Location: Jasper County MS

The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his maps and geographical charts, and...

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Slave Narrative of Susan Snow

Interviewer: William B. Allison Person Interviewed: Susan Snow Location: Meridian, Mississippi Place of Birth: Wilcox County, Alabama Date of Birth: 1850 Age: 87 “Aunt Sue” Snow, a rather small and profusely wrinkled 87-year-old ex-slave, lives in the Negro quarters of the South Side in Meridian. In spite of her wild escapades, her reputation for honesty and reliability is high and she carries and exhibits with pride numerous letters attesting that fact. She often finds it necessary to stand and act the story she is telling. Her memory is amazing and she turns with equal readiness to copious quotations from the Scripture and other pious observations to amusing but wholly unprintable anecdotes of her somewhat lurid past. “I was born in Wilcox County, Alabama, in 1850. W.J. Snow was my old marster. He bought my ma from a man named Jerry Casey. Venus was her name, but dey mos’ly called her ‘Venie.’ “I’s workin’ now for one o’ my old folks. I can’t work much—jus’ carries things to ‘er an’ such. She’s my old mistis’ own daughter an’ she’s got gran’chillun grown an’ married. All de chillun dat’s livin’ is older’n me. “When her pa bought my mammy, I was a baby. Her pa owned a heap o’ Niggers. I’s de only one still hangin’ aroun’. “My ma was a black African an’ she sho’ was wild an’ mean. She...

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Slave Narrative of Jessie Rowell

Person Interviewed: Jessie Rowell Location: Dade County, Florida Jessie Rowell, 331 NW 19th St., Miami, Florida was born in Mississippi, between Fossburg and Heidelberg, on the Gaddis plantation. “My grandmother worked in the house, but my mother worked in the field hoeing or picking cotton or whatever there was to do. I was too little to work. “All that I can ‘member is, that I was just a little tot running ’round, and I would always watch for my mother to come home. I was always glad to see her, for the day was long and I knew she’d cook something for me to eat. I can ‘member dat es good as ’twas yestiday. “We ‘stayed on’ after Freedom. Mother was give wages then, but I don’t know how...

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Biography of Rev. Thompson K. Bridges

Rev. Thompson K. Bridges, (B. Dec. 6, 1856), Lukfata, is a native of Ellisville, Jones County, Mississippi. He grew to manhood and received his early education at Claiborne, Jasper County. Later he attended the city school at Meridian, and then took a course in theology at Biddle University. He began to teach public school at the age of 21 in 1877, and taught fourteen years in Mississippi. In 1891, he located in Indian Territory, and has now taught sixteen years in Oklahoma. In 1899 he was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Catawba and in April 1902 was ordained by the same Presbytery. His first ministerial labors were at Griffin, Indian Territory, where in 1903 he effected the organization of the Ebenezer Church. The next year he continued to serve Ebenezer, but located at Lukfata, where he has since continued to serve as the stated supply of the Mount Gilead Church, and teacher of the local school. He served two years, 1904 and 1905, as stated clerk of the Presbytery of Kiamichi. Mr. Bridges has been a progressive teacher and minister. In his youth, he formed the habit of having a good book or paper always at hand to occupy his attention profitably, whenever he had a spare moment. That habit of private study in spare moments has enabled him to keep abreast of the times, and the...

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Choctaw Indians

Choctaw Tribe: Meaning unknown, though Halbert (1901) has suggested that they received their name from Pearl River, “Hachha”. Also called: Ani’-Tsa’ta, Cherokee name. Flat Heads, from their custom of flattening the heads of infants. Henne’sb, Arapaho name. Nabuggindebaig, probably the Chippewa name for this tribe, signifying “flat heads.” Pans falaya, “Long Hairs,” given by Adair. Sanakfwa, Cheyenne name, meaning “feathers sticking up above the ears.” Té-qta, Quapaw name. Tca-qtr£ an-ya-df, or Tea-qti ham-ya, Biloxi name. Tca-t a, Kansa name. Tetes Plates, French equivalent of “Flat Heads.” Tsah-tfl, Creek name. Choctaw Connections. This was the largest tribe belonging to the southern Muskhogean branch. Linguistically, but not physically, it was most closely allied with the Chickasaw and after them with the Alabama. Choctaw Location. Nearly all of the Choctaw towns were in the southeastern part of Mississippi though they controlled the adjoining territory in the present State of Alabama. The small tribes of Mobile were sometimes called Choctaw. (See also Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma, Alabama, and Arkansas.) Choctaw Villages From the earliest times of which we have any knowledge the Choctaw villages were distributed into three divisions: a southern, a northeastern, and a western, though a central group may also be distinguished. The southern division is fairly well defined by our several informants, but there is considerable disagreement with reference to the others. One authority gives but two divisions, an eastern and...

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