Location: Jefferson County MO

Biography of the Hensley Brothers

Samuel and Benjamin Hensley were sons of an English family that settled on the Potomac River in Virginia, at an early date. Samuel married a Miss Landers, and they had Samuel, Jr., and William. His first wife died, and he was married again to Susan Taplett, by whom he had several children. William, son of Samuel, Jr., by his first wife, married Elizabeth Appleberry, of Virginia, and they had James, Benjamin, William, Jr., Thomas, Fleming, Judith, and Elizabeth. James, William, Jr., Thomas, and Fleming came to Montgomery County in 1826, and all except Thomas afterward married and settled in Jefferson Co., Mo. Thomas Hensley was born in Albemarle Co., Va., in 1796, and when eighteen years of age he enlisted as a soldier in the war of 1812. He afterward married Harriet Rust, who was a daughter of Samuel Rust and Mary Lee Bailey, who was the daughter of James Bailey and Nancy Smith. Mr. Hensley with his wife and four children, embarked in a keel boat of his own make, on the Pocotalico river, and floated down to the Big Kenhawa, and thence to the Ohio, on their way to Missouri. They reached Louisville in safety, but just below that place their boat sank, and it was with the greatest difficulty that they succeeded in reaching the shore in safety. Here they built a cabin and remained one...

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Biography of Rev. John J. Dillon

Since the 9th of December, 1915, Rev. John J. Dillon has been pastor of the Church of Our Lady of Mount Carmel at Baden, Missouri, where he has labored untiringly, his efforts being crowned with a most substantial measure of success. Father Dillon was ordained to the priesthood from St. John’s church in St. Louis on the 30th of May, 1885, Archbishop John J. Glennon officiating. More than a third of a century has passed since that time and throughout the entire period Father Dillon has been most consecrated to his work, his labors accomplishing splendid results. He went to Mexico, Missouri, as pastor of St. Brendan’s church on the 18th of June, 1899, and there remained until his present appointment. In the meantime, before going to Mexico and following his graduation from the Provencial Seminary at Milwaukee in 1885, he acted as assistant of St. John’s parish in St. Louis and then went to Valley Park, where he established a parish. While there he became ill and it was feared that pulmonary trouble would develop. It was through the influence and efforts of Father Phelan of St. Brendan’s church in Mexico that he became chaplain of the cemetery under Father Phelan and continued in that position until 1892, during which period he said the burial service for more than twenty thousand people. The open-air work greatly benefited his...

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Biography of Adrian D. Nichols, D. O.

The school of osteopathy has a worthy representative in Adrian D. Nichols, who is a successful practitioner of St. Louis, and since his graduation from the Kirksville School of Osteopathy has practiced in this city. He was born on a farm near Nashville, Illinois, April 17, 1870, and is a son of David William and Tabitha (Ballard) Nichols. The father, a native of the state of New York, was born in what was then known as Bath Village but is now the city of Syracuse. He was a son of William Nichols who came to America from Scotland in early life. David W. Nichols was born in 1832 and pursued his education in the schools of Michigan, to which state his parents removed when he was quite young. Later the family home was established at Quincy, Illinois, where he was residing at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war. Upon President Lincoln’s call to arms he was one of the first to enlist, joining Major Wood’s One Hundred Day Men. The commander later turned his troops over to the Mulligan Brigade at Lexington. They were exchanged as prisoners of war at Jefferson Barracks, after being kept there for a time. They were paroled and discharged at Hannibal, Missouri. Later Mr. Nichols joined the forces of General Curtis at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, and at Corinth joined the troops...

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Biography of George W. Haverstick, M. D.

