Select Page

Location: Hulbert Oklahoma

Biographical Sketch of George W. Griffin

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Conrad and Hendricks)-George W., son of Isaiah and Katie (Rich) Griffin was born in Rutherford County, Tennessee March 4, 1861; Married at Tahlequah Aug. 8, 1899 Jenetta, daughter of James R. and Elizabeth (Hendricks) Gourd, born Jan. 24, 1868. They are the parents of Alice, born Oct. 15, 1901; Ira, born Oct. 3, 1908, and Blanche Griffin born Oct. 25, 1911. Mr. Griffin is a farmer near Hulbert,...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Henry C. Pennell

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Grant and Duncan)-Dora Fannie, daughter of Thomas Fox and Helen Alice (Kell) French, born July 17, 1874. Educated at Fort Gibson and Female Seminary. Married December 6, 1893 Henry Camillius son of William and Caroline Pennel, born January 18, 1873 in Washington County, Ark. They are the parents of: Thomas William born October 5, 1895; Charles Columbus, born December 9, 1897; James Kell, born January 19, 1900; Bernice, born Feb. 27, 1904 and Thelda Pennel, born March 3, 1915. Mr. and Mrs. Pennel are member of the Holiness Church. They are farmers, near Hulbert,...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Judge A. E. Robertson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Ghigau, Foreman, Riley and Conrad).—Arthur Evans son of Evans Price and Sarah Ellen (Spears) Robertson was born at Hulbert, Cherokee Nation, Tuesday, September 18, 1888. He was educated in the Cherokee National Schools, Henry Kendall College of Muskogee, graduating from the preparatory department; St. Charles Military College, St. Charles, Missouri; University of Tulsa, from which he graduated; University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma and University of Paris, Paris, France. He served in the A. E. F. in France with the 143rd Infantry, 36th Division. His Cherokee name is Wah-la-seee and he belongs to the Bird Clan. He is a member of the Presbyterian church and the Knights of Pythias fraternity. Reverend Evans Price, son of Wade Hampton, and Diana (Hair) Robertson was born at Tahlequah, October 10, 1855. Married at Tahlequah, June 24, 1883 Sarah Ellen, daughter of Eli and Elizabeth (Hall) Spears, born at Catchertown, Tahlequah District, April 3, 1855. Wade Hampton Robertson a native of McMinn County, Tennessee. A member of Company E Second Indian Home Guards. He was killed in a skirmish at Tahlequah on March 28, 1863, originally buried in the Cherokee Capitol square but later removed to the city cemetery. Arthur Evans Robertson was elected County Judge of Cherokee County, November 2,...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Victoria Taylor Thompson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Victoria Taylor Thompson Age: 80 My mother, Judy Taylor, named for her mistress, told me that I was born about three year before the war; that make me about 80 year old so they say down at the Indian Agency where my name is on the Cherokee rolls since all the land was give to the Indian families a long time ago. Father kept the name of ‘Doc’ Hayes, and my brother Coose was a Hayes too, but mother, Jude, Patsy, Bonaparte (Boney, we always called him), Lewis and me was always Taylors. Daddy was bought by the Taylors (Cherokee Indians); they made a trade for him with some hilly land, but he kept the name of Hayes even then. Like my mother, I was born on the Taylor place. They lived in Flint District, around the Caney settlement on Caney Creek. Lots of the Arkansas Cherokees settled around there long times before the Cherokees come here from the east, my mother said. The farm wasn’t very big, we was the only slaves on the place, and it was just a little ways from a hill everybody called Sugar Mountain, because it was covered with maple sugar trees, and an old Indian lived on the hillside, making maple sugar candy to sell and trade....

Read More

Slave Narrative of Nancy Rogers Bean

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Nancy Rogers Bean Location: Hulbert, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Boggy Depot, Oklahoma Age: 82 I’m getting old and it’s easy to forget most of the happenings of slave days; anyway I was too little to know much about them, for my mammy told me I was born about six years before the war. My folks was on their way to Fort Gibson, and on the trip I was born at Boggy Depot, down in southern Oklahoma. There was a lot of us children; I got their names somewheres here. Yes, there was George, Sarah, Emma, Stella, Sylvia, Lucinda, Rose, Den, Pamp, Jeff, Austin, Jessie, Isaac and Andrew: we all lived in a one room log cabin on Master Rogers’ place not far from the old military road near Choteau. Mammy was raised around the Cherokee town of Tahlequah. I got my name from the Rogers, but I was loaned around to their relatives most of the time. I helped around the house for Bill McCracken, then I was with Cornelius and Carline Wright, and when I was freed my Mistress was a Mrs. O’Neal, wife of a officer at Fort Gibson. She treated me the best of all and gave me the first doll I ever had. It was a rag doll with charcoal...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Phyllis Petite

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Phyllis Petite Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Rusk County, Texas Age: 83 I was born in Rusk County, Texas, on a plantation about eight miles east of Belleview. There wasn’t no town where I was born, but they had a church. My mammy and pappy belonged to a part Cherokee named W. P. Thompson when I was born. He had kinfolks in the Cherokee Nation, and we all moved up here to a place on Fourteen-Mile Creek close to where Hulbert now is. ‘way before I was big enough to remember anything. Then, so I been told, old master Thompson sell my pappy and mammy and one of my baby brothers and me back to one of his neighbors in Texas name of John Harnage. Mammy’s name was Letitia Thompson and pappy’s was Riley Thompson. My little brother was named Johnson Thompson, but I had another brother sold to a Vann and he always call hisself Harry Vann. His Cherokee master lived on the Arkansas river close to Webber’s Falls and I never did know him until we was both grown. My only sister was Patsy and she was borned after slavery and died at Wagoner, Oklahoma. I can just remember when Master John Harnage took us to Texas. We went in...

Read More

Biography of Robert F. King

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The town of Hulbert, Oklahoma, is a monument to the business ability and enterprise of such men as Robert F. King, who came to this community when its proportions were those of a village. He recognized, however, the possibilities for growth and development here and became a prominent factor in business circles and active in the management of affairs which have constituted important elements in public progress. When he came here the Frisco railroad was just being built through this section of the country. He erected a store and residence one-half mile east of the present location of the town and also a cotton gin on the railroad. He later purchased a section of land, now included in the town, and plotted sixty acres, dividing them into lots which he sold. Mr. King’s home is one of the conspicuous places in this locality and is modern in every way, having its own electric light, heat and sewer systems. Robert F. King is not a native of Oklahoma, for he was born near Yellville, Arkansas, on the 4th of May, 1863, a son of Robert F. and Phoebia (Orr). The father was a native of Tennessee, while Mrs. King was born in Kentucky, and they both removed to Arkansas with their parents at an early age. They...

Read More

Search


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest