Location: Hunt County TX

Choctaw Traditions – The Council Fire, The Nahullo

The faces of the Choctaw and Chickasaw men of sixty years ago were as smooth as a woman’s, in fact they had no beard. Sometimes there might be seen a few tine hairs (if hairs they might be called) here and there upon the face, but they were few and far between, and extracted with a pair of small tweezers whenever discovered. Oft have I seen a Choctaw warrior standing before a mirror seeking with untiring perseverance and unwearied eyes, as he turned his face at different angles to the glass, if by chance a hair could be found lurking there, which, if discovered, was instantly removed as an unwelcome intruder. Even today, a full blood Choctaw or Chickasaw with a heavy beard is never seen. I have seen a few, here and there, with a little patch of beard upon their chins, but it was thin and short, and with good reasons to suspect that white blood flowed in their veins. It is a truth but little known among the whites, that the North American Indians of untarnished blood have no hair upon any part of the body except the head. My knowledge of this peculiarity was confined, however, to the Choctaws and Chickasaws alone. But in conversation with an aged Choctaw friend upon this subject, and inquiring” if this peculiarity extended to all Indians, he replied; “To all,...

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Mission’s Among the Southern Indians

In the year 1819 the Synod of South Carolina resolved to establish a mission among the Southern Indians east of the Mississippi river. The Cherokees, Muskogee’s, Seminoles, Choctaws and Chickasaws then occupied Georgia, Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Rev. David Humphries offered to take charge of the intended mission. He was directed to visit the Indians, obtain their consent and select a suitable location. Rev. T. C. Stewart, then a young licentiate, offered himself as a companion to Mr. Humphries. They first visited the Muskogee’s (Creeks), who, in a council of the Nation, declined their proposition. They then traveled through...

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Slave Narrative of Bert Luster

Person Interviewed: Bert Luster Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Watson County, Tennessee Date of Birth: 1853 Age: 85 I’ll be jest frank, I’m not for sho’ when I was born, but it was in 1853. Don’t know the month, but I was sho’ born in 1853 in Watson County, Tennessee. You see my father was owned by Master Luster and my mother was owned by Masters Joe and Bill Asterns (father and son). I can remember when Master Astern moved from Watson County, Tennessee he brought me and my mother with him to Barnum County Seat, Texas. Master Astern owned about twelve slaves, and dey was all Astern ‘cept Miriah Blmore’s son Jim. He owned ’bout five or six hundred acres of ground, and de slaves raised and shucked all de corn and picked all de cotton. De whites folks lived in a big double log house and we slaves lived in log cabins. Our white folks fed us darkies! We ate nearly ever’thing dey ate. Dey ate turkey, chickens, ducks, geese, fish and we killed beef. pork, rabbits and deer. Yes, and possums too. And whenever we killed beef we tanned the hide and dare was a white man who made shoes for de white folks and us darkies. I tell you I’m not gonna lie, den white folks was good to us darkies. We didn’t...

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Slave Narrative of Francis Bridges

Person Interviewed: Francis Bridges Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Red River County, Texas Date of Birth: 1864 Age: 73 Occupatio I was born in Red River County, Texas in 1864, and that makes me 73 years old. I had myself 75, and I went to my white folks and they counted it un and told me I was 73, but I always felt like I was older than that. My husband’s name is Henry Bridges. We was raised up children together and married. I had five sisters. My brother died here in Oklahoma about two years ago. He was a Fisher. Mary Russell, my sister, she lives in Parish, Texas; Willie Ann Poke, she lives in Greenville, Texas; Winnie Jackson, lives in Adonia, Texas, and Mattie White, my other sister, lives in Long Oak, Texas, White Hunt County. Our Master was named Master Travis Wright, and we all ate nearly the same thing. Such things as barbecued rabbits, coon, possums baked with sweet potatoes and all such as that. I used to hang round the kitchen. The cook, Mama Winnie Long, used to feed all us little niggers on the flo’, jest like little pigs, in tin cups and wooden spoons. We ate fish too, and I like to go fishing right this very day. We lived right in old Master Wright’s yard. His house sat way...

