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Location: Indian Territory

Muster Roll of a Detachment of Georgia Cavalry Mounted Riflemen

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Muster Roll of a Detachment of Georgia Cavalry Mounted Riflemen under my command stationed at Fort Mitchell, Hartford and on an Indian Scout from the 9th of November to the 22d of December 1814. Both dates included. Allen Tooke, Co. Lt., commencement of service Nov. 9, 1814; expiration of service Nov. 22, 1817; stationed Ft. Mitchell. Captain, R. H. Thomas 1st Lt. Jas. L. Perry 2nd Lt. Furney F. Gatlin Private Thos. Sutton 1st Sergts. Thos. J. Johnson Jos. B. Colson Hardy Gatlin Jacob Watson Corporals James W. Shines John Jones B. J. Thomas Chas. Carden Privates Isham Adams Dennis Adams Bartlett Barker (extra services as Sergeant Major) Elijah Barker John Bird Bartlett Brown John Bush Moses Brian John Brown William Brian Matthias H. Beard John Bradshaw Thomas Carden James Crawford Noah Cole David Cumming Robert Daniel Win. Davidson Jordan Deese (lost a bayonet in Flint river) James A. Everett Moses Franklin Solomon Franklin Thomas Folsome Wm. Folsoine Obadiah Garrett I. Gilstrap Jeremiah Gilstrap Joshua Harris James Holly Benjamin Howell Stephens Hagens Eli Horn Absolom Holsom Aaron Johnson John Jean James Ivey Daniel Kirklen Washington Lancaster William Lions George Little Wright Lancaster Christopher McRae Matthias McCormic John McCormic Elisha Morgan Benj. Newton Spice Mill John Mayo Charles Mayo William Mayo Henry Moses Jesse Moses Gilbert McNear...

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Slave Narrative of Matilda Poe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Matilda Poe Location: McAlester, Oklahoma Age: 80 I was born in Indian Territory on de plantation of Isaac Love. He was old Master, and Henry Love was young Master. Isaac Love was a full blood Chickasaw Indian but his wife was a white woman. Old Master was sure good to his slaves. The young niggers never done no heavy work till day was fully grown. Dey would carry water to de men in de field and do other light jobs ’round de place. De Big House set way back from de road ’bout a quarter of a mile. It was a two-story log house, and the rooms was awful big and they was purty furniture in it. The furniture in de parlor was red plush and I loved to slip in and rub my hand over it, it was so soft like. The house was made of square logs and de cracks was filled out even with the edges of de logs. It was white washed and my but it was purty. They was a long gallery clean across de front of de house and big posts to support de roof. Back a ways from de house was de kitchen and nearby was de smokehouse. Old Master kept it well filled with meat, lard...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Grayson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Mary Grayson Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 83 I am what we colored people call a “native.” That means that I didn’t come into the Indian country from somewhere in the Old South, after the war, like so many Negroes did, but I was born here in the old Creek Nation, and my master was a Creek Indian. That was eighty three years ago, so I am told. My mammy belonged to white people back in Alabama when she was born, down in the southern part I think, for she told me that after she was a sizeable girl her white people moved into the eastern part of Alabama where there was a lot of Creeks. Some of them Creeks was mixed up with the whites, and some of the big men in the Creeks who come to talk to her master was almost white, it looked like. “My white folks moved around a lot when I was a little girl”, she told me. When mammy was about 10 or 12 years old some of the Creeks begun to come out to the Territory in little bunches. They wasn’t the ones who was taken out here by the soldiers and contractor men, they come on ahead by themselves and most of them had plenty of...

