Location: Jefferson County WA

Biography of Hon. Charles Eisebeis

This wealthy resident of Port of Washington gained his eminence by sturdy industry and sagacious investment during the pioneer days. He is a native of Prussia, was born in 1832, and the fifth in a family of ten children. Of his father he learned the trade of a baker, and was prepared upon his arrival in America in 1856 to earn thereby, in company with his brother, an independent livelihood at Rochester, New York. In 1858 he came via Panama to San Francisco, and in the fall of the same year arrived at Port Townsend. He here opened a shop and prepared for the market the first baker’s goods in the town, and probably the first in the territory, except at Vancouver. He was under engagement with the firm of Priest & Peterson, becoming a partner within a few months. The site was the same as that now occupied by his present fine building. Two years later he removed to Steilacoom, and after a sojourn of five years at this point, during which he engaged successfully in his former business and in brewing, returned to the city of his first choice, continuing a remunerative management of his shop, and investing his saving in real estate. by this means he has acquired some of the finest property in the city, and at Seattle has been very successful in that line....

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Biography of Alfred A. Plummer, Sr.

ALFRED A. PLUMMER, Sr. – This pioneer of the port of entry was born at Alfred, Maine, March 3, 1822. He was the son of John and Eliza Adams Plummer, of an old family of the Pine Tree state. In early life young Plummer removed to Boston and learned the saddlery and harness trade, thereby acquiring practical ideas, and the facile use of his hands, which fitted him for the varied work of the pioneer on our coat. In 1849 he left for the Pacific shores, coming with the argonauts who steered their way across the seas of grass, and the deserts of the West, – one of those hardy, keen characters that find a world of resources within their own hearts and minds sufficient for any demand to be made upon a human being; and he most fully justified this confidence in his after career. At San Francisco he engaged for a time in the hotel business, but, feeling the drift of destiny still farther up the coast, boarded in 1850 the brig Emory, Captain Balch, and arrived in the Strait April 24th. The present site of the Port was then wholly uninhabited; but, seeing its great natural advantages as the first really practicable landing at the entrance of the Sound waters, he laid there his Donation claim, and with Charles Batchelder became the first settler of the...

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Biography of John F. Sheehan

JOHN F. SHEEHAN. – The gentleman whose name heads this brief memoir, an excellent portrait of whom appears in this history, has been a leading business man and resident of Port Townsend, Washington for almost thirty years. Mr. Sheehan is a native of the Sunny south, and was born in Baltimore Maryland, in 1840. When but an infant he suffered the irreparable loss of his father by death. His widowed mother then, with her two sons, our subject being but eighteen months old, paid a visit to Ireland, and at the end of one year returned to Baltimore. John F. was then taken by an uncle to New Orleans, where he received his education and resided until fifteen years of age. He then started out to do for himself, still being but a mere boy. He started for the Pacific coast, coming via the Nicaragua route, and arrived in San Francisco in the summer of 1856. The first two years in the Golden state were spent in the mines and at different occupations until the breaking out of the ever-memorable Frazer River excitement, when Mr. Sheehan joined the gold-seekers and came north, only to find on arriving at the mines that “All is not gold that glitters,” and also to find that the great excitement which had lured thousands was a humbug. On leaving the mines Mr. Sheehan came...

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Biography of Hon. David Shelton

HON. DAVID SHELTON – Mr. Shelton, one of the very earliest of the pioneers of Washington Territory, who with Mr. L.B. Hastings and F.W. Pettigrove became a founder of Port Townsend, was born in Buncombe County, North Carolina, September 15, 1812. His father, Lewis Shelton, emigrated to the territory of Missouri in the year 1819, and settled in Saline county but kept on the advance wave of settlement, ever moving westward as the state settled up, and died in Andrew county in 1847. In this frontier life young David came to maturity, and on May 30, 1837, was married to Miss Frances Wilson. This was a young lad whose native place was Whitley County, Kentucky, and the date of her birth March 16, 1817. She had moved from Kentucky after the death of her father, David Wilson, with her mother to Missouri in 1829, and in 1835 had settled in Clinton county. After marriage this young couple moved into Buchanan county and settled near St. Joseph in 1838. In 1847, feeling their pioneer blood stirred by reports of the great West and of Oregon they gathered together all their household goods and effects, and on the 9th of May crossed the Missouri river about three miles above St. Joseph on their way to Oregon. They found the journey long and tedious, as it was accomplished wholly by ox-teams; and...

