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Location: Holland

The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his maps and geographical charts, and...

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Biographical Sketch of William G. Powell

William G. Powell, of Holland, settled in Albemarle County, Virginia. His son, Lewis G., had three sons, James, Buck, and Lewis, Jr. James married Nancy Shelor, of Germany, and settled in Montgomery County, Missouri, in 1820. They had John W., James W., William L., Thomas J., and two daughters, who died in infancy. After the death of James Powell, his widow, who lived for many years afterward, proved herself to be a woman capable of managing the business affairs of life and carrying them to a successful issue. During the cold winter of 1831-2 she had what is called a “jumping sleigh” built, and went in it to Virginia, one thousand miles distant, by herself, and brought back some Negro slaves in another “jumper” similar to her own. Very few women have ever accomplished such a feat as that. Buck Powell was a very stout man, and it is said that he could lift a barrel of whisky by his teeth and drink from the bung hole. He won a bet of fifty cents one day, by biting a ten penny nail in two, and he certainly earned his money. Thomas J., son of James Powell, is a prominent attorney and citizen of Montgomery County, and lives at New Florence. He has been Sheriff of the County several times, and wields a large influence in political...

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Biography of Peter VanBibber

Peter and Isaac VanBibber, of Holland, came to America and settled in Botetourt Co., Va., previous to the revolution. Peter married Marguety Bounds, and they had Peter, Jr., Jesse, Jacob, James, Joseph, Matthias, Nancy, Sophronia, Ellen, and Olive. James married Jane Irvine, and settled in St. Charles County in 1803. He was Coroner at the time William Hays was killed by his son-in-law, James Davis. In 1817 he removed to Callaway County, and settled on the Auxvasse. His children were Joseph, Irvine, Frances. Lucinda, Melissa, Daniel and Minerva. Joseph was a surveyor and made the government surveys in range eight, west of the fifth principal meridian. Olive VanBibber married Nathan Boone. Isaac VanBibber, Brother of Peter, was Captain of a company in the battle of Point Pleasant, in 1774, and was killed there. He left, a widow and four children John, Peter, Isaac and Rebecca. John and Peter married and settled in Powell’s Valley, East Tennessee. Isaac was born in Greenbriar Co., Va., October 20, 1771, and was only two and a half years old when his father was killed. He was adopted and raised by Colonel Daniel Boone, and at the early age of thirteen years acted as a scout against the Indians in Virginia. In 1800 he came to Missouri with Nathan Boone, and settled first in Darst’s Bottom. During the Indian war he was Major of...

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Biography of Judge William Smieding, Jr.

Judge William Smieding, Jr., who for the past fifteen years has been the municipal and juvenile court judge of Racine County, is a native son of this city and his life record stands in contradistinction to the old adage that a prophet is not without honor save in his own country, for worth and ability have gained him professional recognition and he is regarded as one of the representative members of the Racine bar. He was born September 9, 1868, a son of William and Mary (Wustum) Smieding. The father’s birth occurred at Lübbecke, in western Prussia, November 11, 1831, and he was a son of August and Amelia (Mix) Smieding, who were likewise natives of that country, while his paternal grandfather was a brewer and baker of Germany, where he owned a small shop. He and his wife both died in Germany at an advanced age. Their son August followed in the footsteps of his father, acquainting himself with the trades of brewing and baking, but afterward went to Holland, where he secured a situation as clerk in a store. He was engaged in military duty under Napoleon I in the year 1815. His death occurred in 1850, when he was fifty-six years of age, while his wife passed away about six years before. Their family numbered seven children, including William Smieding, who obtained his education in the...

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Biography of Henry Fullbright

This is one of the most remarkable and worthy families of Boone County, Arkansas, and about the year 1700 the family tree first took root on American soil. The original founder of the family came to America from Holland, made a settlement in Pennsylvania, and was the great-grandfather of the present generation. John Fullbright, his son, is thought to have been born in the Keystone State and in all probability was a soldier of the Revolution. In 1815 he came west to Missouri from the Old North State, the journey thither being made by wagon, the larger portion of the Fullbright family coming at the same time. Here he and his wife died a short time after their arrival. Mrs. Fullbright’s maiden name was Elizabeth Coulter, and to them five sons and five daughters were given, all of whom had reached maturity before leaving the East: William, who died In Springfield, Missouri, in 1842; Martin, who died in Texas; Daniel, who died in Laclede County, Missouri; John, whe also died in Laclede County; Judge David reared a family of nineteen children and died in Texas; Christina (Gooden); Kittie (Evans); Elizabeth (Williams); Sallie (Smythers), and Susan (Daniels). John Fullbright and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Their son William, well known as ” Uncle Billy,” married Ruth Hollingsworth and moved to Missouri, thence to Tennessee, and in...

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Biography of Ludwick Oldenburg

LUDWICK OLDENBURG. – The distinguished orchardist, of whom we now have the privilege of speaking is one of the prominent men of Union county and by his commendable efforts, as well as by his excellent abilities and stanch moral worth, ahs merited the position that he holds, wherein he has demeaned himself with a discretion and wisdom that have commended him to his fellow men, while his most excellent achievements in the line in which he is industrially employed have placed his name among the largest and most capable fruit growers of the entire northwest. In the northern part of the renowned Anglo-Saxon country of Holland, our subject was born, and there he received his early training, which ceased when he had reached the age of eleven but further research was made by personal effort later in life. He continued with his father, a fruit grower of that country, until he had arrived at the age of twenty and then was forced to serve in the army for three years, following which he returned to his father’s farm for a time and then went to work at different occupations until he was thirty-three, at which time he came to America, landing first in Detroit, Michigan, where one year was spent. Then he came to Ann Arbor, the same state, and for two and one-half years engaged in the fruit...

