Location: Jackson County OR

Biographical Sketch of William H. Pullen

William H. Pullen is one of the prominent men of Malheur County, being both a successful business man and property owner and popular County official. He was born in Illinois, on March 1, 1845, being the son of William and Mary (Weils) Pullen, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and Liverpool. When thirteen, he went with his parents to Texas, remaining there until 1867, and then returned to Illinois, where he engaged in farming until 1872. At that date a move was made to Pawnee County, Nebraska, and that was his home until 1880. He next located in Coos County, Oregon, where two years were spent and another move was made to Jackson County, whence one year later he returned to Coos bay and remained there five years. We next see Mr. Pullen in Wallowa County where he engaged in the mercantile pursuit at Lostine. Four years after this venture, he sold out and went to the lumbering business in Paradise, the same County. It was 1897, when Mr. Pullen came to Malheur County and bought one hundred and twenty acres of fertile land one-fourth of a mile from Owyhee. He has also eighty acres in Idaho and his land is well improved. In 1900 he was called by the people to act as County assessor, his name appearing on the Republican ticket and in the spring of 1902 he was...

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Biography of Cornelius G. Morehead

A native of the Web foot State, the son of about the earliest pioneers of this state, raised amid its environments, both eastern and western Oregon, the subject of this article is thoroughly an Oregonian and a typical representative of its energetic and progressive citizens. Cornelius G. was born in Linn County, Oregon, on June 26, 1865, being the son of Robert M. and Martha (Curl) Morehead. The parents came with ox teams to Oregon in 1848 and settled in the Willamette valley and the father being a millwright, built the first mill of the state. It was located at Salem and was built in 1849. In 1869, the family removed to Jackson County; Oregon, and in 1872, they came to Prairie City, Grant County, this state. There the father erected the Strawberry flour mills and in 1879 sold out and Went to Weiser, Idaho. He built a mill there and in 1887 he returned to the Willamette valley, where he died in 1890. Mrs. Morehead is still living in Douglas County, this state. Our subject was educated in the schools of the various places where lie lived and in 1884 he started for himself. He raised stock in Idaho until 1888, then sold out and came to Malheur County and engaged with the Oregon Horse and Land Company, where he wrought for a number of years. During this...

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Biographical Sketch of Isadore L. Poujade

This prominent citizen and leading stockman of Harney county is one of the men who deserves to be accorded space in the history of the county because of his worth, because of his uprightness, integrity and probity, and because of the excellent work that he has accomplished in the upbuilding and progress of the county. Mr. Poujade was born in Marion county, Oregon, on December 8, 1857, being the son of Andrew and Matilda (Clinger) Poujade. At the age of fifteen he went to Jackson county with his parents, with whom he resided until 1880. He gained his education in these places and also a wealth of excellent training in the practical walks of life and in raising stock and in farming. In 1880 he came to Harney valley and engaged as foreman for Todhunter & Devine. Six years were spent in this responsible position, and then he engaged in partnership with Charles W. Jones, in the stock business. They purchased what is known as the Cow creek ranch. This estate consists of eight hundred acres of fine meadow land, six miles east from Harney, and is improved with a fine dwelling of twelve rooms, good shop, barns, corralls, fences and all implements for handling a first-class stock and hay ranch. After the death of Mr. Jones Mr. Poujade purchased all the stock, but owns the ranch in partnership...

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Biography of Charles Nickell

CHARLES NICKELL. – Among the young men of ability and energy in the Pacific Northwest who have come to the front through their own efforts is the gentleman whose name is given above. He is a native of the Golden state, having been born at Yreka in 1856. The advantages for receiving an education in early days were not good; but, notwithstanding this fact, his natural push gave impetus to a spirit to improve each opportunity for storing his mind with that which would fit him for a sphere of usefulness in the future; and so well did he succeed that at the age of thirteen years he was assistant teacher at Yreka with Professor William Duenkal. In 1869 he quit that most trying of all pursuits, and in 1870 entered the office of the Yreka Journal, completing his printer’s apprenticeship in twenty months. In 1871 he permanently removed to Jacksonville, and worked as compositor and reporter on the Democratic Times until December, 1872, when, at the age of sixteen years, he formed a partnership with P.D. Hull, and launched out as a full-fledged journalist by the purchase of that paper. The great fire in 1873 swept away the office and entire plant in common with other buildings. But the Times existed in a few active brains, not simply in types and plates, and was running as lively as...

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Biography of Capt. Thomas Smith

CAPTAIN. THOMAS SMITH. – Captain Smith, the intrepid Indian fighter and pioneer, has seen the beginning of every Indian disturbance in Southern Oregon; and his narratives are therefore of peculiar interest. He was born September 14, 1809, in Campbell County, Kentucky. At the age of seventeen he removed with his recently widowed mother to Boone County, and learned the trade of a carpenter. In 1839 he went to Texas, and in 1849 formed a party designated as the Equal Rights Company, to cross the plains by the southern route via El Paso and the Gila River to California. The journey was notably difficult, chiefly from the excessive heat and lack of water. Captain Smith’s indomitable spirit had many occasions in which to be tested, as when he recovered a horse and mule from the Pima Indians on the Gila, or led his column – seventy-five men and two hundred and fifty animals – across the desert, following Colonel Crook’s trail by the animals of the government train which had died and had dried up by reason of the desert air, and finding water and grass on a sunken river and at a small lake. Arrived in California in the autumn, Captain Smith’s experiences in the mines at Dry Creek, Oroville, and on the Feather River, were of the checkered character of the argonauts, – more of sickness and ill...

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Biography of Harrison B. Oatman

HARRISON B. OATMAN. – This gentleman, a pioneer of the early days, and at present one of the capitalists of Portland, was born at Cortland, New York, in 1826. As a child he moved with his parents to Ohio, and at the new home in Bellevue attended school, laying a good foundation for his later study and information. At twelve he removed with his parents to Rockford, Illinois, and was married there in 1847 to Miss Lucena K. Ross. In 1853 he made with his family the toilsome journey to Oregon, crossing the plains with ox-teams, and establishing his home in Jackson County. The early days of his residence there were spent in mining, and in trading and packing. He was closely associated with the lamented Fields, whose massacre at the summit of the Siskiyou Mountains in 1853 was the real beginning of the general Indian war. Indeed, Mr. Oatman was a member of the party to which Fields belonged, and was with him on that lonely mountain; and by only a chance, running between the arrows, he escaped to the settlers and gave the alarm, in response to which a company was gathered and the mutilated body of Fields recovered. Mr. Oatman remained in Southern Oregon fourteen years, coming thence to Portland, where he has since resided. On arriving there he went into the grocery trade, which he...

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Biography of John Hailey

The well-known pioneer and statesman of Idaho from whom the town of Hailey takes its name, is now a resident of Bellevue, this state. He has been twice elected a delegate to congress from this territory, and is one of the best informed men in the state on national affairs. Mr. Hailey is a native of Smith County, Tennessee, born August 29, 1835, of Scottish ancestry and a descendant of a family long resident in the Old Dominion, his grandfather, Philip Hailey, and his father, John Hailey, having been both natives of Virginia. His father married Miss Nancy Baird, a native of Tennessee, the daughter of Captain Josiah Baird, who had been a captain in the war of 1812. Mr. Hailey received his education in the public schools. His father, with his family, removed to Dade County, Missouri, in 1848, and in 1853 young John crossed the plains to Oregon, as a member of the Tatum Company. When near the Platte a large company of Indians came upon them and made them give up the greater part of their provisions, leaving the emigrants short of everything excepting bread and tea. At Rock creek the Indians again swooped down upon them and stampeded their horses, after which they had to drive the one hundred head of cows they had on foot. The company arrived at Salem, Oregon, in October 1853,...

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Biography of Joseph Pinkham

Canada has furnished to the United States many bright, enterprising young men who have left the Dominion to enter the business circles of this country with its more progressive methods, livelier competition and advancement more quickly secured. Among this number is Mr. Pinkham. He has somewhat of the strong, rugged and persevering characteristics developed by his earlier environments, which, coupled with the livelier impulses of the New England blood of his ancestors, made him at an early day seek wider fields in which to give full scope to his ambition and industry his dominant qualities. He found the opportunity he sought in the freedom and appreciation of the growing western portion of the country. Though born across the border, he is thoroughly American in thought and feeling, and is patriotic and sincere in his love for the stars and stripes. His career is identified with the history of Idaho, where he has acquired a competence and where he is an honored and respected citizen. Thrice has he served as United States marshal of Idaho, and is accounted one of her bravest pioneers. Mr. Pinkham was born in Canada, on the 15th of December, 1833 and is a representative of an old New England family who were early settlers of Maine. The first of the name to come to America was Thomas Pinkham, a native of Wales, who established his...

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Biography of George O. Sampson

George O. Sampson, of Silver City, was born in Siskiyou, California, on the nth of December 1853, and is of English lineage, the original American ancestors of the family having settled in Maine on their emigration from the Old World. Jonathan Sampson, the father of our subject, was born in the Pine Tree state and engaged in the lumber business there. In 1850, however, he came to the Pacific coast and engaged in mining in California, also in lumbering in Siskiyou County. In 1855 he removed to Ashland, Oregon, and later took up his abode in Portland. He lived to a good old age and spent his last days at Garden City. His life was up-right and honorable, in harmony with his professions as a member of the Methodist church. His wife lived to be sixty-three years of age. They were the parents of six children, five of whom reached years of maturity, while four are still living. George O. Sampson acquired the greater part of his education in Portland, Oregon, and on putting aside his text-books became a mechanical engineer. His residence in Idaho dates from 1864. He worked on newspapers for some years and in 1871 came to Silver City, where he was employed as an engineer for about fifteen years, running some of the largest hoists in the camp. In 1893 he purchased the Silver City...

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Hearing, Mary E. – Obituary

Lostine, Wallowa County, Oregon Funeral services were held Sunday at 2:30 p.m. at the Lostine Christian church for Mary Elizabeth Hearing, Wallowa County pioneer, who died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Otto Dolkey near Medford, May 29, 1929. Rev. Arthur Harriman of Wallowa conducted the services. A quartet, Mrs. Orval McArtor, Mrs. Roy Haun, Roy Haun and Chas. Bridwell, sang appropriate hymns, with Mrs. S.L. Magill at the piano. Interment was in the Lostine cemetery. Mary Elizabeth Conner was born in Sigourney, Iowa, July 28, 1846, and crossed the plains to Portland, Oregon in 1853 at the age of seven years. She was united in marriage to George Hearing in 1865. To this union were born eleven children, seven of whom are still living. The children surviving the aged mother are Mrs. Alice Bayne of Bend, Oregon; Mrs. James Leeper, Mrs. Otto Dolkey in Medford, Oregon; Mrs. George Childers, Mrs. Oliver Wood of Lostine; George Hearing of Minam, and M.V. Hearing of Wallowa. All of them were present to pay their last respects to the memory of their mother. Mrs. Hearing was one among the early pioneers, having come to Wallowa county in 1884. She lived on a homestead, experiencing all the hardships of an unsettled land. She lived at different locations in the valley continuously for 41 years. Her husband preceded her in death April 27,...

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Childers, Robert – Obituary

Robert Childers, Artist, Dies Robert Edward Childers III, 60, an artist, who designed the Hobbie Holly cloth doll while on the staff of American Greetings Inc. in New York, died Saturday in Medford. Enturnment [sic – Interment] will be in Jacksonville Cemetery with Hillcrest Mortuary, Medford, in charge of arrangements. No service is planned. Mr. Childers was born Jan. 21, 1924, in Lostin [sic – Lostine], Ore. He attended Medford schools, graduating in 1941 from Medford High School. While a student he had small parts in early Oregon Shakespearean Festival productions in Ashland. Following graduation he served in the U.S. Navy for six years. He then attended school in Copa, Miami, Fla., Philadelphia Museum School of Art, and Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, from which he received his master’s degree. He received a gold medal upon graduating from the Museum School of Art and attended the Academy of Fine Arts on a Cresent scholarship. He also attended evening classes at Fleisher Memorial and performed for two years with the Philadelphia Dance Theater. His paintings – oil on canvas and wood – are exhibited in Philadelphia galleries, including three permanent exhibits in Wagner, Pa., and Minsky History of Theater. He was sponsored for three one-man shows in Philadelphia. While in Florida he worked for Ron Rico Rum. Following his studies, he worked in fabrics, film production, toys and illustrations for...

