Location: Hot Springs Arkansas

Bowman, Wallace R., Sr. – Obituary

Wallace R. Bowman, Sr., 73 years old, 27198 Oak Drive, died Aug. 20, 1988, at the Veterans Administration Hospital, Fort Wayne, Ind. He was born July 19, 1915, in Elkhart County, Ind., a son of Frank A. and Carrie (Lampe) Bowman. On Feb. 4, 1943, he married Marion Schrader in Hot Springs, Ark. She died March 12, 1978. On April 6, 1983, he married Nancy Hunt in Sturgis. He was a Sturgis resident most of his life and was employed at the Kirsch Company. For 42 years, he had operated the B & W Tavern, retiring in 1983. He was a member of the Jack Johnston Chapter 88 disabled American Veterans, American Legion Post 303, Bonita Springs, Fla., Loyal Order of the Moose 574, American Association of Retired Persons and the Michigan United Conservation Clubs. He was a life member of the Fraternal Order of the Eagles Aerie 1314 and the Sturgis Elks Lodge 1381. Surviving are his wife; one son, Wallace R. Bowman Jr., Sturgis; five grandchildren; nine great grandchildren; and one sister, Geraldine Wolfe, Bronson. He was preceded in death by his parents. Relative and friends may call after 2 p.m. today at the Rosenberg-Schipper Funeral Home, Sturgis, where the family will receive friends from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. today. Services are at 1 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral home with the Rev. Ray Burgess, First...

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Biography of William Gregg Andrews

William Gregg Andrews, a prosperous farmer of Sutton, Merrimack County, N.H., was born July 7, 1834, on the farm upon which he now lives. His father was Nathan Andrews, Jr., a native of Sutton; and his paternal grandfather was Nathan Andrews, Sr., born in Danvers, Mass., in 1767, a son of Samuel Andrews. He came to Merrimack County when a young man, and in 1795 he married Hannah Gregg and at once settled upon a farm at Fishersfield. His wife was a daughter of James and Janet (Collins) Gregg, and, though lame from childhood, was energetic and industrious, and lived to the age of ninety-four, a very bright and interesting old lady. In 1811 Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Andrews, Sr., built a frame house in Sutton, which with other buildings was burned in 1834. They then built a brick house, which was destroyed by fire on August 28, 1890. Mr. Andrews passed to the higher life September 7, 1853. Mrs. Andrews died April 7, 1866. Their son, Nathan, Jr., was born in Sutton, March 30, 1802, and died March 16, 1883. He married Dolly Sargent Pillsbury, who was born February 16, 1801, and died June 29, 1883. In early years they attended the Congregational church at Bradford Centre, but were later identified with the Baptist church at Bradford Mills Village. Uncle Nathan, as he was called, was a very...

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Slave Narrative of R. B. Anderson

Interviewer: Samuel S. Taylor Person Interviewed: R. B. Anderson Location: Route 4, Box 69 (near Granite), Little Rock, Arkansas Age: 76 Occupation: Grocer, bartender, porter, general work [HW: The Brooks-Baxter War] “I was born in Little Rock along about Seventeenth and Arch Streets. There was a big plantation there then. Dr. Wright owned the plantation. He owned my mother and father. My father and mother told me that I was born in 1862. They didn’t know the date exactly, so I put it the last day in the year and call it December 30, 1862. “My father’s name was William Anderson. He didn’t go to the War because he was blind. He was ignorant too. He was colored. He was a pretty good old man when he died. “My mother’s name was Minerva Anderson. She was three-fourths Indian, hair way down to her waist. I was in Hot Springs blacking boots when my mother died. I was only about eight or ten years old then. I always regretted I wasn’t able to do anything for my mother before she died. I don’t know to what tribe her people belonged. “Dr. Wright was awful good to his slaves. “I don’t know just how freedom came to my folks. I never heard my father say. They were set free, I know. They were set free when the War ended. They never...

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Slave Narrative of James Baker

Interviewer: Mary D. Hudgins Person Interviewed: James Baker Location: With daughter who own home at 941 Wade St., Hot Springs, Arkansas Age: 81 The outskirts of eastern Hot Springs resemble a vast checkerboard—patterned in Black and White. Within two blocks of a house made of log-faced siding—painted a spotless white and provided with blue shutters will be a shack which appears to have been made from the discard of a dozen generations of houses. Some of the yards are thick with rusting cans, old tires and miscelaneous rubbish. Some of them are so gutted by gully wash that any attempt at beautification would be worse than useless. Some are swept—farm fashion—free from surface dust and twigs. Some attempt—others achieve grass and flowers. Vegetable gardens are far less frequent then they should be, considering space left bare. The interviewer frankly lost her way several times. One improper direction took her fully half a mile beyond her destination. From a hilltop she could look down on less elevated hills and into narrow valleys. The impression was that of a cheaply painted back-drop designed for a “stock” presentation of “Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch.” Moving along streets, alleys and paths backward “toward town” the interviewer reached another hill. Almost a quarter of a mile away she spied an old colored man sunning himself on the front porch of a well kept...

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Slave Narrative of Lizzie Barnett

Interviewer: Mrs. Rosa B. Ingram Person Interviewed: Lizzie Barnett Location: Conway, Arkansas Age: 100? “Yes; I was born a slave. My old mammy was a slave before me. She was owned by my old Miss, Fanny Pennington, of Nashville, Tennessee. I was born on a plantation near there. She is dead now. I shore did love Miss Fanny. “Did you have any brothers and sisters, Aunt Liz.?” “Why, law yes, honey, my mammy and Miss Fanny raised dey chillun together. Three each, and we was jes’ like brothers and sisters, all played in de same yard. No, we did not eat together. Dey sot us niggers out in de yard to eat, but many a night I’se slept with Miss Fanny. “Mr. Pennington up and took de old-time consumption. Dey calls it T.B. now. My mammy nursed him and took it from him and died before Mr. Abe Lincoln ever sot her free. “I have seen hard times, Miss, I shore have. “In dem days when a man owned a plantation and had children and they liked any of the little slave niggers, they were issued out to ’em just like a horse or cow. “‘Member, honey, when de old-time war happened between the North and South, The Slavery War. It was so long ago I just can ‘member it. Dey had us niggers scared to death of the Bluejackets. One day...

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Biography of E. O. Smith, M. D.

E. O. Smith, M. D. A physician and surgeon in Kansas for twenty years, Dr. E. O. Smith had attained high rank as a surgeon and is now the active associate of his brother, F. R. Smith, in the practice of surgery at the Winfield Hospital, which the brothers own. A resident of Kansas since 1874, Dr. E. O. Smith was born on a farm three miles from Peru, Madison County, Iowa, January 19, 1869, a son of William and Ellen (Hollingshead) Smith. His father was a native of Kentucky, but in early life went to Illinois with his parents, and was a soldier in the Civil war, fighting with Sherman’s gallant armies through the heart of the Confederacy and over the route of the march to the sea. William Smith afterwards went to Iowa, and from there brought his family to Kansas in 1874. He located in Rice County, developed one of the pioneer farms, and in time enjoyed the prosperity which Kansas soil and climate finally gave to those who most persistently cultivated its broad acres. He finally lived retired at Little River, Kansas, until his death in 1906. His wife, Ellen Hollingshead, was his second wife, and they were the parents of six children, Dr. E. O. Smith being the youngest. Other facts concerning the family history will be found in the sketch of Dr. F....

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