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Location: Jackson Tennessee

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Joseph S. Hogue

(See Oolootsa and Ghigau)—Mary Erskine Clark, born December 12, 1880, educated at Jackson Tennessee. Married at Chelsea June 5, 1898 to Joseph Sterling Hogue, born January 28, 1867 in Granger County, Tennessee. They are the parents of Joseph Clarke, born January 7, 1900; Condroy Lea, born June 20, 1903 and Sarah Erskine Hogue, born April 7,...

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Slave Narrative of Henry F. Pyles

Person Interviewed: Henry F. Pyles Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Date of Birth: August 15, 1856 Age: 81 That’s how the niggers say old Bab Russ used to make the hoodoo “hands” he made for the young bucks and wenches, but I don’t know. ’cause I was too trusting to look inside de one he make for me, and anyways I lose it, and it no good nohow! Old Bab Russ live about two mile from me, and I went to him one night at midnight and ask him to make me de hand. I was a young strapper about sixteen years old, and thinking about wenches pretty hard and wanting something to help me out wid the one I liked best. Old Bab Russ charge me four bits for dat hand, and I had to give four bits more for a pint of whiskey to wet it wid, and it wasn’t no good nohow! Course dat was five-six years after de war. I wasn’t yet quite eleven when de war close. Most all the niggers was farming on de shares and whole lots of them was still working for their old Master yet. Old Bab come in there from deep South Carolina two-three years befo’ and live all by hisself. De gal I was worrying about had come wid her old pappy and mammy to pick cotton on de place....

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Slave Narrative of Sallie Carder

Person Interviewed: Sallie Carder Location: Burwin, Oklahoma Age: 83 I was born in Jackson, Tennessee, and I’m going on 83 years. My mother was Harriott Noel and father Jeff Bills, both of them named after their masters. I has one brother, J. B. Bills, but all de rest of my brothers and daters is dead. No sir, we never had no money while I was a slave. We jest didn’t have nothing a toll! We ate greens, corn bread, and ash cake. Do only time I ever got a biscuit would be when a misdemeanor was did, and my Mistress would give a buttered biscuit to de one who could tell her who done it. In hot weather and cold weather dere was no difference as to what we were. We were dresses my mother wove for us and no shoes a tall. I never wore any shoes till I was grown and den dey was old Brogans wid only two holes to lace, one on each side. During my wadding I wore a blue calico dress, a man’s shirt tail as a head rag, and a pair of brogan shoes. My Master lived in a three-story frame house painted white. My Mistress was very mean. Sometimes she would make de overseer whip Negross for looking too hard at her when she was talking to dam. Day had four...

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Biography of William A. Halliburton

WILLIAM A. HALLIBURTON. Few, if any, among those engaged in the occupation of farming in Stone County, Arkansas, maintain a higher reputation for intelligence, thrift and industry than William A. Halliburton. He was born in Jackson, Tennessee, July 11, 1842, to Benjamin and Kansas P. (Holliman) Halliburton, who were natives of North Carolina and Tennessee respectively. The father was a small child when taken by his parents to Tennessee, but he grew up and married in Jackson County. He came with his family to Arkansas in 1852, and located in the neighborhood of Bickhorn, his farm at that time being a heavily wooded tract. He was a good all-around mechanic, and could make almost anything that he undertook to do, and was especially good in building chimneys and making chairs. In 1862 he joined a company of cavalry, but was taken sick at Holly Springs, Miss., and there died, at the age of forty-four years. His widow survived him until 1890, at the age of seventy-two years. They were members of the Methodist Church and were worthy and highly-respected citizens, and reared their children to honorable maturity. William A. was the eldest of the family, and is one of the four surviving members. He received a practical common school education, but dropped his books to enter the Confederate service, and June 6, 1861, joined the Seventh Arkansas Infantry, serving...

