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Location: Ipswich Massachusetts

Ancestors of Charles W. Milliken of Barnstable, MA

CHARLES WARREN MILLIKEN, M. D., of Barnstable, Barnstable Co., Mass., engaged as a general practitioner of medicine, has high professional and social connections which have brought him a wide acquaintance. The Millikens, though not one of the oldest Colonial families, have become allied with the posterity of the most distinguished early settlers, and the Doctor traces his line back to many whose names are suggestive of the interesting and important events of the ancient history of this region. There follows in chronological order from the first known American ancestor the genealogical and family history of his branch of the Milliken family.

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Descendants of Richard Kimball of Ipswich MA

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now KIMBALL. Richard Kimball, of the parish of Rattlesden, County of Suffolk, England, with his family, came to New England in the ship “Elizabeth” in 1634, arriving at Boston, and thence went to Watertown, Mass. He soon became a prominent and active man in the new settlement, was proclaimed a freeman in 1635, and was proprietor in 1636-37. Soon thereafter he removed to Ipswich, where he passed the remainder of his life. His services as a wheelwright were very much appreciated. Mr. Kimball married Ursula, daughter of Henry Scott, of Rattlesden, and (second) Oct. 25, 1661, Mrs. Margaret Dow, of Hampton, N. H. He died June 22, 1675. His widow died March 1, 1676. His children, all by the first marriage, and all born in England except the youngest child, were: Abigail, Henry, Elizabeth, Richard, Mary, Martha, John, Thomas and Sarah. Richard Kimball (2), son of Richard, was born in Rattlesden, England, about 1623. He came to New England with his parents. He removed from Ipswich to Wenham, near Ladd’s Hill, in the western part of the town, and became a large land owner. He was a subscriber to the minister’s rate in 1657; Dec. 4, 1660, he was on the committee to see about building the new meetinghouse, and in 1663 was on the committee to...

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Archer Family of Fall River, MA

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now ARCHER (Fall River family). Through much of the nineteenth century the name opening this article was a most highly esteemed and respected one at Fall River, made so by the lives of the late Jason H. Archer, M. D., of the medical profession, and his son, the late John Jason Archer, Esq., for years one of the learned members of the Fall River bar. The home at least for a time of this Fall River Archer family was in the nearby town of Wrentham, in Norfolk county, where lived Amos Archer, father of Dr. Jason H. Archer and grandfather of the late John Jason Archer, Esq. While the Wrentham vital records do not show the Archers among the town’s early inhabitants the Archers as a family were here in Massachusetts in its early Colonial period. One Samuel Archer (name spelled in the early Essex county records Arehard) was living in Salem as early as 1630, as on Oct, 19th of that year he took the freeman’s oath there. He was born between 1602 and 1615, and was a carpenter. He was a member of the First Church before 1636; was constable of the town in 1657; and marshal from 1654 until his decease. He died in December, 1667. His wife Susanna survived him, and married (second)...

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Descendants of Frederick Packard of Brockton, MA

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now FREDERICK PACKARD, late of Brockton, was not only one of the best known men in the line of shoe manufacturing in that city but also one of its most honorable and respected citizens. He ranked among the city’s most successful business men, one whose start in life was obtained by his energy and push, and these traits, combined with excellent business acumen, had long secured for him a position of affluence, and caused the firm of which he had so long been the head to become...

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Appleton Family Genealogy of Saco Valley Maine

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The Appleton family were residents at Great and Little Waldingford, in Suffolk, England, from a remote period. A John Appleton died at the former place in 1436. Samuel Appleton, descended from this race, came to New England in 1635, and settled at Ipswich; was admitted freeman in May, 1636, and was representative at the May and September sessions of the General Court, in 1637. He was born at Little Waldingford in 1586; died in Ipswich in June, 1670, leaving John, Samuel, Judith, and Martha. John Appleton, b. at Little Waldingford, in 1622, was representative for Ipswich for nineteen years. He was fined and imprisoned under the administration of Sir Edmund Andros, for resisting the principles of taxation without representation; one of the first to take this stand in the colonies. He m. Priscilla, dau. of Rev. Jesse Glover, by whom he had John and Jesse. He d. in 1700, aged 78. John Appleton, b. 1652, was a councilor under the Charter of William and Mary, and twenty years a judge of probate for Essex county, Mass. He m. Elizabeth, dau. of President Rogers, and d. in 1739, leaving issue. Jesse Appleton, bro. of preceding, b. 1660, was a merchant in Boston; d. in 1721. Rev. Nathaniel Appleton, son of John, b. Dec. 9, 1693; grad. at...