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Childers, Lucille C. (Sizemore) – Obituary

Former Wallowa County resident, Lucille C. Childers died July 11, 1996, at Medford. She was born May 16, 1911, at Milner, Idaho, the daughter of Frank O. and Rosella (Bennett) Sizemore. On June 6, 1929, she married Claire Childers at Enterprise. He preceded her in death on May 29, 1990. She is survived by sons, James Childers and Eugene Childers, both of Klamath Falls; sister, Ruth Bragg of Medford; grandchildren, and great grandchildren. Graveside services were held Monday, July 15, at 1 p.m. at the Enterprise Cemetery. Memorials may be made to the Enterprise Christian Church in care of the Bollman Funeral Home, 315 W. Main, Enterprise. Wallowa County Chieftain, Thursday, July 18, 1996, Page...

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Cole, Robert Lindford – Obituary

Robert Lindford Cole 1867 – 1950 Robert Lindford Cole was the son of Rev. William Person Cole Sr. AKA Wiley P. Cole and Catherine Lindord Misner Cole. In the early 1940’s the Enterprise Chieftain published articles concerning Wallowa County Pioneers still living in the area. At this time they interviewed Robert Cole and the following article was published as a result. It gives his complete history. Another Wallowa County resident who belongs in the ranks of the pioneers is Robert Lindord Cole of Enterprise who has resided in the county since 1880. Mr. Cole was born on May 5, 1867 in Johnson county, Nebraska, about then miles from the town of Tecumsch. His parents lived on a corn farm, which they had homesteaded in the early ’60’s. The lure of the West gripped them in the spring of 1880 and with four neighbor families they set out in a covered wagon for Walla Walla, Washington. The Cole family consisted of Robert’s parents and three brothers and one sister. The oldest boy was eighteen and Robert Cole the youngest of the boys, was 13. His sister was 11. The five-wagon train left Johnson county, Nebraska, on April 20, 1880. During most of the trip Robert walked behind the wagons carrying a double barreled shotgun with which he managed to shoot enough ducks, grouse, sage hens, and rabbits to keep all...

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McCully, John W. – Obituary

John W. McCully born. 22 May 1821 New Brunswick; died 20 Jan 1899 Joseph, OR – 67 years 7 months 28 days. In 1822 the family moved to OH, stayed until 1844; 1844-1851 in IA; 1852-1862 resident of Jacksonville, OR; 1862-1867 visited Idaho, Montana, and Missouri – attended medical school in St. Louis. He had studied medicine and become a practitioner in IA. 1868-1878 purser on Willamette River steamboats; 1880-1889, resident of Joseph, OR. He was a member of the last Territorial Legislature, representing Jackson Co. Held “high positions” in the Masons. Obituary (1899) from unidentified newspaper. Contributed By:Sandy...

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Garrett, Richard R. – Obituary

Funeral services for Richard R. Garrett of Medford who passed away Monday will be held today at 3 o’clock at Hillcrest Memorial Park in Medford. Mr. Richard F Genaw will officiate. Conger-Morris Funeral Directors of Medford are in charge of arrangements. Mr. Garrett was born April 8, 1898 in Flora, Oregon the son of the late Brock and Edith Garrett. On Aug 7, 1931 he married the former Bessie Falvey who survives. He served in the army in World War I. He had lived in the Medford area for 50 years and was engaged in the logging business. Survivors, besides his wife include one son Richard P. Garrett, Bellevue Wash. One daughter Heloyse Burk, Portland: one Sister Velma Osborne, La Grande; four grandchildren. Three brothers and two sisters preceded him in death. Contributed by Julie...

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