Dr. George W. Haverstick, a physician and surgeon of St. Louis, was born in De Soto, Missouri, January 8, 1866. His father, the late William J. Haverstick, also a native of this state, was a son of George Washington Haverstick, while the latter’s father was a native of Switzerland and became one of the pioneer settlers of Missouri, where he took up his abode ere the admission of the state into the union. He became a resident of Jefferson county, being among the first to locate in De Soto. William J. Haverstick was reared and educated in De Soto and for many years successfully followed farming and stock raising in Jefferson county. He passed away at the age of seventy-two years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Vinyard, was born in Jefferson county, Missouri, a daughter of the late Belleview Vinyard, who was born in Virginia and became one of the early residents of Jefferson county, Missouri. His ancestors came from England on the Mayflower. The death of Mrs. Elizabeth Haverstick occurred in De Soto, Missouri, in 1919, when she was seventy- three years of age. By her marriage she had become the mother of six sons and three daughters and eight of the family are living. Dr. Haverstick of this review, the third child and eldest son, was educated in the public schools of his...

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Biography of Theodore C. Brandle

Theodore C. Brandle, who is at the head of the Traffic Motor Truck Corporation of St. Louis, is a self-made man, who starting out in life empty-handed, has worked his way steadily upward. lie has made notable progress as a result of his unfaltering determination, his carefully formulated plans and his keen business discernment. St. Louis has reason to be proud of him as one of her native sons, for he was born in this city February 2, 1894, his parents being Charles P. and Belle (Keeler) Brandle, both of whom were natives of St. Louis, where they still make their home. Theodore C. Brandle, their only child, was educated in the public schools and afterward pursued a teacher’s course and when but sixteen years of age taught school in Jefferson county, Missouri. In 1910 he returned to St. Louis, accepting a position with the Bell Telephone Company, with which he remained for a short time. He then entered an automobile repair shop in order thoroughly to learn the business, desiring to acquaint himself with automobile construction. He afterward took a position as salesman for a retail automobile house and in 1914 organized the Westcott Motor Sales Company, operating under that name for a time and then changing the name to the Brandle Motors Company. His business was at that time located on South Grand Avenue. As the years...

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Biography of George T. Lee

GEORGE T. LEE. It is a pleasure and a privilege to record the character and enterprise of men of business who, on account of their long tenure and extensive operations, comprise almost a history of the business in which they are engaged. Of such men it is unnecessary to speak in words of colored praise. By their acts ye shall know them.” Their very existence is emphatic evi-dence of the honorable position they occupy and the long course of just dealing that they have pursued. A gentleman in mind is George T. Lee, who was born in Jefferson County, Missouri, February 22, 1844, a son of Giles and Ary (Graham) Lee. Giles Lee was born in Westmoreland County, Virginia, on March 10, 1796, and he was a son of John Lee, who came to this country from England in early times. The Great-grandfather Lee was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Giles Lee was reared in Virginia and came to Missouri in 1819, settling on the Mississippi River. There he passed the remainder of his days engaged in farming and tanning, his death occurring in 1880. His wife was a native of Jefferson County, Missouri, born on Big River in 1827, and she was a daughter of one of the early pioneers who came from Kentucky. Three children were given them: James W., George T. and Margaret V. William...

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Biography of William F. Herrington

The medical profession would seem to afford a better business training than any other of the learned professions. At least, of the lawyers and clergymen who turn their attention to the business very many of them fail. Very few physicians do, and in almost any community the successful physician develops, without apparent effort, into the successful man of affairs. One of the many medical men who are making noteworthy careers as businessmen is the gentleman whose name is the title of this article. Dr. William F. Herrington was born in Jefferson County, Missouri, September 12, 1861, a son of S. G. and Jane (Beeler) Herrington. His father was born in Missouri also, in 1841, and is now a well-to-do farmer in the southern part of that state. His mother, a native of Tennessee, died in Missouri, when only twenty-four years of age. After gaining a practical education in the public schools of Salem, Missouri, and spending several years in business pursuits, young Herrington began the study of medicine, at the age of twenty-four, under the preceptorship of Dr. L. B. Laws, of Houston, Missouri. Later he took a course of professional lectures at Cincinnati, Ohio, and was graduated in 1889 from the American Medical College, of St. Louis, Missouri, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He practiced his profession one year in Missouri and one year in the...