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Will Of Lionell Chute

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The will of Lionell Chute of Ipswich, dated 4: 7 mo: 1644, was proved in court at Ipswich 7: 9 mo: 1645. The original instrument has not been found, and the following copy is from the record in Ipswich deeds, book i, leaf 15. The fourth day of the eleventh month Anno Dm 1644 I Lionell Chute of the Towne of Ipfwch in New England Schoolmafter doe make & ordayne this my laft will & Teftament (revoking all form wills by me made.) Item I give vntd Rofe my wife for terme of her naturall life, all this my dwelling howfe with the Barne &all the edifices: (the two chambers over the howfe & entry only excepted which I will that James my fonne fhall have to his only vfe for the Terme of one yeare next after my deceafe with free ingreffe, egreffe, & regreffe & wth the yards, gardens, the home-lott & planting lott purchaffed of Mr. Bartlemew with the Comonage and appurtenances therevnto belonging. And after my wives deceafe; I give the faid howfe, barne, lotts & premiffes with all thappurtenances vnto James Chute my fonne & to his heires. Item I give vnto my faid fonne James Chute & to his heires for ever all & fingular my other lands, lotts, meadow...

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Genealogy of the Adams Family

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Jonas Adams married Sarah Jefferds (both of Salem) (published July 5, 1729), and lived in Salem. His will was made Dec. 22, 1756; and proved May 16, 1757. He was a mariner, and after his death his widow conducted an inn. Her will was made March 20, 1780; and proved July 12, 1786. Children: Elizabeth Adams, baptized in First church Jan. 30, 1731-2 ; married Caleb Griffith of Salem April 24, 1755; and died before 1780. Sarah Adams, baptized in First church Jan. 30, 1731-2; d. young. Samuel Adams, baptized in First church March l0, 1733-4; and probably died before 1756. Sarah Adams, baptized in First church March 21, 1735-6; married Jacob Bacon Sept. 16, 1790. Jonas Adams, baptized in First church March 26, 17378; was living in 1756 ; and died before 1780. William Adams, baptized in First church May 18, 1740; married Mary Flynt of Salem March 24, 1763; and had children living in 1780, when he was probably deceased. Daniel Adams, baptized in First church May 16, 1742; married Hepzibah Batchelder of Beverly March 14, 1773; and lived in Beverly. He was a master mariner; and from 1777 to 1781 he owned the Joseph Symonds place in Boxford. Children, born in Beverly: Josiah Batchelder Adams, born Oct. 27, 1774; died at sea. Daniel...

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Will Of Robert Hunter

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The will of Robert Hunter, dated 5: 6mo: 1647, was proved in the Ipswich court 28: 7: 1647. The following copy is taken from the record contained in the Ipswich Deeds, volume 1, leaf 25, the original being missing. This 5th of the 6th month 1647. I Robert Hunter weak of body but of pfect memory prayfed be god doe make & ordayne this to be my laft will & Teftament. firft all my debts being paid I leave my howfe & lott to my wife Mary Hunter for Terme of her life. Item all my goods within the howfe I give to my wife Item I give unto Thomas Birkby one little Browne Heffer that corns two yeares and my fhop geare Item I give unto fome poore in the Church of Rowley ten pounds to be paid out of two mares of which ten pounds ten shillings I give to Richard Clarke Ite ten shillings to John Dresfer Item to John Burbant 108. Item to William Jackson 106. Item to Jane Grant I give 108. Item to Sifly wood 108. Item 301 to Margaret Crosfe 108. Item I give to William Stickne 208. & all my workiday clothes Item to Thomas Elethorp 108. Item I give to mris Shove 408 which I desire may...

