Location: Indian Territory

Biography of Judge James M. Shackelford

This eminent soldier and judge was born July 7, 1827, in Lincoln County, Ky., the seventh son of Edmond Shackelford and Susan Thompson, both of Virginia. At the age of twelve years he was placed at Stanford University, Kentucky, for two years, after which he became a pupil of the celebrated teacher, James F. Barber. In 1848, under the last requisition of the government, he was elected by a company in Washington County, Kentucky, as lieutenant, and received a first lieutenant’s commission from the government, in Company I, of the Fourth Kentucky regiment of infantry, which was commanded by John S. Williams, of Kentucky, in 1847. Going out as he did, under the last requisition, he saw no fighting during the campaign, which was a grievous disappointment to a young man of his ardent and ambitious disposition. On his return he studied law under Judge J. P. Cook and was admitted to the bar, becoming a partner of Cook’s in a few years. They practiced together until the outbreak of the Civil War, when James Shackelford raised the Twenty-fifth Kentucky Regiment of Infantry, and was made colonel of the same. He was in the engagement at Fort Donaldson with that regiment, but, through exposure, lost his health and was obliged to resign his office in 1862. Some time afterward President Lincoln issued him special orders to raise a regiment...

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Biography of Capt. George W. Grayson

The subject of this sketch, George W. Grayson, was born in 1843, within four miles of Eufaula, Creek Nation. He is a son of the late James Grayson and Jennie Wynn, a half-breed Creek. The original name of Grayson was Grierson, having become corrupted in some unaccountable manner. The original Grierson was a Scotchman, reputed to have come from the city of Edinburgh, Scotland. He married a Creek woman of the Hillabee Town, who bore him several children, among whom was the grand-parent of the subject of our sketch. George W. was the first-born of his family, and his parents, being great admirers of literary attainments, persisted in keeping him and his brother “Sam” at such schools as the nation could afford, in preference to holding them at home, where, by assisting on the farm, they could have materially lightened the parental burden. In the course of time these young men became recognized among the most advanced pupils in the old Asberry Manual Labor School, close to Eufaula. George W. was finally singled out by the nation as most worthy of the superior advantages afforded by the schools in the States, and, thus favored at the expense of the nation, was placed at Arkansas College, Fayetteville, where he remained two years, until the outbreak of the Civil War. His father died about this time, and George W. joined, as...

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Biography of W. E. Gentry

W. E. Gentry was born March 11, 1842. He is the second son of James Gentry, of Alabama, and grandson of Elijah Gentry, a white man who married a full-blood Catawba Indian, and Miss Caroline Bush, a United States citizen. William was sent to school for a short time in Mississippi, and then moved to the Creek Nation, in 1855, with his father and mother. Here he went to Asberry Mission, Eufaula, for one year, after which he commenced agriculture with his father, continuing until the outbreak of the war, when he joined the Confederates under Colonel Chily McIntosh, Second Creek Regiment. During the last year his company was transferred to Jumper’s regiment, Seminole Nation. At the termination of the war, Mr. Gentry came back to his father’s home, where he assisted him on the farm. In 1867 he married Miss Sarah Crestmond, who died in 1868. In 1872 he married Miss Martha Lynch, who died September 3, 1873. The issue of this marriage was one boy, named Albert James, born August 27, 1873, and died February 2, 1891. On August 11, 1878, he married Miss Sallie D. Carr, eldest daughter of Chipley Carr, by whom he has six children, William, born August 13, 1879; Caroline, born April 21, 1881; Mary E., born April 24, 1883; Sallie P., born May 29, 1885; Bobby Lee, born September 15, 1887; Bluford,...

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Biography of Judge James M. Keys

Judge James M. Keys was born March 25, 1845, son of Louis Keys, who came from the old State in 1828 and settled on the Illinois River near Tahlequah. His mother was Catherine McDaniels, daughter to James McDaniels, of Irish descent. William Keys, the grandfather to James M., was a United States citizen of Scotch-Irish blood. James was educated at the Tahlequah schools, and at sixteen years of age enlisted in Captain Tennent’s company, Fourth Arkansas, serving three months and twenty days, when he joined Stand Watie’s First Cherokee Regiment, and remained with them until the termination of the war. He was present at Pea Ridge, Wilson Creek, Elk Horn, Honey Springs and Cabin Creek, as well as lesser engagements. After the war James Keys went into mercantile business with William Keys at Gibson Station, Indian Territory, and continued it for seven years. He had in the meantime served as deputy sheriff of Coowescoowee for two terms. In 1879 he was elected prosecuting attorney for the same district, and served two years. He was re-elected in 1883 and served until 1885. In 1882 he became town commissioner, and held that office for one year. In 1885 Mr. Keys was elected supreme judge and chief justice of the Cherokee Nation. Serving in this capacity three years, he was re-elected and held the office until November 1891, when he was called...

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Biography of Jas. O. Callaghan, M.D.

The subject of this sketch was born November 1860, at Sulphur Springs, Texas. He is the eldest son of Judge S. B. Callaghan, present Chief Justice of the Creek Nation, who is the son of Oliver Callaghan of Scott county, Pennsylvania. Mrs. S. B. Callaghan (Dr. Callaghan’s mother) is the daughter of Rev. Wm. Thornburg, a minister of the Methodist Church, who came from Mississippi to Texas and died in that State about the year 1845. Up to the age of fourteen James received his schooling at Sulphur Springs public school, after which he went to the Alley High School, Jefferson, Texas. Here he remained two terms, when he commenced studying medicine and serving his apprenticeship in the drug business. After two years spent in this manner, he entered the business in Springfield, Mo., and there continued until 1882, when he became traveling agent for A. A. Mellier, wholesale druggist. In the fall of 1883 he took a course of lectures at Missouri Medical College, and in June of the same year married Miss Josie E. Tarpley, of Murphysboro, Tenn. In the spring of 1884 he returned to the Creek Nation (Muskogee), where he built a home for himself and began the practice of medicine. After some time Dr. Callaghan returned to St. Louis, and taking another course of lectures, graduated in the spring of 1886. In 1890 he...

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Biographical Sketch of Ellis M. Alberty

Ellis M. Alberty was born May 4, 1854, in Going Snake district, the son of Moses Alberty (a Georgian, who settled in this nation in 1832) and Elizabeth Buffington, daughter of Ellis Buffington. Ellis, while but six years of age, commenced attending school at Prairie Grove, but after the outbreak of the war refugeed with his parents near Goodwater, Choctaw Nation. Here Ellis visited the mission school off and on until 1866, when his family returned to the home place in Going Snake district. At the Baptist Mission in this district Ellis completed his education. On June 14, 1874, he married Martha Murrell, daughter of a Texas gentleman of that name. By this marriage he has three children, Spencer Lee, twelve years old; William H. and Lulu, aged eight years. Mr. Alberty’s first important office was that of senator to represent the Going Snake district, to which office he was elected August 3, 1891, his opponents being J. M. Starr and Johnson Spaight. He is a strong supporter of the Downing party, and as he says himself, will hang with them until the end. He has 150 acres in cultivation, which he farms himself, his land being of the richest and most durable quality. His boys are attending Prairie Grove School, and will be provided with a good, sound education. Mr. Alberty is a quiet, dignified gentlemen of unimpeachable...

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Biography of William C. Patton

The subject of this sketch was born August 1, 1829, being seventh son and fourteenth child of Joseph E. Patton, of Buncombe County, North Carolina, a farmer and stock-raiser. His mother was a Miss Orr, of South Carolina. William went to a neighborhood school until fifteen years of age, and at eighteen went to Lafayette Academy, Walker County, Georgia, where he remained two years. In 1853 he went into the mercantile business in Georgia, and continued in it until 1860. In that year he opened out in Chattanooga, and in 1862 joined the Confederate army, continuing in service until the close. After the war Mr. Patton farmed in Walker County, Georgia, for two years, after which he re-entered the mercantile business at Lafayette. In the fall of 1868 he re-opened at Ringold, Ga., continued in business until 1874, then moved to Springfield, Missouri, where he followed the mercantile business until 1879, when he moved to Vinita, Indian Territory, and there embarked in stock-raising and agriculture. Soon afterwards Mr. Patton opened a large mercantile establishment in the same place, which he is now conducting. In May 1862, he married Miss Jane Davis, daughter of Martin Davis, a Georgian planter. Mrs. Patton’s mother was the daughter of the well-known Colonel Sam Tate, of Cherokee County, Georgia. Mrs. Patton is one-fourth Cherokee. They have three children, Pauline (now Mrs. Ed. Halsell), Julia...