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Biographical Sketch of George C. Groll

Groll, George C.; supt. Morgan Lithograph Co.; born, Cleveland, Aug. 2, 1861; son of J. C. and Margaret (Schubert) Grail; public schools until 16, then went abroad and studied art in Paris and Holland for two years; married, June 25, 1901, Mabel Caroline Bell; upon coming to Cleveland, entered the employ of the Morgan Lithograph Co., in 1879; now supt. and stockholder in the Company; Mason; member Art...

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Vanderwall, Frank – Obituary

Frank Vanderwall Passes This Life Frank Vanderwall, rancher and resident of Rock Creek neighborhood for many years, passed this life at the state hospital in Pendleton Tuesday of this week. He was a native of Holland and was about 70 years of age at the time of his death. At one time he owned one of the finest ranches in Rock Creek district. He disposed of this several years ago, and since that time until his health failed about a year ago, he had made his home in Rock Creek village. At the time of his committment to the state hospital his estate was appraised at a value of $76,000. He was never married. He was a brother of G.W. Vanderwall of Haines. He also leaves a sister at Linden, Wn. There are no other immediate relatives in the United States. Funeral services were held in Haines and burial was made in the Coles cemetery Thursday afternoon. North Powder News Saturday, July 24,...

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Willem Willemsen Genealogy

Willem Willemsen Willem Willemsen, the Long Island ancestor, was born in Holland in 1637, came to New Amsterdam in the ship Concorde in 1657, and settled at Gravesend, L.L., where his name appears on the tax list of 1683, and on the census of Gravesend in 1698. He took the oath of allegiance to England in 1687. In the allotment of lands, 1670, he drew lot 32, and received another portion in 1700. In his will dated Dec.1, 1721, recorded in the surrogate’s office, New York (p. 288, liber 9), and other contemporaneous documents he signs his name Willem Willemsen. In 1715 he and his son Nicholas were subscribers to a fund for the support of Dominies Freeman and Antonides, who presided over the churches of Breuckelen, Flatlands, Jamaica, Gravesend and New Utrecht. He married probably in 1678, Marye Peterse Wyckoff, of Gravesend, born Oct. 17, 1653, daughter of Pieter Classy Wyckoff, who emigrated to this country in 1636, and married Greitze, daughter of Hendrick Van Ness. They had issue, Nicholas, born 1680, Pieter, bap. April 16, 1682; Jacobus, Cornelis, Marretie, bap. April 12, 1685 (married Abm. Emans of Gravesend); Ann, bap. May 29, 1695 (married John Griggs, Jr., of Gravesend. Nicholas Williamson Nicholas Williamson, eldest child of Willem and Mary Peterse (Wyckoff) Willemsen, was born at Gravesend, L. I., in 1680. He was an industrious and successful farmer....

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Biography of Frank Johnson

FRANK JOHNSON. – The career of this well-known contractor is a clear case of the promotion of merit. He has acquired an enviable position in the business world from simple integrity and excellence of worth. He was born in Holland in 1844, and came with his widowed mother to New York in 1852. He went soon to Buffalo, and there began to learn the trade of a carpenter and joiner. The war breaking out, and an appeal being made to the patriotic young men of the city, he volunteered as a soldier and served gallantly until the close of the struggle, meriting and receiving special mention by the colonel of the regiment. He saw severe work both in the West and South and at sea, and was wounded in a skirmish on the line of the Mobile & Charleston Railway. Being mustered out at Albany in 1866, he returned home and continued his studies as architect with Frederick Scott, one of the master mechanics of the city. In 1874 he began business on his own of the city. In 1874 he began business on his own responsibility, and made a specialty of first-class work and of overseeing construction. Tiring, however, of the city, and desiring to try the real American life of the West, he came to Washington Territory in 1880, and took up a farm in the Palouse...

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Biographical Sketch of Martus Cline

Martus Cline or Kline, immigrant ancestor of this family, came from Holland and settled in what is now (1910) Montgomery county, New York, before the revolution. He was living in 1790, according to the first federal census, and Jacob, John, William Henrik, doubtless his sons, were also heads of families in Montgomery county at that...

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Biography of Henry Van Asselt

HENRY VAN ASSELT. – The subject of this sketch was born in Holland April 11, 1817. In 1847 he emigrated to the United States, being the first person living in the locality of his old country home to come to this country. Prior to leaving home he promised to travel from one end of the Union to the other, and write his people and friends the results of his observations. From Castle Garden he went to New Jersey, and in that state remained for nine months, and then came west to St. Louis, Missouri. After a stop there of five months he went to Iowa, and worked there in a sawmill for ten months, and then journeyed on to Illinois, living in that state until 1850, when he returned to Iowa, and made one of a party of eight, who with two ox-teams as a motive power started across the plains to Oregon. The party consisted of John and James Thornton, Humphery Long, Jake Wagner and Charles Hendricks. They met with many experiences and hardships incident to such a trip, but arrived in safety at Clackamas river, near Oregon City, on September 21, 1850. They crossed the Willamette and went up to the Tualatin, where they worked at making shingles until spring. Everybody then had the gold fever; and the entire party caught the disease, and accordingly started for...

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