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Biography of James O’Laughlin

JAMES O’LOUGHLIN. – This gentleman, whose portrait adorns the opposite page, is one of the representative men of Skagit County, Washington. He is a native of Ireland, thus making Skagit, as every county in the United States indebted to the emerald Isle. County Clare was the region of his birth; and the time was April 9, 1844. Before he was three years old, his parents crossed the ocean to this land of liberty, bringing their nine children with the. They located at Lyons, New York, but in 1856 went to Lapeer, Michigan. There the boy James learned the tinsmith’s trade. After the completion of his apprenticeship, he clerked in a hardware store nine years. In 1870 he removed to Yankton, Dakota, where he lived one year. In the following year he set forth with his family to cross the continent. Coming to Puget Sound via San Francisco, he made his first pause at Port Townsend in May, 1871. Thence he proceeded to Seattle and in December of that year established himself at La Conner. He worked at his trade there till 1877. Then, having purchased one hundred and sixty-four acres of land near the town, he devoted himself to farming. His neighbors having inveigled him into political life, he was elected in the fall of 1880, to be sheriff and assessor of Whatcom County. At that time, Whatcom included...

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Biographical Sketch of Capt. Henry E. Morgan

CAPT. HENRY E. MORGAN. – This well-known pioneer of 1849 is a native of Groton, Connecticut, and was born October 30, 1825. He moved with his parents to Meriden, in the same state, residing there until April, 1849, when he set forth for California in a bark via Cape Horn, arriving in San Francisco the following September. A short time afterwards he began a sea-faring life, and for fifteen years sailed the ocean. During that time he entered nearly all the noted foreign ports, and later purchased a vessel of his own and followed a coasting trade. In 1858 he located in Port Townsend, Washington territory, and after quitting the sea began to till the soil, and followed farming for six years. In 1863 he was elected representative from Jefferson county, and ably filled that office for two terms. In 1879 he was appointed inspector of hulls for the Puget sound district. He has invested from time to time in real estate in Port Townsend, and is now one of the largest property owners of the city, and after the buffetings of many years is safely anchored in a happy home, esteemed by his acquaintances and honored by the citizens of the town in which he lives. His family consists of a wife and one...

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Biography of Hon. Joseph A. Kuhn

HON. JOSEPH A. KUHN. – Judge Kuhn has long filled a position of such prominence in Washington that the details of his life will be of public interest. His career illustrates once more the fact that the brawn and brain of the East needs but to touch the earth to spring up in double vigor at the West. He is the fourth in a family of six sons, resident in Pennsylvania; and the year of his birth was 1841. His mother belonged to an old American family of large reputation; and his father enjoyed the rank of colonel, and was for two terms judge of his county. At the age of eighteen our subject left home for Calvert College, Maryland, but before finishing his course determined to begin life for himself at the West. He reached Omaha, Nebraska, in June, 1860, and accepted the arduous and adventurous business of freighting, or driving “prairie schooners” to various points in the Rocky Mountains, – Denver, Salt Lake, Bannack and Virginia City. He followed this occupation six years with the exception of a time spent in the army during the Rebellion. He rose in his frontier avocation, becoming master of the Red Line train to Salt Lake; but, finally taking a mule-train, he came through to Stockton, California, and in the autumn of 1866 sailed up to the Sound. He stopped off...

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Dayton, Gretchen Adeline – Obituary

Elgin, Oregon Gretchen Adeline Dayton, 85, of Elgin died July 17 at Grande Ronde Hospital. A graveside memorial will begin at 7 p.m. Friday at the Elgin cemetery. She was born Dec. 25, 1920, in Port Townsend, Wash., to Asa and Sylvia Fowler. She spent most of her life in the Puget Sound area, living in Tahuya and Brinnon. In 1981, she married Darius Dayton and moved to Elgin. She loved the outdoors, especially fishing and hunting, and enjoyed watching the sunsets from her kitchen window. She was a great storyteller and loved the antics of the young children who grew up in her neighborhood. Her husband, Darius, preceded her in death in 1990. Loveland Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrangements. The Observer Online, Obituaries for the week ending July 22, 2006 – Published: July 27,...