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Slave Narrative of Henry F. Pyles

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Henry F. Pyles Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Date of Birth: August 15, 1856 Age: 81 That’s how the niggers say old Bab Russ used to make the hoodoo “hands” he made for the young bucks and wenches, but I don’t know. ’cause I was too trusting to look inside de one he make for me, and anyways I lose it, and it no good nohow! Old Bab Russ live about two mile from me, and I went to him one night at midnight and ask him to make me de hand. I was a young strapper about sixteen years old, and thinking about wenches pretty hard and wanting something to help me out wid the one I liked best. Old Bab Russ charge me four bits for dat hand, and I had to give four bits more for a pint of whiskey to wet it wid, and it wasn’t no good nohow! Course dat was five-six years after de war. I wasn’t yet quite eleven when de war close. Most all the niggers was farming on de shares and whole lots of them was still working for their old Master yet. Old Bab come in there from deep South Carolina two-three years befo’ and live all by hisself. De gal I was worrying about had...

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Slave Narrative of Anthony Dawson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Anthony Dawson Location: 1008 E. Owen St., Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 105 “Run nigger, run, De Patteroll git you! Run nigger, run, De Patteroll come! “Watch nigger, Watch- De Patteroll trick you! Watch nigger, watch, He got a big gun!” Dat one of the songs de slaves all knowed, and de children down on de “twenty acres” used to sing it when dey playing in de moonlight ’round de cabins in de quarters. Sometime I wonder iffen de white folks didn’t make dat song up so us niggers would keep in line. None of my old Master’s boys tried to git away ‘cepting two. and dey met up wid evil, both of ’em. One of dem niggers was fotching a bull-tongue from a piece of new ground way at de back of de plantation, and bringing it to my pappy to git it sharped. My pappy was de blacksmith. Dis boy got out in de big road to walk in de soft send, and long come a wagon wid a white overseer and five, six, niggers going somewhar, Dey stopped and told dat boy to git in and ride. Dat was de last anybody seem him. Dat overseer and another one was cotched after awhile, and showed up to be underground railroaders. Dey would take...

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Slave Narrative of Nellie Johnson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Nellie Johnson Location: Oklahoma I don’t know how old I is, but I is a great big half grown gal when the time of the war come, and I can remember how everything look at that time, and what all the people do, too. I’m pretty nigh to blind right now, and all I can do is set on this little old front porch and maybe try to keep the things picked up behind my grandchild and his wife, because she has to work and he is out selling wood most of the time. But I didn’t have to live in any such a house during the time I was young like they is, because I belonged to old Chief Rolley McIntosh, and my pappy and mammy have a big, nice, clean log house to live in, and everything round it look better than most renters got these days. We never did call old Master anything but the Chief or the General for that’s what everybody called him in them days, and he never did act towards us like we was slaves, much anyways. He was the mikko of the Kawita town long before the war and long before I was borned, and he was the chief of the Lower Creeks even before he...

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Slave Narrative of Harriett Robinson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Harriet Robinson Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Bastrop, Texas Date of Birth: September 1, 1842 Age: 95 I was born close to Webbers Falls, in the Canadian District of the Cherokee Nation, in the same year that my pappy was blowed up and killed in the big boat accident that killed my old Master. I never did see my daddy excepting when I was a baby and I only know what my mammy told me about him. He come from across the water when he was a little boy, and was grown when old Master Joseph Vann bought him, so he never did learn to talk much Cherokee. My mammy was a Cherokee slave, and talked it good. My husband was a Cherokee born Negro, too, and when he got mad he forgit all the English he knowed. Old Master Joe had a mighty big farm and several families of Negroes, and he was a powerful rich man. Pappy’s name was Kalet Vann, and mammy’s name was Sally. My brothers was name Sone and Frank. I had one brother and one sister sold when I was little and I don’t remember the names. My other sisters was Polly, Ruth and Liddie. I had to work in the kitchen when I was a...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Lindsay

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Mary Lindsay Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Date of Birth: September 20, 1845 Age: 91 My slavery, days wasn’t like most people tell you about. ’cause I was two to my young Mistress and cont away to have when I was jest a little girl. and I didn’t live on a big plantation a very long time. I got an old family Bible what ray I war born on September 20, in 1845 but I don’t know who yut he writing in it unclear it was my mammy’s witness. My mammy had de book when she die. My mammy come out to the Indian country from Eiariy two years before I was born. She was try slave of a Chicasaw part-breed name Sobe Love. He was the kinsfolks of Mr. Eenjamin Love, and Mr. Henry Love what bring the big bunches of the Chickasaws out from Mississipi to the Choctaw country when the Chickasaws sign my do trouty to leave Mississippi, and the whole Love family settle ’round on the Red River below Fort Washita. There that I was born. My mammy any dey have a terrible have time again the sickness when they first come out into that country, because it was low and swampy and all full of came brakes, and everybody have the...

