansas. The rest of his active years were spent there as a farmer, and he died May 20, 1890. When the Baxter family settled in Morris County the settlers lived chiefly along the creeks. Law and order were not securely established, and besides some Indian seares the population...

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Biography of Charles H. Trott

Charles H. Trott, who died at his home in Junction City March 2, 1916, attained many of those ideals for which ambitious men will always strive. He proved a gallant and faithful soldier when the country’s integrity was in danger, was a merchant and business man of the finest integrity, was a good friend, a good Christian and a good citizen. For half a century he lived in Kansas, and at the time of his death was one of the oldest if not the oldest business man of Junction City. He arrived in Junction City in the spring of 1866 a veteran soldier and officer of the Union Army. Junction City was then a thriving little town with splendid promise for the future. There were no railroads and Mr. Trott arrived by stage coach. Soon after reaching the town he was appointed postmaster, an office he filled with the systematic regard for his responsibilities which characterized every act of his life. He remained postmaster until 1871. When he went into the office he also bought the book and stationery store which the preceding postmaster had owned. It was as a merchant in books and stationery supplies that Mr. Trott performed his longest business service in Junction City, and only death stayed his hand and interrupted his active participation, the store having since been continued as a service to the...

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Biography of Bertrand Rockwell, Captain

Bertrand Rockwell, who had had his home at Kansas City, Missouri, since 1906 was one of the constructive figures in Kansas from the close of the Civil war until he retired from business. Apart from the individual interest of his career, his activities have had the greatest value in connection with Junction City and that section of the state. Before he had reached his majority he had left school and entered the army, and came out with the rank of captain. Two weeks after being mustered out, in September, 1865, Captain Rockwell reached Leavenworth, Kansas. From there he was carried by one of the Kansas stage line stages to various towns and cities, visiting Lawrence, Topeka, Manhattan, Junction City, and Council Grove. His object was to find a suitable location for business. He finally cast his lot in with beautiful Junction City, then a town of 300 or 400 people. His first task was to erect a frame building 20 by 50 feet. Ten feet at the rear was partitioned off for a sleeping room. He was then unmarried and for several years he lived and worked in one building. The rest of the space he filled up with a stock of groceries and men’s furnishing goods. This frame building gave way to a larger and better structure, and B. Rockwell & Company attained its position among the foremost...

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Biography of Isaac E., Lambert, Sr.

Isaac E. Lambert, Sr., whose tragic death in the burning of the Copeland Hotel at Topeka in 1908 is generally recalled, was in his time one of the most prominent attorneys of Kansas and stood in the forefront of his profession and also as a public leader. His son, Isaac E. Lambert, Jr., is also a lawyer, a resident of Emporia, and is now serving as chief clerk of the Kansas House of Representatives. At the time of his death Isaac E. Lambert, Sr., was fifty-five years of age and in the prime of his powers. He was born in Knoxville, Illinois, in 1853, spent his early youth there, and graduated LL. B. from the Northwestern University Law School at Chicago. He began practice in Peoria, Illinois, where for a time he was in the office of the noted Robert Ingersoll. Coming to Kansas in 1875 he located in Emporia and soon had acquired a reputation and successful general practice. He was especially noted as a criminal lawyer, though for many years his practice was corporation work. The Santa Fe Railroad Company employed him as its attorney with jurisdiction over twenty-two counties from Lyon County to the western limits of the state. He was also attorney for the National Hereford Association and for a number of other associations and corporations. He served at one time as United States district...

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Biography of Christian Hoffman

Christian Hoffman. While Kansas had produced many notable business men, the success of none of them had more perfectly represented the outflowing of integrity of character and a tireless energy and good judgment than that achieved by Christian Hoffman, founder of the City of Enterprise in Dickinson County and the founder and upbuilder of a milling and elevator industry which, until it was merged with other similar enterprises, was one of the largest in the entire State of Kansas. He was a territorial pioneer of Kansas, having arrived at Leavenworth in 1857. During his early years in Kansas he was known as a hard working carpenter and an honest and straightforward young mechanic, and the promise of his large success was hardly appreciated by any of his contemporaries at that date. The first twenty-nine years of his life he spent in his native country of Switzerland. He was born in the canton of St. Gallen August 1, 1826, a son of Lenard and Agatha (Rohrer) Hoffman. After leaving public school he became an apprentice at the age of fifteen in the baker’s trade, and later acquired a thorough knowledge of the milling industry. When he came to the United States in February, 1855, and located at West Bend in Washington County, Wisconsin, the best opening for him was as a carpenter’s helper, and he thoroughly learned the carpenter’s trade...

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Biographical Sketch of Sturm, Henry

Henry Sturm, wholesale and retail dealer in all kinds of liquors. He also has a soda factory, where he manufactures all kinds of soda and mineral water and Champagne cider. The building cost $2000 and is 20×30 feet. He employs four men. He has a warehouse 20×75 foot, where he keeps a stock of Joseph Schlitz Milwaukee Lager Beer. His stock of liquors invoice at $3,000. He also keeps a billiard and saloon parlor. He has two icehouses, respectively 20×30 feet and 30×50 feet, and has 400 tons of ice stored to supply the city. He first came to Junction City, Kan., in government employ, in 1876, and continued some time in that capacity; thence to dodge. He was born in Germany, 1837, and came to America in 1851. He was married in 1878 to Miss Ragena Bug of Cincinnati, Ohio. They have two children, Louisa C. and Bertha. He has been Township Treasurer two terms, and is a member of the I. O. O....

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