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Biographical Sketch of Miller Green

Miller Green, who lives at Black Jack Grove, is a native Texan. He was born in Red River district in the year 1837. Two years after his birth his father moved into the vicinity of where Greenville in Hunt County is situated. In the year 1854 he moved to where he is now living. In the year 1867 Miller married Ophelia Cole, daughter of Wash Cole, an old pioneer and one of the first who came to Hopkins County. He was highly respected and esteemed by all of his acquaintances. His name is agreeably remembered as that of one of the leading personages of the county. Ophelia was born at Old Sulphur Bluff in the year 1845, She is dead now, and so is her father. Miller Green has seven children living. He was a Texas Ranger, and served his state as an Indian fighter for two years. He was a soldier in the Confederate army and saw hard service for four years. He served under General Ross in the Ninth Texas Cavalry, receiving a slight wound while in the discharge of his duty. When he returned from the war he engaged in farming and stock raising, and was reasonably successful. He has always been in easy circumstances, meeting his obligations promptly. He has been a taxpayer in the county since and before his majority. He has encouraged the...

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Biography of Warner E. Williams

Warner E. Williams. While now one of the great trunk railway systems of the country, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad was largely developed as a Kansas corporation. The main offices of the company at Kansas are at Parsons, where 2,200 of its employes reside. The different lines of the road converge and diverge from that point in six directions: To Hannibal and St. Louis, Missouri; to Kansas City, Missouri; to Junction City, Kansas; to Joplin, Missouri, to Denison, Texas; and to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. For several years the general manager of the system with headquarters at Parsons was Warner E. Williams, who had recently been transferred to Dallas, Texas, where he began his career as a railroad man and where he is now general manager of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway of Texas. Mr. Williams was born at Houston, Texas, May 29, 1864, attended the public schools at Houston, and as a boy worked as a messenger in a law office. He was similarly employed in a wholesale grocery house at Houston, but in 1881 at the age of seventeen he became check clerk at the freight house of the International and Great Northern Railroad at Taylor, Texas. During his thirty-five years of experience he had been steadily promoted in the scale of responsibility. At Palestine, Texas, he was roadmaster’s clerk, filled other places in the transportation...

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Thompson, Everett – Obituary

E. C. Thompson passed away in this city last Sunday morning at 12:50 o’clock from heart trouble caused by after effects of the flu. The young man was a railroad telegrapher and had worked a trunk (?) at the North Powder station in times passed, but held a like position at Baker at the time of his death. Everett C. Thompson was born Aug. 10, 1904, in Commerce, Texas. He came to Union county, Oregon, Dec. 22, 1928. He was united in marriage to Miss Ethel Fay Jones of North Powder Oct. 5, 1929. Funeral services were held at 2:30 p.m. April 9, at West undertaking parlor, Baker and the body was sent to Commerce, Texas, accompanied by L.V. Vermillion, chairman of the O.R.T., of which the deceased was a member. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Ethel Fay Thompson of North Powder; his mother, Mrs. J.A. Thompson, Commerce, Texas; two sisters, Mrs. Robert Horn, Greenville, Texas, Miss Evon Thompson, Commerce, Texas; four brothers, Verdell of Commerce, W.L. of Jacksonville, Aldo of Mexico City, New Mexico, and Felton of Pierre, South Dakota. We wish to express our sincere thanks and appreciations to our many friends for their kindness and beatuiful floral offerings during the recent loss of our beloved husband and son. Mrs. E.C. Thompson; Mr. and Mrs. Alma Jones and family North Powder News – Oregon Trail...

