Location: Jasper County MO

Biographical Sketch of Charles L. McMasters

Charles L. McMasters, dealer in grain, coal and seeds, and a popular young man of Tuscola, was born on a farm three miles northwest of Tuscola, in Tuscola township, March 26, 1867, and is a son of S. L. and Hannah ( Maris) Maris)McMasters, who were natives of Parke County, Indiana. In 1869 his father sold, his farm and removed to Sand Springs, Kansas, where he followed farming and stock raising until his death in Mary, 1870, after which his mother, with three children, two sons and one daughter-Charles being the younger-removed to Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas, where she resided until the spring of 1877, thence moving to Joplin, Jasper County, Missouri, where she died October 3, of the same year. In March, 1878, Charles, being only in his eleventh year, returned to Tuscola to live with his uncle, James Davis. Here he went to school until February, 1886, when he became a clerk for Davis & Finney, in the grain business, and remained their bookkeeper and confidential clerk up to 1888, when Mr. Davis died. The firm was then succeeded by Finney & McMasters, which business continued up to 1891, when Mr. McMasters bought the interest of his partner and since then has been alone. He is now in the midst of what promises to be a most successful business career. He buys and sells about two hundred...

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Slave Narrative of Aunt Adeline

“I was born a slave about 1848, in Hickmon County, Tennessee,” said Aunt Adeline who lives as care taker in a house at 101 Rock Street, Fayetteville, Arkansas, which is owned by the Blakely-Hudgens estate. Aunt Adeline has been a slave and a servant in five generations of the Parks family. Her mother, Liza, with a group of five Negroes, was sold into slavery to John P.A. Parks, in Tennessee, about 1840. “When my mother’s master come to Arkansas about 1849, looking for a country residence, he bought what was known as the old Kidd place on the Old Wire Road, which was one of the Stage Coach stops. I was about one year old when we came. We had a big house and many times passengers would stay several days and wait for the next stage to come by. It was then that I earned my first money. I must have been about six or seven years old. One of Mr. Parks’ daughters was about one and a half years older than I was. We had a play house back of the fireplace chimney. We didn’t have many toys; maybe a doll made of a corn cob, with a dress made from scraps and a head made from a roll of scraps. We were playing church. Miss Fannie was the preacher and I was the audience. We were...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. DeWitt Martin

(See Grant and Duncan) DeWitt T. Martin, born May 12, 1888 enlisted in the World War Nov. 22, 1917. Assigned to the 17th Co. of the 2nd Regiment as an air service mechanic January 27, 18. Sailed for France March 14, 1918, where his service entitled him to two gold chevrons. Returned to the United States May 29, 1919. Honorably discharged at Camp Pike June 13, 1919. Married at Carthage, Missouri, May 1, 1920, Mary Ethel daughter of I. D. and Rachel A. Boston. They are the parents of Caroline Louise Martin, born March 24, 1821. Joseph Martin of Bristol, England, settled on a plantation near Charlotteville, Albemarle County, Virginia, in the first quarter the eighteenth century. He married Susannah Childs and they were the parents of Joseph Martin, born about 1740. He was lieutenant Colonel in the American service in the Revolutionary war. He married Susannah Fields, nee Emory, a quarter-blood Cherokee, and they were the parents of John Martin, who was the first Chief Justice and first Treasurer of the Cherokee Nation. Judge John Martin was the father of Joseph Lynch Martin, whose son, John Rogers Martin was the father of DeWitt T....