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Slave Narrative of Joanna Draper

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Joanna Draper Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Hazelhurst Mississippi Age: 83 Most folks can’t remember many things happened to ’em when they only eight years old, but one of my biggest tribulations come about dat time and I never will forget it! That was when I was took away from my own mammy and pappy and sent off and bound out to another man, way off two-three hundred miles away from whar I live. And dat’s the last time I ever see either one of them, or any my own kinfolks! Whar I was born was at Hazelhurst. Mississippi. Jest a little piece east of Hazelhurst, close to the Pearl River, and that place was a kind of new plantation what my Master, Dr. Alexander, bought when he moved into Mississippi from up in Virginia awhile before the war. They said my mammy brings me down to Mississippi, and I was born jest right after she got there. My mammy’s name was Margaret, and she was born under the Ramson’s, back in Tennessee. She belonged to Dave Ramson, and his pappy had come to Tennessee to settle on war land, and he had knowed Dr. Alexander’s people back in Virginia too. My pappy’s name was Addison. end he always belonged to Dr. Alexander....

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Slave Narrative of Betty Robertson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Betty Robertson Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Age: 93 I was born close to Webbers Falls, in the Canadian District of the Cherokee Nation, in the same year that my pappy was blowed up and killed in the big boat accident that killed my old Master. I never did see my daddy excepting when I was a baby and I only know what my mammy told me about him. He come from across the water when he was a little boy, and was grown when old Master Joseph Vann bought him, so he never did learn to talk much Cherokee. My mammy was a Cherokee slave, and talked it good. My husband was a Cherokee born Negro, too, and when he got mad he forgit all the English he knowed. Old Master Joe had a mighty big farm and several families of Negroes, and he was a powerful rich man. Pappy’s name was Kalet Vann, and mammy’s name was Sally. My brothers was name Sone and Frank. I had one brother and one sister sold when I was little and I don’t remember the names. My other sisters was Polly, Ruth and Liddie. I had to work in the kitchen when I was a gal, and they was ten or twelve children smaller than me...

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Slave Narrative of Allen V. Manning

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Allen V. Manning Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Clarke County Mississippi Date of Birth: 1850 Age: 87 Occupation: Sells Milk I always been somewhar in the South, mostly in Texas when I was a young man, and of course us Negroes never got much of a show in court matters, but I reckon if I had of had the chance to set on a jury I would of made a mighty poor out at it. No sir. I jest can’t set in judgement on nobody, ’cause I learned when I was jest a little boy that good people and bad people, makes no difference which, jest keep on living and doing like they been taught, and I jest can’t seen to blame them none for what they do iffen they been taught that way. I was born in slavery, and I belonged to a Baptist preacher. Until I was fifteen years old I was taught that I was his own chattel-property, and he could do with me like he wanted to, but he had been taught that way too, and we both believed it. I never did hold nothing against him for being hard on Negroes sometimes, and I don’t think I ever would of had any trouble even if I had of...

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Slave Narrative of Nancy Rogers Bean

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Nancy Rogers Bean Location: Hulbert, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Boggy Depot, Oklahoma Age: 82 I’m getting old and it’s easy to forget most of the happenings of slave days; anyway I was too little to know much about them, for my mammy told me I was born about six years before the war. My folks was on their way to Fort Gibson, and on the trip I was born at Boggy Depot, down in southern Oklahoma. There was a lot of us children; I got their names somewheres here. Yes, there was George, Sarah, Emma, Stella, Sylvia, Lucinda, Rose, Den, Pamp, Jeff, Austin, Jessie, Isaac and Andrew: we all lived in a one room log cabin on Master Rogers’ place not far from the old military road near Choteau. Mammy was raised around the Cherokee town of Tahlequah. I got my name from the Rogers, but I was loaned around to their relatives most of the time. I helped around the house for Bill McCracken, then I was with Cornelius and Carline Wright, and when I was freed my Mistress was a Mrs. O’Neal, wife of a officer at Fort Gibson. She treated me the best of all and gave me the first doll I ever had. It was a rag doll with charcoal...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Susie D. Coats