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Emmons, Charlie – Obituary

Charlie Emmons, 98, a former Baker City resident, died Aug. 25, 2005, at the McAllen Medical Center in McAllen, Texas. His family was planning a special memory 99th birthday party for Charlie on Sept. 9, and he was really looking forward to it. The family will play a video of his life at his memorial service and hope he will be pleased. Charlie was born on Sept. 9, 1906, at Greenville, Texas. He married Erma McCormick in 1926, and they were married for 70 years. When they married she was 16 and he was 19. Erma was the love of Charlie’s life. Charlie worked at Dentlers Potato Chip Co. for 42 years. He also worked in the insurance business. At the age of 70 he learned a new profession and became a machinist. Charlie could build or fix anything. After Charlie retired, he and Erma intended to travel, but after three years Erma lost her vision. Even with her blindness, Erma continued with her quilting passion. Charlie was her faithful companion and he threaded all her needles and helped her in every way. Charlie spent the next 25 years taking care of Erma and spending time with their family. Charlie and Erma had a travel trailer and they saw most of the United States, including Alaska and Hawaii. Fifteen family members flew to Hawaii to honor “Nanny and Papaw,”...

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Webb Hill Cemetery, Hunt County, Texas

A cemetery transcription of Webb Hill Cemetery in Hunt County, Texas. This cemetery is located about 5 miles south of Wolfe City off Highway 34. HARRELL Emma, d. 6 Oct. 1908, ae. 45. Wife of W. M. Fannie L., b. 2 May 1875, d. 26 May 1961. Irene, b. 24 Aug. 1885, d. 17 July 1957. Sarah L., b. 16 Oct. 1854, d. 6 Jan. 1897. Wife of WJB. Born in Coffee Co., TN. W. J., b. 2 Aug. 1853, d. 29 Dec. 1946. Born in Cannon Co., TN. JONES Mary Ann, b. 28 Mar. 1828, d. 3 Jan. 1897. Wife of James. Born in Coffee Co., TN. MORRIS Ruth Harrell, b. 20 Mar. 1885, d. 9 Sept....

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Lowell Cemetery, Hunt County, Texas

A cemetery transcription of Lowell Cemetery in Hunt County, Texas. This abandoned cemetery was destroyed by cattle on private property about three miles north of Celeste. Copied circa 1957. LOWELL James Henry, b. Jan 1851, d. Nov. 1894. Four other graves unmarked, one of which appears to be an...

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Quinlan Cemetery, Hunt County, Texas

A cemetery transcription of Quinlan Cemetery in Hunt County, Texas. The exact location of this cemetery was not noted but it is assumed that it is near or in Quinlan, Texas, in southwest Hunt county. It was copied circa 1963 – 64. STRACENER J. M., 1865 – 1909. Sarah L., Mrs., 1868 – 1944. BOWLING J. A., b. 9 Feb. 1849, d. 25 Dec. 1915. SEALE Finus Lee, b. 13 July 1848, d. 20 Aug. 1899. Son of T. M. & F. W. BOWSWELL Hardie, b. & d. 1891. Infant son of S. R. & L. M. Ada A., b. & d. 1885. Infant dau. of S. R. & L. M. L. E., 1883 – 1884. Son of S. R. & L. M. Roger M., 1892 – 1908. Son of S. R. & L. M. BLOUNT Jepthia William, 1868 – 1901. Laura Estelle, 1874 – 1963. DEWEESE A., b. 25 Mar. 1847, d. 29 Nov. 1896. Rebecca A., 1851 – 1925. SEALS Celia, b. 12 Jan. 1869, d. 22 Mar. 1888. BIBBY Hettie E., b. 1894. Ohelon, 1890 – 1940. TOMERLIN Jesse M., 1898 – 1950. Edna, 1898 – 1959. BUTLER Frances Louise, 1875 – 1955. Thomas Jasper?, 1870 – 1950. Married 27 Oct. 1899. PETTY Elihu, 1890 – 1946. BUIE J. Kyle, 1895 – 1939. Gilbert, 1859 – 1935. Lula Ann, b. 1870. BLOMFIELD S. M., 1861 –...

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