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Douhan, Margaret E. – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Margaret “Micky” E. Douhan, 95, died June 3 in Port Townsend, Wash. Memorial services were held at Quimper Unitarian Church in Port Townsend. Micky was born Oct. 13, 1911, in Greeley, Colo., to Carl and Vesta (Parker) Douhan in Greeley. The family moved to La Grande where Micky grew up and graduated from high school. She enrolled at Oregon State University in 1936 and received a Bachelor of Science degree in marine biology in 1940. Micky returned to school in 1968 and earned a master’s in liberal arts degree from Reed College in Portland. Micky met Wendell Stout at Oregon State, and they were married in Seattle on Aug. 21, 1941. They raised three children: Eric, Craig and Mark Stout. While Micky raised her family, she lived in Cordova, Alaska, Dixie, Idaho, and many places in Oregon including Bandon, Bend, Portland and Klamath Falls. In 1977, Micky retired to Marrowstone Island, Wash., but later moved to Port Townsend in 1997. She home-schooled her own children, and taught in public schools in Portland, and at Oregon Technical Institute. During her retirement, Micky traveled to Europe, Africa, Mexico, and the western U.S. and Alaska. She enjoyed painting and fiber arts. Her love of literature led her to volunteer much of her time to the Jefferson County Library. She also volunteered at the Port Townsend Baking Co. and was...

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McEwen, Mary Louise Hyde – Obituary

Toppenish—Mary Louise McEwen, 81, of Toppenish passed away at the Providence Hospital, Toppenish, on Friday, November 27, 1998. She was born on January 24, 1917 in Ashley, ND, the daughter of John and Mary Hyde. When she was three-years-old, the family moved to Quilcene, Washington, where she was raised and educated. She moved to Granger in 1945. She married Ralph McEwen [son of Oscar McEwen and Mary Peffers of Ellensburg]on March 25, 1978. Mary’s hobbies included crocheting, feeding the animals and spending time at Liberty where she and Ralph had a summer home. She was an avid traveler and had visited many countries including Israel, Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia, China, Singapore, Japan, Tahiti, Italy, Malaysia and Hawaii. She could give lessons on how to prepare and pack for a trip! She was an active member of Christ Episcopal Church of Zillah, serving on many committees. She also enjoyed her time as a member of Eastern Star. Mary had worked for a time at both Del Monte and Stokleys. Mary is survived by her husband, Ralph of the residence; three sons, Jack Childress and his wife, Nancy of Poquoson, VA, Ron Childress and his wife, Diana Menton of Chandler, AZ and Art McEwen of Yakima; two daughters, Fay Halsted of Tonasket, WA and Barbara Lilly of Yakima, WA; thirteen grandchildren and eleven great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by...

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Eccles, Darris Elwood – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Darris Elwood Eccles, 78, died at his Kala Point home on Oct. 14, 2004. He has been a resident of Port Townsend, Wash., since 1956. Born on Sept. 5, 1926, to Richmond and Lenore (Sturgill) Eccles in Baker City, Darris graduated from Baker High School. He was employed by Safeway Stores in several Oregon cities and entered the U.S. Navy in 1952, where he graduated as an operating room technician with honors. He loved his time in the service, traveling on a transport ship to Alaska and the Far East, according to his family. Darris married Lora L. Casteel on June 13, 1953, in Dayton, Wash. After his discharge from the Navy, he and Lora moved to Port Townsend and he was again employed by Safeway. Always an avid gardener, he began a landscaping business and nursery adjacent to their home on Cherry Street. When Bonzo and Dorothy DeLeo decided to sell their garden supply business in 1976, Darris and Lora bought the store and operated a nursery, painting and wallpaper establishment. Upon retiring in 1994, Darris enjoyed volunteering with the Friends of Old Fort Townsend State Park, serving as a docent at the Jefferson County Historical Museum, and spending more time with his grandchildren. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church and a member of the Rhododendron Society. He also enjoyed traveling, especially a...