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Coats, Mrs. Susie D. (See Grant and Hildebrand) —Susie Dora, daughter of James and Emily (Harlin) Sunday was born in Cooweescoowee District, September 12, 1876, educated in Female Seminary. Married September 11, 1893 James, son of James McKenzie and Annie C. (Spears) Coats, born April 1, 1866. They are the parents of: Jennie Bessie, born January 25, 1894; James McKenzie, born September 20, 1896; Elmer Earl, born September 4, 1901; Capitola Wyly, born February 15, 1903; Lulu May, born January 20, 1906; Eugene born October 15, 1908: Belva Lockwood, born June 8, 1910 and David Coats, born March 3, 1912. Mr. Coats died December 15, 1915. Mrs. Coats manages a farm near Pryor. Miss Jennie Bessie Coats was elected Court Clerk of Mayes County November 5, 1918 and November 2, 1920. James McKenzie was educated in Pryor and Agricultural College at Stillwater and served in the World War over seas 18 months. Capitola Wyly is a member of the 1922 High School class at Pryor. Lucinda, daughter of Samuel and Catherine (Hildebrand) Martin married Joseph Spears and they were the parents of Annie C. Spears wife of James McKenzie...

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Biography of Samuel Sixkiller

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Grant, Foreman and Sixkiller) Gu-o-tsa Smith, a half breed Cherokee woman of the Paint Clan, married Sixkiller, a full blooded Cherokee. Their son, Red Bird Sixkiller, married Pamelia Whaley, a White woman, and they in turn were the parents of Samuel Sixkiller who married Fannie Foreman; and Lucas Sixkiller who married Emma Blythe. Samuel and Fannie (Foreman) Sixkiller were the parents of Samuel Rasmus Sixkiller, born February 13, 1877, and graduated from Carlisle University in 1895. Lucas and Emma (Blythe) Sixkiller were the parents of Mattie B. Sixkiller, born December 14, 1874, in Delaware District; and she married on June 26, 1911, Samuel Sixkiller. Absalom Blythe married Mary J. Milisap, and they were the parents of Emma Blythe who married Lucas Sixkiller. Thomas Foreman married Elizabeth Chicken and they were the parents of Fannie Foreman, who married Samuel Sixkiller. Red Bird Sixkiller was a man of sterling personality; he was born in the old Cherokee Nation. When he was about eleven years old he attended a school some seven miles from his home and had to go over a point of Lookout Mountain to get to school. It was necessary for him to start before daylight to get to school before it opened. One morning he was going over this point of Lookout Mountain when...

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Treasurers of the Cherokee Nation

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The office of treasurer was provided for by article four, section twenty one of the constitution, as follows: “The treasurer of the Cherokee Nation shall be chosen by a joint vote of both branches of the National Council for the term of four years.” The annual salary was fixed on October 4, 1839 at five hundred dollars. David Vann 1839, 1843, 1847 and 1851; Lewis Ross 1855 and 1859: Springfrog 1867, he died and Clement Neeley Vann was elected in November 1870; Dennis Wolf Bushyhead 1871 and 1875; De Witt Clinton Lipe November 11, 1879; Henry Chambers 1883; Robert Bruce Ross January 19, 1888; Colonel Johnson Harris, November 6, 1891, he was elected Principal Chief on December 23, 1891 and Ezekial Eugene Starr was elected as his successor on the same day; DeWitt Clinton Lipe November 14, 1895; Joseph Martin LaHay, November 17, 1800 Dr. Jesse Crary Bushyhead...

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