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Houses of the Illinois Confederacy

Although the tribes of the loosely constituted Illinois confederacy claimed and occupied a wide region east of the Mississippi, in later years centering in the valley of the Illinois River, nevertheless certain villages are known to have crossed and re-crossed the great river. Thus, in the early summer of 1673, Père Marquette arrived at a village of the Peoria then standing on the right Mississippi, at or near the or west bank of the later it had removed to the upper Illinois. Two months passing the Peoria, Marquette discovered another of  the Illinois tribes, the Michigamea, living near the northeastern corner of the present State of Arkansas, and consequently west of the Mississippi. On the map of Pierre van der Aa, circa 1720 two small streams are shown flowing into the Mississippi from the west, a short distance south of the Missouri. The more northerly of the two is probably intended to represent the Meramec and a dot at the north side of the mouth of the stream bears the legend: “Village des Ilinois et des Caskoukia “probably the Cahokia. This stream forms the boundary between Jefferson and St. Louis Counties, Missouri, and a short distance above its junction with the Mississippi are traces of a large villages with many stone-lined graves, probably indicating the position of the Illinois village of two centuries ago. Also on the d’Anville map,...

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Biography of Willis Grafton Robertson

Willis Grafton Robertson, member of the Muskogee bar, his attention being devoted to civil law practice, was born in Jefferson county, Missouri, December 10, 1850, and is a son of James A. and Mary J. (Cundiff) Robertson. The father, a farmer by occupation, was born in the year 1818, in what was then the territory of Missouri, and in the early days he hauled iron ore to St. Louis with ox team. He died at the notable old age of ninety-three years, while his wife lived to the advanced age of eighty-nine years. She was a native of Kentucky and went to Missouri during her girlhood days. Willis O. Robertson was reared upon the home farm, his early educational advantages being such as were accorded in one of the old time log schoolhouses of Hickory county, Missouri. The father and one brother of Willis G. Robertson were soldiers of the Union army during the Civil war and thus much of the work of the farm devolved upon the subject of this review. He early became familiar with the tasks of plowing, planting and harvesting and continued upon the farm until he reached the age of twenty-seven years, when he determined to turn his attention to professional interests and became a law student at the county seat of Hickory county, entering the office of F. W. Wilson, who directed his...

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Biography of John Hunt

John Hunt is one of the oldest business men in point of continuous service at Grenola, Kansas. He established a lumber business there more than thirty-four years ago, and today he is the only merchant furnishing lumber and building supplies to the people of that community. He had had a long and active career, and aside from his material achievement he may take special pride in the fact that he had reared a large family of self-respecting, honest and worthy children. He represents old American stock. The Hunts came originally from Wales and were settlers in New Jersey in colonial days. The family in the various generations have not failed to give a good account of themselves when called upon to render patriotic service as soldiers. Mr. Hunt’s grandfather was Elijah Hunt, who died at Trenton, New Jersey, before John Hunt was born. Mr. John Hunt was born at St. Louis, Missouri, June 23, 1842. His father, Isaac Hunt, was born at Trenton, New Jersey, in 1793, and was a boy soldier with a New Jersey regiment in the War of 1812. He was reared and married in New Jersey and spent his active career as a farmer. He was one of the pioneer American settlers in the vicinity of St. Louis, Missouri. He arrived there and secured a claim in St. Louis County in 1820, a year before...

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Bilyeu, Nancy Ellen Cole – Obituary

Mrs. Nancy Ellen Bilyeu, 64, died here Sunday [February 18, 1945] at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ima Woodard. Funeral services are to be held in the Weddle Chapel here at 2 p.m. Tuesday with Rev. Kenneth W. Knox officiating. Burial will be in the Bilyeu Den Cemetery. Born at Grubville, Mo., on July 9, 1880, Mrs. Bilyeu had lived in Oregon for 62 years, chiefly In the Scio-Crabtree area. In addition to her daughter, Mrs. Woodard, she is survived by two grandchildren, Larry and Collene; four brothers, Robert Cole of Salem, Curtis Cole of Eugene, Roy and Otto Cole of Astoria; three sisters, Mrs. Lucy Pepperline of Crabtree, Mrs. Ada Applet of Grants Pass and Mrs. Mabel Leffler of Stayton as well as a number of nieces and nephews. Albany Democrat-Herald, February 19, 1945 Contributed by: Shelli...

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