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Biography of Joseph B. Johnson

JOSEPH B. JOHNSON. With a record that is enviable, Joseph B. Johnson has been county clerk of Oregon County, Missouri, for the past eight years, and will no doubt succeed himself to that position at the next election. He has won for himself an honored position among the representative men of this section, and has been closely identified with many of its best interests. Like two-thirds of the best citizens of the county, Mr. Johnson is a native of Tennessee, born in Jackson in 1852, son of William R. and Martha Ann (Brown) Johnson. The father was also born in Tennessee, and has followed the blacksmith’s trade all his life. He came from Tennessee to Stoddard County, Missouri, man years ago, and resided there until recently, when he came to Oregon County, and has since made his home with his son, Joseph B. During the Civil War he was in the Confederate Army, and served in a Missouri regiment as drummer. He was west of the Mississippi River most of the time. Joseph B. Johnson was a child of four years when his mother died, and he was taken by an uncle, W. C. Livingston, a farmer of Tennessee. The latter removed to Stoddard County, Missouri, in 1855, and two years later to the wilds of Oregon County, locating near Alton. There he resides at the present time, and...

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Biography of William Henry Tester

William Henry Tester was born in Burgess Hill, a town nine miles north of Brighton, County of Sussex, England, on July 4, 1869. He received the common school education as given by the parochial schools under the care of the Church of England. Six years of his life were spent in Weston Super Mare, situated on the Bristol Channel in Somersetshire. As a boy of ten or twelve, reading of the wonderful things of America–her immense mountain ranges, her Great Lakes and wonderful Niagara Falls, and last but not least of that Great American Desert as shown on the maps of the late ’60s–a strong desire to become a partaker of the things offered by that promised land possessed him, and he often found himself gazing westward from the seashore watching the sun as it sank into the western sea, and saying to himself, “Some day I shall follow to that wonderful land of promise.” The father of the family also became interested, not for himself so much, as he often said, but that his children might come into that inheritance of better things that great English-speaking continent offered those who sought her shores with a desire for the really good things of life and were willing to do their part. William Tester, the father of William H., was born at Burgess Hill (St. John’s Common) August 4, 1840,...

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Biography of Wiley Terry Wisdom

Wiley Terry Wisdom, Vice President of the Exchange National Bank of Muskogee, was born in Jackson, Tennessee, February 22, 1875. His father, Colonel Dew M. Wisdom, was born at Medon, Madison County, Tennessee, February 3, 1836, and was a son of William S. and Jane (Anderson) Wisdom. The grandfather was born in Rockingham county, North Carolina, in 1796, and when Colonel Wisdom was still an infant he was taken by his parents to McNairy county, Tennessee. He completed his education in the Cumberland University at Lebanon and is numbered among its alumni of 1857. He early took up the study of Latin and in his college days studied Greek and French. He prepared for the bar as a student in Cumberland University and after being admitted to practice he opened an office in Purdy, Tennessee, where he followed his profession until the outbreak of the Civil war. He was unanimously chosen a member of the proposed constitutional convention which was never called into session, however, as the proposition was defeated by popular vote. When active hostilities began between the north and the south he joined Company F, Thirteenth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry, and was with the Confederate forces as a first lieutenant under Captain John V. Wright, whom he succeeded in the Captaincy when the latter was promoted to the rank of Colonel. While commanding his company at Belmont, Captain...

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Biography of Hon. George A. Neeley

Hon. George A. Neeley, of Hutchinson, is one of the younger men of Kansas, but had already gained distinction both in the law and business and as a valiant fighter for the cause of advanced principles in public affairs. Mr. Neeley came into special prominence not only in Kansas but over the nation during his two terms as congressman from the “Big Seventh” district. He was elected on the democratic ticket. In 1910 he was a candidate for the office against the redoubtable E. H. Madison. Madison was elected, but died in September, 1911, before finishing his term. At a special election on January 11, 1912, Mr. Neeley was chosen his successor for the term ending in March, 1913, and in 1912 was regularly elected to the sixty-third congress by the biggest majority received in that year by any congressional candidate, either republican or democratic, in the State of Kansas. In 1914 Mr. Neeley contested the nomination in the democratic primaries for the United States Senate. He had six opponents, but won the race. In the following election he was defeated on the face of the returns by Charles Curtis, though out of a total vote in the state of 527,000 the plurality of Curtis was only 3,896. While in Congress Mr. Neeley was especially prominent in banking legislation. He was a member of the Banking and Currency Committee...

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