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Ray N. Skinner

(See Downing and Duncan)-Jemima Winnie Davis, daughter of Robert Ray and Cynthia Jane (Horn) Taylor was born Tuesday, February 12, 1898. Educated at Willie Halsell College and Sacred Heart Institute, Vinita. Married at Carthage, Missouri, August 25, 1913, Ray Nathaniel, son of Nathaniel and Nannie (Kell) Skinner, born September 28, 1884, in Vinita. They are the parents of Gay Nell Skinner, born March 1, 1914 in Phoenix, Arizona. Nannie, daughter of Lewis Ross and Sarah (Chambers) Kell was born January 28, 1861. Married in March 1879 Nathanial Skinner, born April 8, 1851 in Harrison County, Kentucky. She died January 28, 1889. Nancy Elizabeth, daughter of Broom, Chief of Broomstown, a full blood Cherokee of the Wolf Clan married Nathan Hicks, a white man. They were the parents of Charles R. Hicks, born in 1760 and died in 1826. Elsie, daughter of Charles R. Hicks, born in 1760 and died in 1826. Elsie, daughter of Charles R. Hicks, married Jeremiah Horn, a white man and they were the parents of William Horn who married Margaret Ledbetter. Their daughter Cynthia Jane Horn was born November 29, 1847 in Collin County, Texas. Married in Collin County, March 14, 1871, Robert Ray Taylor, born November 25, 1832 in Wilson County, Tennessee. He died February 12, 1920. Mr. Skinner is a farmer and stockraiser near Vinita. Mrs. Skinner’s Cherokee name is...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas Rogers

(See Grant and Downing)-Thomas Lewis, son of Thomas Lewis and Nancy C. (Martin) Rogers, was born near Pawhuska, September 2, 1885. He was educated in that city. He married in 1917 at Joplin, Missouri, Bessie Barrett. He is the father of Thomas Lewis, born July 28, 1911; and Nancy Rogers, born April 24, 1914. Mr. Rogers is a member of the Christian church, and a merchant at...

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Biography of Andrew Calvin Sewell

Andrew Calvin Sewell, a younger brother of J. B. Sewell, was born in Overton County, Tennessee, May 30, 1856. He was fifteen when the family came across the country in a prairie schooner to Montgomery County, Kansas, and in the meantime had attended public schools in Tennessee. While living on the farm southwest of Independence he continued his education in the district schools and in the fall of 1876 became a teacher. Preparatory to beginning his work as a teacher he had attended a private school conducted by Professor Morrison of Radical City. In his home district, Harrisonville, he taught a term, then attended the Normal Institute at Independence, and in the fall of 1877 took up his work in the Peebler District. The following spring he returned to the Harrisonville District and taught a term of three months, and then for three years was principal of schools at Elk City. After that he was again in the Harrisonville District, afterwards was principal for a year at Elk City, and then entered the mercantile business at Elk City. In 1898 he moved to Joplin, Missouri, where he was connected with merchandising and also as a prospector and miner for about two years. In 1901, after coming back to Elk City, he secured leases for about 17,000 acres of land in behalf of the Elk City Gas and Oil Company....

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Biography of Robert E. Hughes, M.D.D.

Dr. Robert E. Hughes, engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in St. Louis, was born in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, April 2, 1872. His father, the late James T. Hughes, was a native of Kentucky and belonged to one of the old families of that state of Scotch and Welsh descent. James T. Hughes conducted a tobacco plantation and was quite successful in his business affairs. During the Civil war he joined the Confederate army, serving under General John Morgan as a private, and was on active duty throughout the period of hostilities. He reached the advanced age of eighty-two years, passing away at Higginsville, Missouri, in December, 1917. He married Margaret McMahon, a native of Indiana and of Irish descent. They became the parents of two sons: Oliver P., of Pleasant Hill, Missouri; and Dr. Hughes. The mother departed this life at Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1906, at the age of forty-two years. Dr. Hughes was educated in the public schools of Sparta, Indiana, and the high school at Pleasant Hill, Missouri, and started out to earn his own livelihood when a lad o1 fifteen years. He was engaged with his father in tobacco raising to the age of eighteen, his first outside employment being that of bill clerk in the house of representatives under the administration of Governor Lon V. Stephens, in which position he continued for about...