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Baird, Philip R. – Obituary

Philip R. Baird, 70, of Sequim, Wash., died Jan. 29, 2003, at Port Angeles, Wash. His memorial service was today at the Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church at Sequim, Wash. The Rev. Jack Anderson officiated. Mr. Baird was born at Klickitat, Wash., on Oct. 9, 1932,to Vero W. Baird and Margaret Hutchins. He married JoAnna Redburn on Feb. 16, 1952, at Vancouver, Wash. Mr. Baird moved to Sequim in 1998 from Phoenix, Ariz., where he had worked as a food broker for many years. He retired in 1996. He was a member of the Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church at Sequim, Wash. Survivors include his wife, JoAnna Baird of Sequim, Wash.; sons, Chris and Craig Baird, both of Phoenix, Ariz.; daughter, Cathy Temple of Palouse, Wash.; his mother, Margaret Holcomb of Baker City; brother, Robert Baird of Fountain Hills, Ariz.; sisters, Corrine Fuzi of Coolin, Idaho, and Nancy Smith of Baker City; seven grandchildren and one great-grandchild. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Cheryl Anne Grimes; his father, Vero W. Baird; and his stepfather, Ralph Holcomb. Memorial contributions may be made to the Dungeness Valley Health & Wellness Clinic, P.O. Box 3434, Sequim, WA 98382. Used with permission from: Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, February 7, 2003 Transcribed by: Belva...

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Tumwater, Vancouver, Port Townsend, Washington

Tumwater, the initial point in the ‘history of the settlement of Puget Sound, was incorporated in Nov. 1869. In time it numbered more manufactories than any other town on the Sound. Vancouver and Early Settlers Vancouver was the fourth town in size in western Washington, having in 1880 about 3,000 inhabitants. It was made the county seat of Clarke County by the first legislative assembly of Washington, in March 1854, its pioneers, both English and American, long retaining their residences. Among the early settlers were James Turnbull, born in England, came to Washington in 1852, and with him William Turnbull, his nephew, long known in connection with steam boating on the Columbia. Both died in 1874. P. Ahern, born in Ireland, came to Vancouver with troops in 1832. Was elected county auditor in 1855, and representative in 1857. Stephen P. McDonald, born in Illinois, came with the immigration of 1852 to Washington. Engaged in printing, and was publisher of the Vancouver Register for a time. He represented Clarke County in the legislature in 1869, after which he was city recorder and clerk of the city council. He died Oct. 24, 1876. J. S. Hathaway, a native of New York, removed to Michigan when young, married in that state in 1847 and came to Clarke County in 1852. He was active in the volunteer service during the Indian war, and...

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Jefferson County, Washington Cemetery Records

Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Cemeteries (hosted At Jefferson County, Washington Tombstone Transcription Project) Center Cemetery St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery Soundview Cemetery Following Cemeteries (hosted at Interment) Brinnon Cemetery Laurel Grove Cemetery Saint Mary’s Catholic Cemetery  ...

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Biography of George B. Calhoun, M.D.

GEORGE B. CALHOUN,M.D. – There are but few men better known or more highly respected in the medical profession on Puget Sound than Doctor Calhoun, an excellent portrait of whom appears in this history. He is a native of New Brunswick, and was born October 19, 1837, his parents being John and Mary (Brewster) Calhoun. When he was but a small boy, he moved with his parents to the sunny South, locating in Maryland. His father, being a shipowner and seafaring man, was stricken, while on a voyage to the Bermudas, with yellow fever, from which he died. Our subject, with his widowed mother, then moved to East Boston, and a few years alter was placed in the excellent Horton Academy, Nova Scotia, where he remained until 1857. He was then sent to the university at Glasgow, Scotland, and after five years’ constant application was awarded his degree, standing near the head of his class. In 1862 he returned to America. After traveling two years for pleasure, he entered the United States army as assistant surgeon, remaining in that capacity until June, 1865. In August of the latter year, he came via the Nicaragua route to the Pacific coast, and in June, 1866, took charge of the marine hospital at Port Angles. But, Congress designating Port Townsend as the port of entry, Doctor Calhoun took up his residence in...

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