Location: Hudson New York

Descendants of Thomas Tobey of Sandwich, MA

The earliest record of a Toby or Tobey in our American annals is that of one Francis of Boston, who was in court on July 7, 1635.

The first known and credited ancestor of this family was Thomas Tobey, of Scituate, Mass. He removed to Sandwich, Mass., and was a member of church there in 1694. He married at Sandwich Nov. 18, 1650, Martha Knott, daughter of George Knott, deceased

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Biography of Henry Chase Bradbury

Henry Chase Bradbury. It is truly a fortunate man who can come to his seventy-third year with a record of so much good accomplished, with many responsibilities discharged and burdens bravely sustained as have been part and parcel of the life and experience of Henry Chase Bradbury, now living at Lincoln. Rev. Mr. Bradbury is the oldest active missionary of the Presbyterian Church in Kansas. For all the more than forty years of work he had done in Kansas Mr. Bradbury enjoys a vigorous old age and only his more intimate friends know that he had passed the three score and ten mile post. His early environment and inheritance probably predisposed him for the career and vocation he had followed. The Bradbury ancestors came from England to Maine in colonial times, his remote ancestor having acted as an agent of Ferdinand Gorges, 1620, who had extensive colonization rights from the Crown and made the first settlement along the coast of Maine. His father was Elbridge Bradbury, a prominent scholar, educator and minister and spent his last years in Kansas. Elbridge Bradbury was born at Medford, Massachusetts, August 2, 1805. He was a graduate of the Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire and in 1831 graduted from Amherst College. He taught in a classical school at New Lebanon, New York, and afterwards had charge of a classical and English school...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles Henry Bump

Charles Henry Bump, third child, was born in Hudson, New York, September 8, 1848, and died in April, 1921. He received a thorough education at Spencertown Academy and at Hudson Private Institute. In 1874 he married Emma Weeks, born in 1854, died in May, 1904; daughter of Robert Weeks, and they became the parents of four children: 1. Mary, born in 1875, died in 1877. 2. James A., III, born in 1878. 3. Charles Henry, of further mention. 4. Lawrence Woodward, born in 1884 and cashier in the National Bank at Great Barrington, Massachusetts; he married, in 1909 Edith Davis, and they have a daughter, Helen, born in...

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Biographical Sketch of James Allen Bump, Jr.

James Allen Bump, Jr., their son, was born in 1817 and died in 1880. He was the first agent for the New York Central Railroad Company at Hudson, New York; he furnished wood for the company and was the first conductor on the Hudson & Berkshire Railroad. He married, in 1842, Mary Augusta Shattuck, and they were the parents of five children: 1. Mary Elizabeth, born in 1843; died in 1853. 2. Sarah, born 1845, died 1920. 3. Charles Henry, of further mention. 4. Caroline, born 1850, died 1897. 5 and 6. twins, Arthur and Allen, born in...

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Biography of Charles H. Bump

President and secretary of W. J. Foss & Company of Springfield; treasurer of Foss & Bump, Incorporated; and president of the Mortgage and Investment Company, was born in Hudson, Columbia County, New York, June 11, 1881. His father was Charles Henry Bump, Sr., his mother Mary Augusta (Shattuck) Bump. The name is derived from Boneloz of Normandy, a fief held from the Earl of Melleut, and the family Bompas, as the name came to be known in England. It has for centuries been conspicuously and widely in the legal annals of the country, and honorably mentioned in public affairs. It has passed through a series of transitions. During the latter centuries of the Norman conquest it was Bompas; and had changed to Bompasse at the time the first representative of the family came to America in 1621. At a later date it was Bumpus, and finally in the land of brevity Bomps and Bump. Edward Bompasse came to America in 1621 in the ship “Fortune” landing at Plymouth, Massachusetts, November 9 or 11. He became the father of seven or eight children, among them four sons, John, Edward, Joseph, and Jacob, born in 1636, 1638, 1639, and 1644 respectively. The sons in turn were the progenitors of large families. John had five sons: John, Samuel, James, Edward, and Jeremiah, born between the years 1673 and 1692, and duly recorded....

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Biography of Amasa J. Parker

AMASA J. PARKER AN ALBANIAN of high intellectual qualities, who has passed his four-score years, and who has been a resident of this city for forty-four years, adorning its history by distinguished public service and private virtues is the Hon. Amasa J. Parker. He is a true representative of those enterprising New England pioneers who came from their old homes to aid in the development of the then new state of New York and the great western territories. Away back amidst the howling wilderness, where the cheering rays of the sun scarcely ever beamed upon their humble log cabins, they lived and toiled for the good of their country, their families, and their cherished civil and religious institutions. Judge Parker’s ancestors were among those who defended their homes from the invasion of the red men during the old French and English wars, when many a deed of horrid cruelty was enacted by the savages – when the tomahawk and scalping-knife in the hands of murderous foes gleamed through the thick forests, and when fears prevailed on every side, through the light of day and the darkness of night. And when the declaration of American independence was proclaimed, those worthy ancestors were found fighting on the side of the colonists in defense of the just rights of free men; and they laid not down their arms until this new republic...

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Biography of Eugene Burlingame

EUGENE BURLINGAME IN THE long list of noted Albanians who have reflected honor upon their native or adopted city, the name of Eugene Burlingame stands in a conspicuous place. He has thus far exhibited a true manhood, an enterprising, industrious and persevering spirit in his private and professional career. He comes from a substantial family of New England, the distinguished Anson Burlingame being a relative of his. He was born on the 24th of January, 1847, in the town of Willet, Cortland County, N. Y. His grandfather, a pioneer from New England, was one of the earliest settlers of that county, and possessed the same adventurous, daring spirit that has characterized the most prominent men of the eastern states. He found his way to his new settlement through a vast and howling wilderness, crossing the Catskill Mountains on horseback in olden times, and finally taking up his residence amid the primeval forests of Cortland county. Here he went to work with strong hands and a brave heart to clear up the wilderness around him. He was a man of more than ordinary physical and mental powers, attaining the great age of ninety-three, when he died honored and respected by all who knew him. Eugene Burlingame is a son of Westcott Burlingame and Melinda Eaton, both of whom are still living. His earliest years were passed on his father’s farm,...

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From Catskill to Hudson along the Hudson River

Leaving Catskill dock, the Prospect Park Hotel looks down upon us from a commanding point on the west bank, while north of this can be seen Cole’s Grove, where Thomas Cole, the artist, lived, who painted the well-known series, the Voyage of Life. On the east side is Rodger’s Island, where it is said the last battle was fought between the Mahican and Mohawk; and it is narrated that “as the old king of the Mahican was dying, after the conflict, he commanded his regalia to be taken off and his successor put into the kingship while his eyes were yet clear to behold him. Over forty years had he worn it, from the time he received it in London from Queen Anne. He asked him to kneel at his couch, and, putting his withered hand across his brow, placed the feathery crown upon his head, and gave him the silver-mounted tomahawk¬ósymbols of power to rule and power to execute. Then, looking up to the heavens, he said, as if in despair for his race, ‘The hills are our pillows, and the broad plains to the west our hunting-grounds; our brothers are called into the bright wigwam of the Everlasting, and our bones lie upon the fields of many battles; but the wisdom of the dead is given to the living.'” On the east bank of the Hudson, above...

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