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Biography of Alfred H. Purdy

ALFRED H. PURDY. Among the enterprising and successful produce merchants of Billings, Missouri, Alfred H. Purdy holds a prominent position. He has been in business in this city since 1880, has developed a permanent patronage, and his house is one of the creditable monuments to the business circles of this place. He came originally from south Illinois, born December 28, 1857, to the union of Henry I. and Mary (Varnum) Purdy. Our subject passed his boyhood and youth in his native county, and in addition to a common-school education attended college at Carbondale, where he was thoroughly educated. For a short time he clerked in Carbondale, but later came to Missouri, and clerked in a store in Joplin for a number of years. In 1880 he came to Billings, leased the mill, and was engaged in the milling business from that time until 1884, under the firm name of Purdy & Goesling. After that he and his brother, C. E. Purdy, embarked in the grocery business, which they followed for about six years, when our subject bought out his partner. Later he sold this, and still later branched out in the produce business with L. M.Wolfe, now the vice-president of Billings Mercantile Company. In 1890 Mr. Purdy and George M. Scott bought out Mr. John Seide, mercantile store, also the store of C. E. Purdy, consolidated the business, and...

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Biography of Hon. Simeon W. Bunch

HON. SIMEON W. BUNCH. The fortunate possessor of 205 acres of as good and as there is in the beautiful township of Sparta, our subject is one of the progressive farmers and representative citizens of Christian County, Missouri, where he has long made his home. He came originally from Simpson County, Kentucky, born in 1832. His parents, William and Malinda (Roark) Bunch, were probably natives of Tennessee, where they were reared and married. About 1831 the parents moved to Simpson County, Kentucky, and there the father died about 1833, when in the prime of life. He was a farmer by occupation and a soldier during the Black Hawk War. He was a son of Calloway and Nancy Bunch, who died in Warren County, Kentucky., when our subject was but a boy. The latter belonged to the old Virginia family of Bunches. After the death of her husband the mother of our subject married Joseph Cook, of Kentucky, and in 1837 removed with him to Taney County, Missouri, where Mr. Cook died a few years later. Afterward Mrs. Cook made her home with her children and died at the home of her son in Miller County, Missouri, about 1883. She was a Free-Will Baptist in her religious views. When she and her husband first settled in Taney County their nearest neighbor was ten miles away and the country was a...

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Biography of J. S. Johnson

J. S. JOHNSON. It is always a pleasure to deal with the history of one of those grand old families that have for generations been distinguished for patriotism, genuine Christianity and strong characteristics which have made them prominent wherever they have settled. J. S. Johnson, who has been a resident of this State since 1868, and of Ozark since 1873, is descended from an old and prominent Virginia family. His grandfather Johnson was a native of the Old Dominion, and a soldier in the Revolutionary War, as were other members of this family. David Johnson, the father of our subject, was also born in Virginia and was a soldier in the War of 1812 under Gen. Harrison. He took part in the battle of Tippecanoe. All his life was spent in farming and he became fairly well off. In politics he was a Whig. He was married to Miss Frances McDaniell and subsequently emigrated to Indiana, where six children were born, our subject being one of these. By a previous marriage the father reared a family of twelve children. The father and mother of J. S. Johnson passed their last days in Indiana, the former dying in 1875, and the latter ten years later, both quite aged. J. S. Johnson first saw the light in Indiana, July 1, 1829, and his early life was spent on a farm. He...

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Biography of Z. A. Johnson

It is generally considered by those in the habit of super-ficial thinking that the history of so-called great men only is worthy of preservation, and that little merit exists among the masses to call forth the praise of the historian or the cheers and appreciation of mankind. A greater mistake was never made. No man is great in all things,and very few are great in many things. Many, by a lucky stroke, achieve lasting fame, who before that had no reputation beyond the limits of their neighborhood. It is not a history of the lucky stroke which benefits humanity most, but the long study and effort which made the lucky stroke possible. It is the preliminary work-the method -that serves as a guide for the success of others. Thus it appears that the lives of the masses out of which come the men who control the world, will furnish the grandest, truest lesson for the benefit of humanity. Among the successful and popular business men of Ozark, stands Z. A. Johnson, who is a member of the well-known grocery establishment of Wolff & Johnson. He was originally from the Hoosier State, born in Owen County February 16, 1851, and is a son of J. S.and Hannah (Dean) Johnson, natives of Indiana and Ohio, respectively. His grandparents on both sides came originally from Virginia, where they were among the prominent...