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Biographical Sketch of Leroy L. Crutchfield

Leroy L. Crutchfield was born in Collin County, Texas, October 25, 1844, second son of John Crutchfield, from Alabama, who married Miss Mary E. Ladd, of Tennessee. Leroy attended private schools till 1861, when he entered the Confederate service joining the Fifteenth Texas Calvary, under Col. G. H. Sweet, and was in continual service till the close of the war. IN 1870 he went into the cattle business with his father, and was then elected sheriff of “Jack” County, in which capacity he served five years. Afterward he engaged in merchandise in Jacksborough, and continued it till November 1887, when he moved to Vinita, Indian Territory, purchasing the grocery and furniture business of W. C. Patton & Co. Mr. Crutchfield conducted this business till 1889, and then, by appointment of Chief Mayes, entered the service of the revenue department of the Cherokee Nation, as collector for Coosescoowee district, and in June 20, 1891, his duties were enlarged by having the Cherokee strip added to his territory. Mr. Crutchfield was married to Miss Lizzie Horton, daughter of Major H. Horton, of Lee County, Virginia, on August 12, 1868, at Decatur, Texas. By this marriage they have three living children, viz: Anna, Josie and John, ranging in age from ten to twenty-two. Mrs. Crutchfield is a lady of accomplishments and good education, thoroughly practical, and whose chief care is to look...

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Biographical Sketch of David Albert Mounts

The subject of this sketch was born June 1854, the eldest son of W. J. Mounts, of Wheeling, W. Va. He was educated in Kentucky, Missouri, Texas and Indiana, having been with his father in these states. After coming to Fort Gibson he went to work for O. W. Lipe, in 1877, for half interest in the profits of his business. He remained two years, and in 1879 married Miss Carrie Thompson, one of the belles of the Cherokee Nation and highly accomplished. In 1881 he went to work for Mr. Scott as head clerk in his mercantile establishment, and there remained until 1888, when he associated himself with Mr. W. S. Nash, the title of the firm being W. S. Nash & Co., which business he still continues. Mr. Mounts has four children, John, Claud, Ray and Howard. In height he measures five feet ten inches and weighs 140 pounds, is of gentlemanly appearance and kind and affable in disposition. Mr. Mounts is deservedly popular with the people of Fort Gibson and its...

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Biography of De Witt Clinton Lipe

The subject of this sketch was born February 17, 1840, in Tahlequah district, Cherokee Nation, eldest son of O. W. Lipe, of Fort Gibson, and Catherine Gunter. De Witt attended public school until twelve years of age, when he went to Cane Hill, Arkansas, and there remained two sessions, after which he entered the Male Seminary at Tahlequah, leaving there at fifteen years of age. Although but a boy De Witt commenced clerking in a general mercantile establishment, and continued the business until he was eighteen years of age, when he started in cattle on his own responsibility with a stock of 150 head, and continued until after the war, when he established a mercantile house in Coowescoowee district, carrying on the business until 1870. In that year he moved to his present home, seven miles north of Claremore, still merchandizing and stock-raising, until 1884, when he sold his store and its effects, and is now devoting his attention to stock and agriculture. Mr. Lipe has been district clerk and senator, the latter for two years. In 1879 he was elected treasurer of the nation, and held that position for four years. In 1885 he was again elected to the Senate, and in 1887 was commissioner of citizenship. Mr. Lipe married Miss V. Hicks, daughter of Elijah Hicks, in September 1861. She was niece of Chief John Ross. By...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Eliza C. Hefflefinger

(See Rogers) -Eliza, daughter of Jesse and Elizabeth Cochran was born in the Cherokee Nation in 1853. At the time that she would be in school the Civil War with all of its malevolence broke over the Cherokee Nation and it is only due to her native ability that she is now widely known for her general intelligence and information. She married in 1872 Greenville Pace Hefflefinger. He was one of the most progressive farmers of his community and always kept thoroughly abreast with the period. They were the parents of Joseph and Fannie Hefflefinger. Mrs. Hefflefinger is a member of the Presbyterian...

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Biographical Sketch of William. N. Clark

(See Scraper, Ward and Grant)-William N., son of Judge George Washington and Lydia A. (Scraper) Clark, was born April 3, 1866, educated in the public schools of the Cherokee Nation, and graduated from Male Seminary June 25, 1885. He married September 26, 1894, Lilla John, daughter of De Hardiman and Anna (Wilson) Flournoy, born April 15, 1874. W. H. Clark’s Cherokee name is Oo-law-hut. He is a Methodist and a Mason. W. H. and Lillar J. Flournoy are the parents of: James Wilson, born February 28, 1896; Mabel Clyde, born December 18, 1898; Raleigh Phillips, born January 5, 1900; Rosa Blanche, born January 5, 1902; William Henry, born May 4, 1904; E. W.., born August 15, 1906; C. F., born February 22, 1908; L. B. Clark, born September 9, 1913, and Clifford Clark, born March 12,...

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