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Will Of Richard Bartlett

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The nuncupative will of Richard Bartlett, sr., of Newbury, was proved in the Ipswich court 28: 7: 1647. The following is a copy of the same as recorded in the Ipswich Deeds, volume I, leaf 25. The testimony of William Titcombe & Anthony Somersby concerning the last will & testament of Richard Bartlett fen of Newbury deceased the 20th of May 1647. About a month before he deceased we being with him & two of his sonnes being prfent he being very ill & had been weak all the spring finding in himself that he was not like to continue he desired us to take notice what his mind was concerning that small estate he had how he would dispose of it. As for his son John Bartlett he had done for him more then for the rest of his children & at that time did not dispose any to him. To his sonne Christofer Bartlett he did bequeath the debt which lately he had borrowed of him which was five bushels of wheat if foe be it should please the lord to take him away at this sickness or else if he should lye long visited his necessity would require that he should pay it again. To his daughter Johan wife of William Titcomb he...

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Biography of Francis M. Perkins

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Francis M. Perkins, president of the Perkins Trust Company of Lawrence, had been a prominent factor in financial and business affairs of that city and of the state at large for more than forty years. He was the first of his family to come to Kansas. Mr. Perkins was born in Racine County, Wisconsin, on a farm June 21, 1846. His parents were Otis Goodspeed and Julia Ann (Bender) Perkins. His father was a descendant of John W. Perkins of Ipswich, Massachusetts, who came to Massachusetts Colony in 1631 and was originally from Ufton Court, the large family estate of Berkshire, England. A large part of this old English estate is still owned by a member of the family. For fully 200 years the Perkins family lived in Connecticut and from that point they spread westward to New York and thence to Wisconsin. Mr. Perkins’ parents were among the pioneers of Southern Wisconsin, locating there when Wisconsin was still a territory. Francis M. Perkins is a brother of the late Lucius H. Perkins, the distinguished lawyer of Lawrence whose career is sketched on other pages. Francis M. Perkins grew up on a Wisconsin farm, and his people being well to do he was given a liberal education. He spent two years in Beloit College, was a...

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Agawam Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Agawam Indians (Agawom) (fish-curing [place]), Hewitt. A name of frequent occurrence in south New England and on the Long Island, and by which was designated at least 3 Indian villages or tribes in Massachusetts. The most important was at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. The site was sold by the chief in 1638. Its jurisdiction included the land on Newbury River, and the tribe was a part of the Pennacook confederacy. It was almost extinct in 1658, but as late as 1726 there were still 3 families living near Wigwam hill. The second tribe or band of that name had its chief town on Long hill, near Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts. Springfield was sold in 1635 and the Indian town was in existence in 1675. This tribe was commonly classed with the Pacomtuc. The third tribe or band was about Wareham, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, the site of which was sold in 1655. It was probably subject to the Wampanoag, but joined in the plot against the English in...

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Biography of William Tuttle

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The word Tuthill, meaning a conical hill, is a common place name in England, of remote antiquity. From one or more places named Tuthill the surname Tuthill or Tuttle is derived, after a prevalent custom in the twelfth century and later when surnames came into use in England. The family had been especially prominent in Devonshire, England. There came to America in 1635, in the ship “Planter,” three families of this name from the parish of St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England. John, William, and Richard Tuttle, the heads of these families, were doubtless brothers. John Tuttle, mercer, aged thirty-nine, according to the passenger list, in 1635, settled at Ipswich, Massachusetts; was in Ireland in 1654, and probably fell sick there, for his wife went to Carrickfergus, Ireland, and wrote April 6, 1657, that he died there, December 30, 1656. Richard Tuttle, aged forty-two, settled in Boston, where he died May 8, 1640. Henry Tuttle was in Hingham, Massachusetts, in 1635, coming with his brother John; Henry removed to Southold, Long Island, John returned to England, and settled at Weybread, Suffolk county. Still another John Tuttle came in the ship “Angel Gabriel” and settled in Dover, New Hampshire. (I) William Tuttle, immigrant ancestor, came from St. Albans parish, Hertfordshire, England, on the ship “Planter,” in April, 1635, with...

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