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Biography of David Wolff

DAVID WOLFF. In the whole range of commercial enterprise no interest is of more importance than that representing the sale of groceries. This fact is recognized and appreciated by all thoughtful and intelligent persons. In this connection we take pleasure in calling attention to a house which, though only established since 1883, has already proved itself to be indispensable to the locality. David Wolff is a native of the Buckeye State, born in Ross County January 2, 1852, and is a son of Jacob and Elizabeth Wolff, both of whom died in Ohio. This worthy couple were the parents of seven children, only two besides our subject now living: Charles A., who is still in Ohio, and Fredrick, who is in Kalamazoo, Mich. One son, William, who died in 1883, was a soldier in the Civil War as was also Charles and Fredrick. John, another son, died after reaching mature years, and the remainder of the children, daughters, died young. The Wolff family settled in Ohio at an early date and the father of our subject was a merchant there. He was a native of Germany and came to this country when young. David Wolff attained his growth in his native State and was about nine years of age when his father died. He received his scholastic training in his native town and when twenty-one years of age started...

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Biography of R. W. Lewis

R. W. Lewis is now serving his second term as sheriff of Montgomery County. He is a native of Montgomery County, and for many years has had a reputation as a man who does things in a large and efficient way. That is true of his official career as also of his business record. Mr. Lewis has some extensive interests as a merchant in Independence, owns a large amount of property, and is one of the leading oil producers in that section of the state. He is an American to the core, and represents a family that came from England to Virginia prior to the Revolution. His grandfather spent his life in Virginia as a planter. R. W. Lewis was born in Montgomery County, Kansas, January 1, 1875. His father is E. T. Lewis, who was born in Virginia in 1844, and is now living practically retired on a small farm a mile north of Independence. He is a veteran of the Confederate army, having enlisted from his native state in 1862 and serving until the close of the war. He was in the Shenandoah Valley campaign and also in many of the battles around Richmond with Lee’s army. He was twice wounded, and once taken a prisoner, but managed to make his escape. After the war he came West, lived in Jasper County, Missouri, for several years, and...

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Biography of R. F. Buller

In modern ages, and to a large extent in the past, banks have constituted a vital part of organized society, and governments, both monarchical and popular, have depended upon them for material aid in times of depression and trouble. Their influence has extended over the entire world and their prosperity has been the barometer which was unfalteringly indicated the financial status of all nations. Of this important branch of business R. F. Buller is a worthy representative. In April 1892, he came to Hailey, and is now president of the First National Bank, which has become one of the leading and reliable financial concerns in southern Idaho. Mr. Buller is a native of Coburg, Canada, his birth having there occurred March 10, 1840. He is of English descent, and his father, Charles G. Buller, a native of England, emigrated to Canada in 1830. He was married in Coburg to Miss Frances Boucher. He had been educated, in Oxford College, for the Episcopal ministry, but preferred agricultural pursuits to the calling for which his parents intended him, and throughout his business career carried on farming. His was an honorable and successful life, and his death occurred in 1897, when he had attained the ripe old age of ninety-six years. His wife passed away in 1898, at the age of eighty-six years. They had nine children, five of whom are living....

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Biography of Julius Weiss

Julius Weiss. Recently the Topeka Daily Capital had an illustration on one of its pages showing a banquet table surrounded by a group of some of the best known and most prominent veteran business men of Topeka. Underneath was a text explaining the occasion. A part of this reads as follows: “Fifty years at the old stand, forty-seven years at the same number and still an active business man. That is something of a distinction. March 1, 1866, Julius Weiss, a young captain of calvary who had served all through the Civil war in an Illinois regiment, opened a grocery store on Kansas Avenue. Wednesday evening, March 1, just fifty years to the day, a group of Mr. Weiss’ friends gathered at his home, 421 Tyler, to celebrate the anniversary with him. Everybody there felt it was a great event, and it was. “A likeness of Mr. Weiss taken fifty years ago, with bushy hair and long moustache, so fashionable in the early ’60s, judging by all Civil war photographs, was shown on the place cards. It didn’t look much like the kindly man with closely cropped gray VanDyke and high forehead who sat smiling at the head of the table. It was a unique dinner party and a jolly one. Several of Mr. Weiss’ fifty-year customers were there. Nowadays we call them patrons. In the group were pre-staters,...

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